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Old 25th Feb 2013, 11:24 pm   #101
GP49000
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ben View Post
I also have a GT35P, I never imagined that there was a changer version.

Sadly, mine has had a hard life. It had been used at a community radio station, and the platter 'leans' slightly to the front left - perhaps due to heavy handedness in (or maybe total unsuitability for) back-cueing. The heavy platter looks nice, but a quick look below shows a less glamourous reality - it sits on a sort of flimsy plastic sub platter/base, presumably there is bearing or shaft wear here in my case - certainly doesn't look designed for any kind of rigourous use.
The center bearing "shaft" for the record changer models needs to be hollow for the multiple-play spindle; its "shaft" is merely a piece of cylindrical, thin metal that is an interference fit into the casting that forms the base of the thrust bearing. The "shaft" in my GT35 was loose and wiggly; I secured it with cyanoacrylate adhesive. While the center bearing of the GT35P differs...it is a fixed shaft with a thrust ball on top, with the thrust pad inside the bore of the plastic subplatter...if it isn't any more firmly attached, it may have become wobbly, or actually bent. The attachment is not strong enough for heavy back-cueing in the long term.

=================================================

Quote:
I had to strip, clean and rebuild the 3v DC motor as it would cut out. The motor itself is not very good quality, looks like the sort of sankyo thing found in cassette decks of the period.
Exactly what it is! The governor circuit integrated circuit, the UPC1003, was very commonly used in cassette decks of the day. It's almost impossible to find them any more; my last one, which I still have in the parts file, was purchased from Aiwa using the part number specified for their AD-3500 cassette deck.

Quote:
Despite all that, it still soldiers on, so I have a soft spot for it!
It DOES perform well when properly fettled!

The reject control in the GT25(P) and GT35(P) models operates differently from how we normally perceive such a device. It actuates
a velocity trip on the main gear in the automatic module, like in most automatic turntables, but backwards. Turning the knob to REJECT or
START/REJECT actually resets the levers of the velocity trip to their "idle" position; it is the return motion of the knob under spring tension
that moves the levers into position to start the auto cycle. I was told that this is because the velocity trip on these units is so light and
sensitive that if that first "reset" action were not taken, sometimes the velocity trip would not function properly. Garrard's solution works
but seemed counterintuitive to some, so that a Service Bulletin had to be issued to explain why, if a user turned the knob to REJECT and held
it there, the auto cycle would not start until he actually released it.

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Old 2nd Mar 2013, 9:00 pm   #102
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

Not being a frequent visitor to this forum, I just noticed this brilliant reference thread for Garrard. I thought I might add some information I recently discovered while going through several boxes of Avery Fisher's personal papers prior to their donation to the Julliard School at Lincoln Center in NY City.

For those in the UK who may be unfamiliar with the name Avery Fisher, he was the founder, president, and sole owner of Fisher Radio Corporation from 1945 to 1969. He sold his company in 1969 for many millions of dollars and subsequently embarked on a number of philanthropic endeavors related to music - most notably the 10 million dollar refurbishment of the Philharmonic Hall in NYC. It was subsequently renamed in his honor, becoming today's Avery Fisher Hall.

Prior to his founding of Fisher Radio in 1945, he had another, less well known company called Philharmonic Radio which he founded and ran from 1937 until 1945. This tiny company was notable for being among the earliest in this country to specialize exclusively in high fidelity radio-gramophones.

One consistent feature of Avery Fisher's products, both at Philharmonic and at Fisher, was his use of Garrard record changers. Beginning with the earliest Philharmonic Radio-Gramophones in '37, your choices were either a "Type A" R.C.1A or a "Type B" R.C.4.

R.C.1A "Type A"

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R.C.4 "Type B"

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Sales literature from later in the 1930s added Garrard's manual phonographs:

A.C.8, A.C.6, A.C. 4 and U.5

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Then, sometime around 1940, Philharmonic updated their offerings with the newer "Type A" R.C.50 and "Type B" R.C.10.

R.C.50 "Type A"

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R.C.10 "Type B"

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Among the items I found in Mr. Fisher's papers was the Philharmonic Radio Company's sales ledger covering 1940 through 1943. It lists every sale they made, giving every conceivable detail of each radio-gramophone. Most often the "Phono" column lists "A", "B" or "M" - at least through Nov. 1940. However, there are sporadic listings of specific models such as a few RC-30's which started appearing in Sept. 1940. The RC-50 first appeared in Dec. 1940.

After Nov. 1940 the A's and B's quickly taper off, replaced by F's and occasional C's - no doubt due to the war. In mid-1941 the F's become FR's, still with occasional C's. A consumer publication from this period mentions Philharmonic using Webster changers - probably their Model 40. Perhaps the F and/or FR refer to that model. Quite often there are notes in the ledger indicating the later replacement of the F's and FR's with Garrards - usually the RC-30. To me, that seems to indicate the Garrards were preferred when they were available.

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Old 2nd Mar 2013, 10:24 pm   #103
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

In 1960 Avery Fisher donated his original 1937 Philharmonic Futura wide-band TRF broadcast receiver to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC. He claimed it was the first commercial high fidelity receiver manufactured in the US. While that point is debatable, it was certainly among the first. Along with the receiver he also donated the original speakers and a Garrard RC-10. Could the RC-10 possibly date back to 1937? According to Philharmonic's own sales literature, it should date from after the R.C.1A and the R.C.4 - shouldn't it?

Avery Fisher's RC-10 In The Smithsonian Museum

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Photos courtesy the Smithsonian Museum of American History

Another discovery among Avery Fisher's papers were brochures for their 29-tube AM-FM Imperial model radio-gramophone from late 1941. It was intended to put Philharmonic in competition with the likes of E. H. Scott and Capehart at the pinnacle of American luxury radio-gramophones. To that end, it was to include Garrard's amazing RC-100 turn-over record changer.

I had read that very few of this model ever made it to North America - even that a shipment of them had been sunk in a U-boat attack. I always wondered if any Philharmonic Imperials had been sold with RC-100's. The answer was in Philharmonic's sales ledger . . . Yes! . . . one with "RC-100" specifically written in the "Phono" column and several others with "T.O." (Turn Over). The first one sold in Oct. 1941; the last in Feb. 1942 - each costing more than $1,000. Which begs the question: Where are they now?

"Philharmonic" RC-100

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Eventually WWII caused Philharmonic's stock of Garrards to dwindle. When the war eventually came to our shores, it soon put an end to Avery Fisher's high fidelity dreams. Like all US radio manufacturers, Philharmonic was forced to curtail civilian radio production and devote its energies to war work. Philharmonic expanded rapidly to fulfill its government contracts which, in turn, forced it to increase its capitalization. I suspect that is how Avery Fisher lost control of his company. He sold his interest in 1943 but stayed on as President until the end of the war.

As soon as the war was over and price controls on radios were relaxed, Avery Fisher started another company with the same mission as his first. This time he used has own name and carefully maintained it as a sole proprietorship. His first new catalog for the Fisher Radio Company (later Corporation) came out in 1946. In that catalog were two options for record changers - the one at the top of the page, used on the pricier models, was the Garrard RC-60. The other was a Webster-Chicago model.

Garrard RC-60 From Fisher's 1946 Catalog:

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Avery Fisher remained loyal to Garrard as long as he owned the company. There was a brief flirtation with Collaro in the 1950s on Fisher's entry-level models and a gradual shift toward Dual in the waning years of Mr. Fisher's reign . . . but overall Garrards dominated.

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Old 4th Mar 2013, 7:46 am   #104
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There are two YouTube videos of an actual, functioning Garrard RC-100. The first one is amazing enough, as it shows the changer handling records and turning them over; but the second is even more astounding, as it shows the mechanism underneath, that makes it all work:

1938 Garrard RC-100 Turn-Over Record Changer

1938 Garrard RC-100 Bench Test

The story about the entire production run of RC-100s (which were wholly dedicated to the USA market) going to the bottom of the Atlantic when the British merchant ship carrying them was sunk by a U-boat has been told many times. Apparently the few surviving RC-100s were prototypes that were sent to the USA ahead of the main shipment, or that remained at the factory in Swindon.

I serviced many Fisher consoles with Garrard record changers. For the most part, the electronics in those consoles were identical in circuitry to that in Fisher separate components. Changes were made for packaging the equipment in cabinets but those were extremely high-quality (and expensive) consoles. The Garrards did them credit.
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Old 8th Apr 2013, 8:56 pm   #105
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Second-generation Unimechs

The Garrard Unimech series underwent an austere updating around 1980. By then it had been on the market for a few years and had supplanted the Autoslims as the "popular-priced" record changer line, while the Autoslim chassis was reworked to belt drive with higher-performing tonearms and refinements to move it upscale and enhance its performance in the midpriced hi-fi bracket.

The Unimech update primarily involved the tonearms. Instead of the straight arms styled after the Zero 100 with its angled tonearm head, the new arms followed the increasingly popular trend to S-shaped arms, with a matching round counterweight instead of rectangular. Garrard showed its skill in "parts-bin engineering" again, by designing the new armtube so that on most of the "new" models, it could mount into the same plastic moulding as had the old, straight arm. This permitted the tonearm pivots, stylus pressure adjustment spring, and the tonearm height and setdown adjustments to remain exactly the same as before. Some of the S-shaped arms used interchangeable cartridge mounts (the C5 design from the DD75 and 990B); others had a similarly-styled tonearm head with no removable slide.

These updated Unimech models were designated in the 600 series, with a "family lineage" from the corresponding models in the original Unimechs, the 6-series.

The basic updated Unimech record changer, replacing the 6-300, was the 630S. It had the S-shaped tonearm, most with the removable C5 cartridge mount. It had an antiskating control operated by a lever, with dual calibrations for elliptical and spherical styli, rather than the knob with single calibration on the 6-300. Tracking weight was set by a screwdriver and required a gauge for accurate setting...exactly as on the 6-300, for the involved parts were the same. Also as on the 6-300, tonearm cueing lift/lower was damped with viscous silicone fluid, and multiple record play was by conventional pusher spindle and an overarm to stabilize the record stack; the pusher spindle was replaceable with a short spindle for single play, and the overarm could be swung to the rear, out of the way of the platter. The 630S is known in versions both labeled "MADE IN ENGLAND," and not. It has also been seen mounted in plinths labeled "GRADIENTE" instead of "GARRARD." All this suggests that the model was assembled both in Swindon and in Brazil; previously major components were already being made in Brazil by Gradiente and shipped to Britain for assembly. These new models continued to be made with markings for phonograph makers who used them in their products, and who could specify them with either a four-pole or two-pole motor.

There was a single-play version of the 630S, with only a short spindle and no overarm. It was designated the 630SP.

A down-line record changer model, the 620S, had the same tonearm as the 630S but no antiskating and no fluid damping on the tonearm lift/lower device, both being provided by a different modular part mounted on the Unimech subchassis. The 620s I have encountered also lacked the removable C5 cartridge mount, though others have reported samples that do have it. The single-play version was the 620SP. These correspond to the earlier, straight-tonearm models 6-200C and 6-200CP.

I have never seen a reference to a Model 610S with small platter, that would have been the successor to the 6-100. However, as distribution to the USA of Garrards was getting spotty by this time, it's possible that they never officially came across the Atlantic where I would have seen them.


Photos:

620S. Note lack of antiskating compared to 630S, next.

630S, this one in a plinth branded for the "Lloyds" company.

630S, not labeled "Made in England."

630S tonearm detail, showing its derivation from the 6-300

630S, not only not labeled "Made in England" but in a "Gradiente" plinth for the South American market.
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Old 8th Apr 2013, 9:17 pm   #106
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

Second-generation Reverse Unimech models

The Model 640S was the Reverse Unimech version of the 630S, with the same tonearm, antiskate and controls, but with the reversed pusher spindle and a side support for the record stack; and no overarm. There was no single-play version, since it would have been no different from the 630SP.

The higher priced end of the Unimech series had a new Reverse Unimech Model 775, replacing the earlier 770. Unlike the cheaper Unimechs, this one did not carry over its basic tonearm pivot and pressure-setting mechanism from the prior model. Instead, it had a movable counterweight on a screw thread, with adjustable calibrated collar for setting tracking weight once the tonearm had been set to zero balance, replacing the more complex and more expensive downward-pulling spring for setting tracking weight. It also incorporated an improvement to the horizontal-motion tonearm bearing that substantially reduced friction if properly assembled and adjusted, and which was previously introduced as a change in some upscale Unimech models (it has been found in the 770). Details about this refinement will follow.


640S. Tonearm identical to 630S. Only changes are the side support for the record stack, a different multiple-play spindle, and the associated mechanical changes underneath.

640S in a badge-engineered plinth branded for Monteverdi, the high-priced line of Lloyd's.

775.

775 side view

775 tonearm, antiskate detail
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Last edited by GP49000; 8th Apr 2013 at 9:26 pm.
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Old 8th Apr 2013, 9:27 pm   #107
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

Thanks again for all this amazing Garrard info.

I note the "Quality Engineered by Garrard" slogan on the aluminium trim, which is surely a tribute to BSR's much more familiar "Precision Crafted in Great Britain",

Nick.
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Old 8th Apr 2013, 10:47 pm   #108
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That center aluminium trim disc also bears the "Made in England" lettering. My own 775 lacks it. Note that in the photos of the 630S that lack "Made in England" on the control panel, the trim disc is missing entirely. Perhaps those still being built at Swindon (if any) had a trim disc carrying that marking?
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Old 17th Apr 2013, 11:54 pm   #109
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An improved tonearm bearing for the Unimechs:

Mentioned in prior installments of this series with regard to the introduction of the Unimech series record changers and single players has been their inability to operate at tracking weights demanded by the better hi-fi cartridges of the day. This was due to friction in the tonearm's horizontal movement. Garrard knew this; a minimum tracking weight of 2.5 grams was specified in the service manual for the entire Unimech series when it first was introduced.

This was acceptable for the original intended market for the Unimechs, which were mostly to be sold with ceramic cartridges tracking at 4-5 grams. But expanding the line into hi-fi models proved irresistible, especially since the Unimechs cost less to manufacture than the Autoslim chassis while hopefully being sold at the same retail prices, or even a bit higher due to their contemporary styling.

In fact, the USA first saw the Unimech in a hi-fi version equipped with magnetic cartridges from Pickering and Shure, with broad-radius elliptical styli that could be operated at up to four grams without damaging records. The model number "42" placed it just slightly above the longstanding entry level Autoslim model 40B. Tracking weight was preset at the factory to 3 to 3.5 grams; without a built-in tracking weight gauge, they had no means by which users would know that these models could not track as low as the two grams recommended for the 40B.

But as the Unimech line expanded upward, something had to be done. The Model 70 had a built-in calibration for its user-adjustable tracking weight adjustment, and it was placed in a considerably higher price echelon; indeed, promotional literature claimed it was "in performance, features and styling, every bit the equal of last year's SL72B." Never mind that this was flatly untrue; if it couldn't track below two grams (the SL72B was even better than that), the customer would know it.

The Unimech vertical tonearm shaft rotates in a machined bore in the pickup base assembly casting. A flange in the shaft indexes to one in the bore, to prevent the tonearm from being lifted out of the unit. On the bottom, thrust of the vertical shaft is taken by a ball-bearing, preloaded by a compression spring that sits in a plastic tnrust bearing, built like a "socket" that seats into the Unimech subchassis plate. It is all easy to assemble, with no finicky adjustments necessary, or possible. However, with the spring preload, the flanges in the shaft and in the pickup base assembly rub on each other. This is the cause of most of the friction in the horizontal movement of the Unimech tonearm.

Garrard's answer to this was an adjustable thrust bearing. The plain plastic socket was replaced by an open-ended, threaded plastic fitting. The ball bearing and the compression spring were eliminated; a screw with a polished ball contour on its end, its screw thread fitting into the threads on the plastic socket, was substituted. The screw was to be adjusted by the assembler to provide the barest amount of free axial play in the tonearm shaft, so that the flanges in the shaft and in the pickup base assembly would not rub when in use. Thus, a low-friction bearing assembly resulted, which Garrard specified at 1.5 grams.

The new design is low-friction only if properly set up. I acquired a Garrard 775 because its prior owner got fed up with its not being able to handle cartridges tracking under 3.5 grams; with a Stanton 500 rated at 2-5 grams, slight record eccentricity would cause the stylus cantilever to flex in its suspension, because the arm wasn't following the eccentricity. I traded an SP25 Mk III to him; it tracked the Stanton 500 at its lowest-specified tracking weight, and he was happy. I verified the excessive horizontal bearing friction on the 775; it was so stiff that the antiskate, at its maximum setting for five grams tracking weight, was not able to move the arm past the friction (this puts the approximate lateral friction at about a half gram, as seen at the stylus)! Digging into the 775, I found that the screw in the tonearm thrust bearing had been adjusted too tight...and then was secured with lock paint. Removing the lock paint and readjusting the screw fixed it.

Because of the declining sales volume of record changers by the late 1970s, I have not seen enough Unimech samples to know precisely when this change was incorporated, and in exactly which models. It is easy enough to tell by looking at the underside of the record player, which type thrust bearing is fitted. The older, spring-loaded thrust is made of white plastic, with a closed end. The newer, adjustable, lower-friction design is moulded of black plastic and has a hex-headed screw threaded into it. Specific samples I have seen of the 6-200 and 6-300 models, the 440 and 62, and the 630S and 620S models have the nonadjustable, spring-loaded type; and of the 770 and 775, the adjustable, low-friction type.


Photos:

Exploded diagram of the Unimech pickup base and subchassis.

Schematic of the 6-300 pickup arm bearing, original spring-loaded type.

Schematic of the 775 pickup arm bearing, adjustable type

Photo of 6-200 underside, note WHITE, closed-end thrust bearing.

Photo of 775 underside, note BLACK thrust bearing with adjustable screw.
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Old 5th May 2013, 11:40 am   #110
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Fascinating history, many thanks. One model I don't see mentioned is the single play SP20B, which I owned for a few years in my youth, before replacing with a gently used Pioneer PL-12D. An Autoslim derivation, it was similar to the 40B less some of its changer bits. I have mixed feelings about my time with this unit. On one hand, I whiled away many happy hours with it, listening to early prog-rock. On the other, it was a rumbly beast, with an inadequate arm lift and severely warped platter, and the plastic base resonated horribly.

I found a pic in the Allied Radio catalog archive, inexplicably with long spindle: http://www.alliedcatalogs.com/html/1971-300/hr068.html.

I always assumed that since mine was a "B," there must have been a prior version, but don't really know.

These days, in addition to several manual decks, I own an SL-95B a friend gave me a few years back. After some work, it functions acceptably, except for a nagging issue if not shutting off properly after playing 45s with the fat spindle. A project for another day...

Thanks again!
Mike
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Old 8th May 2013, 12:47 am   #111
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Post #32, on Page 2, shows the SP20B and its predecessor the SP20.

The SP20 was a single-play version of the Model 50/40 Mk II but with a cheaper platter mat and, initially, a two-pole motor instead of the four-pole (in USA versions of the 50/40 Mk II). Later on the SP20 was fitted with the four-pole motor. Unfortunately the SP20 and SP20B lacked automatic single play as was featured in the contemporary SP25 Mk II/III. This limited its usefulness. It was a mystery to me at the time as to why, unless American importer British Industries Corp. thought a full-auto single player would be too much competition for the record changers.

You MIGHT be able to restore proper operation of the SL95B with the large record spindle, by adjusting the screw indicated with the RED arrow on the photo of the bottom side of an SL-chassis.
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Old 8th May 2013, 3:07 pm   #112
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CORRECTION to the immediate prior post, #111 which stated: "...automatic single play as was featured in the contemporary SP25 Mk II/III."

The SP25 Mark II did NOT have automatic single play; that was introduced with the SP25 Mk III.

The SP25 Mk II had a tonearm lift mechanism integrated with the operating control, which was marked: OFF PLAY LIFT.

The SP20 model lacked this and had no arm-lift facility to begin play, other than the user's hand. It had auto lift, arm return and auto shutoff at the end of a record and after REJECT during mid-record.
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Old 10th May 2013, 1:00 am   #113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GP49000 View Post
Post #32, on Page 2, shows the SP20B and its predecessor the SP20.

The SP20 was a single-play version of the Model 50/40 Mk II but with a cheaper platter mat and, initially, a two-pole motor instead of the four-pole (in USA versions of the 50/40 Mk II). Later on the SP20 was fitted with the four-pole motor. Unfortunately the SP20 and SP20B lacked automatic single play as was featured in the contemporary SP25 Mk II/III. This limited its usefulness. It was a mystery to me at the time as to why, unless American importer British Industries Corp. thought a full-auto single player would be too much competition for the record changers.

You MIGHT be able to restore proper operation of the SL95B with the large record spindle, by adjusting the screw indicated with the RED arrow on the photo of the bottom side of an SL-chassis.
Ah, I had overlooked that post. Probably time for new bifocals.

Thanks for the tip also, will try that adjustment next time I'm underneath...

Best,
Mike
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Old 20th May 2013, 5:05 pm   #114
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The Garrard RA-7 pusher platform seven-inch small hole record adapter

Today, a brief step back farther into the past to the 1960s for a minor accessory seldom seen, at least in the USA:

In 1960, Garrard introduced its Type A Automatic Turntable. Based upon the time-proven pusher-platform Garrard chassis, the Type A featured an advanced tonearm and a heavy, cast oversized (10") platter replacing the non-counterweighted arm and stamped steel seven-inch platter of its predecessors, the RC88 and RC98 record changers.

This large platter created a problem. Automatic play of 7" small hole records (there were both 33rpm and 78rpm records in this size) had been acccommodated on the prior models by a 7" position on the pusher platform that supported the record stack from the side. With the larger platter, the pusher platform could no longer be designed to move inward toward the spindle far enough to support a 7" record; it would strike the platter. So on the Type A and all other pusher platform models from then on, the platform only had 12" and 10" positions. Even the lower-priced 88 Mk II which did have a 7" platter lacked that 7" position, as it was a stripped-down Type A with identical mechanism.

Automatic play of 7", 45rpm records, all of which had large centre holes, was provided for by the Large Record Spindle LRS-3, the same as had been used with the earlier RC88 and RC98; the LRS-3 did not use the pusher platform for record support. For 7" small hole records, Garrard designed the RA-7 (Record Adapter, 7 inch) as an optional, extra cost accessory, priced in the USA at $1.50. The RA-7 clipped onto the pusher platform, which would be placed in its 10" position; the RA-7 provided an extension platform to support the edge of 7" records, and a sliding pawl, pushed by the pusher in the platform at the appropriate time in the cycle to push the 7" record onto the platter for play.

The RA-7 was mentioned in USA Garrard advertising in 1960 and 1962. With the introduction of the Type A70 in 1964, the RA-7 was no longer shown in the USA "Comparator" booklet or the British catalog sheet, and neither did it appear in the 1966 catalog which included the 70 Mk II, the last in the long history of Garrard pusher platform automatic turntables and record changers. However, it did fit and work on both of these "70" models.

The RA-7 was not mentioned, either in the list of accessories and replacement parts, nor in the operating instructions, in any of the instruction manuals for the models that would have used it: 88 Mark II, Type A, Type A Mark II, Type A70 and 70 Mk II.

I have owned at least one Garrard pusher platform machine continuously since 1967, when I purchased a secondhand Type A. Just for the sake of completeness, I tried to order the RA-7 adapter from local Garrard dealers but their dealer catalogs no longer listed it. Over the years, I never saw one and wondered if I ever would.

Finally, earlier this year, I acquired an RA-7 as part of a package of Garrard parts and accessories. It was still in its original plastic bag and showed no signs of use. Attached are the last page of the Garrard USA 1962 catalog, listing the RA-7; and photos of the RA-7, the little plastic bag it came in, and a Garrard 70 Mk II set up for automatic play of 7" small-hole records...perhaps the first time this RA-7 has ever been installed onto a turntable. A shame: I could not find a 7" small-hole record to play!
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Last edited by GP49000; 20th May 2013 at 5:11 pm.
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Old 20th May 2013, 5:37 pm   #115
bobbyball
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

I could really do with one of these, have several "Lab A" decks and it would be nice to play small hole 45's on them (have several thousand!!!)...

Nice write up on the Garrard decks, would make a superb book!

Robert
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Old 11th Jun 2013, 6:55 pm   #116
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

The "Delglide" direct drive models

Garrard's excellent DD75 direct drive turntable had no automatic tonearm setdown and cycling, only an end-of-side arm lift and shutoff. That was because its Matsushita direct drive motor could not accommodate a mechanical drive to an auto mechanism. The auto mechanism in Garrard's GT models, dubbed "Delglide" by the advertising department, used a cogged belt from a gear at the center of the platter. Garrard designed an all-new direct drive motor that would clear the path of the cogged belt, and having a through-shaft with a drive gear for the belt, underneath the motor chassis. The new motor was combined with the basic GT-20/25P/35P design, to create a new series of direct drive Garrards. The DD75 was discontinued.

The first "Delglide" direct drive models were DD131 and DD132, with varying levels of single play automation. The DD130, fully manual, came later. All had a manual cueing device for tonearm lift/lower. All had a pitch control and stroboscope on the plater, for an approximate 3% speed adjustment. There were no record changer models at all; multiple-play, once Garrard's bread-and-butter, was only on the low end Unimech models and the belt-drive GT Delglides.

Cosmetics, essentially the same as the corresponding GT models, varied in details through production of these models. Some of every model had silver tonearm tubes, others black; nearly all DD130 had silver armtubes, while the other models had a more equal mix. Counterweights were of the same basic construction as those on the large-chassis, belt-drive GT models but during production the chrome plating was supplanted by a black finish, with the silver-tonearm DD130s generally still supplied with silver counterweights; and black counterweights found their way onto samples of the GT series, too. The headshell, while remaining of the same excellent, lightweight but rigid magnesium construction, also came in a matte grey and in black as production progressed. Some photos show a later headshell design but since that part was so easily interchanged, they may show a change made by an end user.

Plinths were matte silver on top with charcoal control panels, and matte dark grey below.

The DD131 had automatic tonearm lift and return at the end of side or when selected by a Reject control; but manual setdown to begin play, with the optional aid of the manual tonearm lift/lower device. It appears to have been the most popular of the line.

The DD132 added automatic tonearm setdown at the beginning of the record, and repeat play. Record size selection was linked to speed selection: 33rpm records were all assumed to be 12-inch; 45rpm record, all seven-inch. Setdown to begin play of other sizes could only be done manually with the aid of the manual lift/lower if desired.

The DD130 was fully manual; no auto setdown, no auto arm lift and return, no Reject control. It had only a vestigial tonearm base replacing the automatic module in the higher-line models. Its only operational controls were OFF/33/45 and the tonearm lift/lower.

Photos:

DD130 (later type headshell)
DD130 tonearm, counterweight, antiskate and cueing detail. Silver arm and counterweight.
DD131 with matte grey Garrard magnesium headshell and silver armtube.
DD131 control panel. Black headshell and armtube.
DD131 control panel. Grey or aged silver headshell, black armtube.
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Last edited by GP49000; 11th Jun 2013 at 7:21 pm.
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Old 11th Jun 2013, 7:10 pm   #117
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

More photos of the DD models:

DD131 tonearm detail, showing black counterweight
DD132
DD132 control panel
DD132 pitch control and strobe, same on all models of the series.
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Last edited by GP49000; 11th Jun 2013 at 7:17 pm.
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Old 27th Sep 2013, 7:40 pm   #118
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

hi , this is a useful history of the DD-130 direct drive series of turntables. In other discussions its specification always seems to be a poor comparison with other high end units.
My own model was from April 1980 -i used it until the mid 80s when CD's came on the market ;these days i get it out of the box every year or so and run it for a few hours ;it is as silent as the day it was bought; i used it alot in the early 80s.
From memory , the s/n ratio was 50dB ( DinA ) and 70 dB (Din B ) the wow &flutter was less than or equal to 0.06% . We endeavoured to listen to the music being played ,rather than the unit playing it
Garrard had an interesting brochure -it was A4 size on the outer cover ;the inside pages were half that size. This manual covered the operation of all three decks-you omitted the parts inapplicable to yours ;the DD130 was totally manual.
My model is from 1980 ;by that time ,the ground lead still was left as bare wire ,but the end of connecting leads had by then changed to phono plugs . To identify this update ,the company now referred to the unit as DD130-1; this identification is on the deck itself as well as on the box.
I assume the earlier models had 5pin DIN plugs -am i correct ?
The box indicates Garrard was "A Plessey Company "
My limited knowledge of cartridges was confined to Shure M95 - a smooth controlled type of sound ; Shure M75 , much brighter but still slightly restrained ; and the one which is still on my unit : the Ortofon FF15 E Mk 2- this was the cheapest cartridge in their range-it was quite bright and crisp ; more dynamic -suited rock music
As one engineer told me at the time- "never mind about what things cost and their spec ;if you get the sound you want , that's all that matters .

The wow &flutter was ... " WRMS "
On the lid is a label referring to the type of motor used in this unit "frequency generator DC servo" ; is this the same motor as referred to , earlier on in this thread ?
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Old 28th Sep 2013, 11:07 pm   #119
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

It might be a new type of motor the company was fitting to later models ;from the photos of the DD130 model , this one has phono plugs at the end of the leads ,so i might be completely mistaken regarding what the "... -1 " part on my unit meant.
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Old 6th Oct 2013, 6:09 am   #120
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

David Rucklidge asked, "On the lid is a label referring to the type of motor used in this unit 'frequency generator DC servo;' is this the same motor as referred to, earlier on in this thread?"

The "frequency generator DC servo" label on the dust cover refers to the type of speed regulator on the direct drive DD models. The label on some direct drive models, however, was "Direct Drive."

My GT-35, GT-25 and GT-35P have both a DIN socket and phono jacks, with a connection for a removable ground wire. This was changed in the -1 models.

Otherwise the -1 series of GT- and DD- models was mostly a cosmetic update to the corresponding earlier single-play models, while the record changer models GT-25 and GT-35 were not updated to -1, probably because their sales had been weak and there were substantial remaining unsold stock. On the -1 models, the all-black counterweight that was introduced partway through production of the earlier series became universal (black paint was cheaper than chrome plating). The plinth was simplified and the moulding of the plastic lower plinth was changed to present a lower-profile appearance, though the actual height was virtually unchanged. The option of a plinth with its top in woodgrain instead of silver was offered. The only functional change occurred on the late-production version of the GT-35P-1, where the dual fine speed adjust knobs for 33 and 45 speeds were replaced by a single speed adjust knob.

Photos:

DD130-1 with optional woodgrained top plinth
GT25-1 showing silver top plinth with low-profile-look, moulded lower plinth
GT-35-1 with dual fine speed adjust knobs
GT-35-1 with single fine speed adjust knob
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Last edited by GP49000; 6th Oct 2013 at 6:24 am.
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