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Old 14th Dec 2012, 8:47 am   #81
GP49000
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

The 440 was an upgraded 6-300. Its tonearm had a fixed counterweight and its upward-pulling spring was adjusted by a knob, with a pointer on a calibrated tracking weight scale. The user would install the cartridge, then adjust tracking weight until the tonearm was balanced, the stylus tip just above the record. The user would then turn the knob to set tracking weight; longer hash mark calibrations represented higher tracking weight; one hash mark represented a one gram increment. The 440 also had its antiskating controlled by a lever instead of a knob, with dual antiskate calibrations for spherical and elliptical styli, and a removable cartridge clip, the C4.

Like the Model 42, the 440 had different versions. The 440 had a four-pole motor and was sold as a chassis only, without plinth and cartridge. The 440M was a four-pole motor version sold with plinth and a Pickering V-15/ATE-4 magnetic cartridge; and the 440C was a two-pole motor version with plinth and a ceramic cartridge. All had the same advanced tonearm over the 6-300 and Model 42 version, and LOOKED the same from above.

Photos:

440M
440M with "Omnipack" box in which it was prepackaged (dust cover is missing).
440M antiskate control detail showing adjustment by lever, and dual scale calibrations.
440M tracking weight control detail showing adjustment by knob, and tracking weight scale
C4 cartridge clip
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Old 14th Dec 2012, 10:31 am   #82
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

So how did the pusher-spindle-based end-of-stack detection system work on these machines, then?
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Old 14th Dec 2012, 4:58 pm   #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajs_derby View Post
So how did the pusher-spindle-based end-of-stack detection system work on these machines, then?
The pusher in the spindle normally pushes the record off the spindle step, so it falls to the platter. If it pushes THE OTHER WAY it is restrained from further motion if it encounters the hole in the record, thus detecting the record's presence. This method was first used by Garrard in the large-chassis record changers in the SL95 series.

Garrard used two different mechanical sequences with this detection method: in most, the detection was done at the beginning of the cycle, just like in the record changers where the detection was done by the overarm, by a feeler arm such as on the RC88 and Type A, or by the tripoise spindle in the Lab 80. However, in the SL95, etc., the detection was done at the END of the record changing cycle; the mechanism was being told that there was another record waiting to be played once the current one ended. If you were to play a stack of records on the SL95 type mechanism, and with the penultimate record playing, then removed the last record from the spindle, the unit would repeat-play the one already on the platter!

The pusher-spindle-based end-of-stack detection system was necessary because Garrard wanted to build record changers that would not have overarms. I don't know what effect it had on cost; the overarms on the Autoslims were made of multiple parts, with drilling, machining, and the installation of a pin in the overarm shaft before the main upper part of the overarm was pressed on. The Unimech overarm is a simple steel rod, bent to shape with a plastic trim piece snapped on as a "handle" for lifting it. So there was a cost benefit to the Unimech overarm but I don't know if it offset the cost of the pusher-spindle detection mechanism.

Last edited by GP49000; 14th Dec 2012 at 5:04 pm.
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Old 14th Dec 2012, 7:54 pm   #84
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Photos of some of the mechanical workings of the Unimech models.

1. Underside of a Unimech record changer, clearly showing the plastic operating levers and how they connect to the metal levers extending from the Unimech subchassis. The ends of the metal levers operate in an arc, while the "handle" ends of the plastic levers slide in slots in the chassis. Thus the fit of the plastic levers must necessarily be sloppy, so the plastic levers can pivot slightly as they operate!

2. The plastic levers, disassembled. The U-shaped one engages two mechanisms, for speed change and record size selection.

3. The Unimech subchassis, with its main cam and most levers removed.

4. Same, showing the tonearm base and cueing-antiskate assemblies mounted to the subchassis.
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Old 17th Dec 2012, 8:38 am   #85
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Single play Unimechs

There were relatively few single play Unimech models in the first two or three years of production. In the marketplace, they had to contend with not only competitor's models, but with the Autoslim-derived single play models from Garrard itself, the SP25 series. The contemporary SP25 models had heavy, nonmagnetic platters, better-tracking tonearms and smoother-operating controls, and besides all that, the SP25 models had made a name for themselves. The single-play Unimechs sold poorly, with only the 6-200CP having some success, probably because of its price, substantially lower than that of the SP25 models. Photos of any but the 6-200CP are scarce.

Like the SP25 models, all could play a single record automatically, would repeat the record if the user pushed the operating control to AUTO, and at the end of a record would lift and return the arm, and shut off.

The 6-300P was a 6-300 lacking record changing facility, supplied without multiple-play spindle and lacking the overarm and the supporting structure associated with it. It had fluid-damped cueing and antiskating adjusted by a knob.

The 6-200CP was a 6-200C lacking record changing facility, multiple-play spindle and overarm. It had non-damped cueing and no antiskating.

The 63SP was an upgraded model with a dynamically balanced, counterweight-adjusted tonearm having needle pivots for vertical motion, a downward-pulling tracking weight spring adjustable with a convenient knob, and a tracking weight scale calibrated in grams. Its antiskating was controlled by a lever, but there was only a single scale calibration. Cueing was viscous-damped. Even this model had the same stamped steel platter as the lower-priced models, and could not be used with cartridges having a strong external magnetic field, though by this time that meant only the Decca London cartridges, which were far more expensive than the deck itself.

Photos:

6-200CP in carrying case
6-200CP in plinth
6-200CP overhead view
6-200CP tonearm head and control panel. Note different GARRARD lettering.
63SP sales brochure
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Last edited by GP49000; 17th Dec 2012 at 8:46 am.
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Old 18th Dec 2012, 11:42 pm   #86
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

The Garrard 5-300 and its siblings

The 5-series Unimech machines have not yet been mentioned. They were a low-budget line with a full-size unit plate and the Unimech subchassis. They had a control panel with tiny, separate speed and size selectors, like the CC10 minichanger from which the Unimechs derived. Garrard considered the 5-300 as the "basic" model. It had a 10 1/2 inch steel platter, a NON-counterweighted version of the basic Unimech-type tonearm, with an uncalibrated screwdriver adjustment for its tracking force; a screwdriver-adjusted dial for setting the antiskate; and undamped cueing. The 5-200 had the large platter, no cueing and no antiskate. The 5-100 was a 5-200 with a small platter.

All 5-100, 5-200 and 5-300 models had two-pole motors. Trim and platter mats could differ.

I have photos of only the 5-300. The cover of the parts manual for 5-100 and 5-200 show the differences in those models.
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Old 23rd Dec 2012, 9:50 pm   #87
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickthedentist View Post
Were those ever sold in the UK? I've certainly never seen one.
The styling has a very BSR-esque look about it.
In the UK, round about 1978 the Garrard 6-300 Unimech was used in the GEC 2817 Audio Unit fitted with a Garrard KS41B or more often a Sonotone 3549 cartridge. Other models in GEC range used the cheaper BSR deck.

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Old 24th Dec 2012, 6:52 am   #88
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The Reverse Unimechs

One of the "traditional" features separating "Automatic Turntables" from ordinary record changers was the lack of an overarm to stabilize the stack of records on the multiple-play spindle. Eliminating the overarm made it easier to play single records using the short, manual play spindle, and cleaned up the appearance of the record playing unit. Different manufacturers had different means of accomplishing this. Most used a tripoise spindle that balanced the stack of records on three retractible "arms." Garrard first used their traditional pusher platform, then tried a tripoise spindle in the Lab 80, and finally settled on a conventional pusher spindle with a record support platform in the right rear of the unit, in the SL95 and later "automatic turntable" models.

The SL95 and its offspring, and later the models based on the GT-series modular mechanism, were purposely designed with a record support platform. But the Unimech models were not. Garrard wished to attach some of the "Automatic Turntable" cachet to the decidedly ordinary record changers in the Unimech line by incorporating the record support platform and getting rid of the overarm. This required that the action of the record changing spindle be altered. The standard Unimech design, like the Autoslims, pushed records off their spindles toward the right rear; but with a record support platform, they would have to push the records toward the left front instead, so they would fall off the record support platform. From the basic Unimech subchassis, linkages were modified to accomplish this, and the spindle itself was rotated by 180°, exactly reversed; hence the designation "Reverse Unimech" for models so equipped. A slightly inclined spindle was another modification.

The 6-400 was the basic Reverse Unimech model. It was similar to the 6-300 except for lacking an overarm and having a record support platform instead, with the reversed linkages and spindle. It also had a different antiskating device, adjusted by a lever on a calibrated scale instead of a knob. The 6-400 was built with both two-pole and four-pole motors. Trim items such as the platter mat could vary.

The Model 62 was primarily intended for the USA market. It had the more advanced tonearm of the 440 series, with non-adjustable counterweight, a knob and a graduated scale for easy adjustment of tracking weight, and the removable C4 cartridge slide. It did NOT have the 440's dual-calibrated antiskate adjustment, but rather the 6-400's single calibration. Early on it was finished in white to match the Zero 100, Zero 92 and Model 82. Later, it was made in black, as the white scheme was abandoned through the entire line.

The Model 70...not to be confused with the earlier A70 and 70 Mk II...had a fully counterbalanced tonearm with adjustable counterweight, and a downward pulling spring for tracking weight. Its adjustment was by a knob with a tracking weight scale calibrated in grams. It had needle pivots for vertical tonearm movement, and the removable C4 cartridge clip. Antiskating adjustment was by a lever with a single calibration, like the Model 62 and 6-400. It was built only with the Synchro-Lab induction/synchronous motor and had an additional, fixed counterbalance underneath the unit plate, to make its tonearm balance insensitive to tilting of the unit. To give it the "Zero 100" look, it was built with a transparent plastic housing around the pickup arm's gimbal, and like the Model 62, it was first produced in white, for a "family resemblance" to the Zero 100, and later in black.

The Model 770 was a slightly modified Model 70. It added a dual calibration to its antiskate adjustment, for spherical and elliptical styli; but omitted the auxiliary tonearm counterbalancing under the unit plate.

In America, the Reverse Unimechs were touted as advances and improvements over predecessor models. The Model 62 was intended to replace the SL55B, while claimed to be so far superior that it defied meaningful comparison. The Model 70 reached even higher. Although it was nominally the successor to the SL65B, it was claimed to be every bit the equal in appearance, features and performance to the more expensive SL72B. However, the balky Unimech operating controls and the horizontal tonearm pivotry virtually unchanged from the CC10 minichanger made such claims dubious. Sales of the Models 62 and 70 in the USA were poor. Elsewhere, the 6-400 and 770 did no better.

Photos:

6-400
Model 62, white, in USA catalog illustration
Model 62, white
Unimech spindle
Reverse Unimech spindle (both viewed approximately as from tonearm head)
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Last edited by GP49000; 24th Dec 2012 at 7:16 am.
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Old 24th Dec 2012, 7:05 am   #89
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Photos:

Model 62 tonearm detail
Model 62 in black, on 1964 USA plinth...same cutout as the Autoslim chassis
Model 70 in white
Model 70 tonearm detail
Model 70 in black
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Old 24th Dec 2012, 7:13 am   #90
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Photos:

Model 770
Model 770 side view with antiskate, arm details
Model 770 tonearm detail
Model 770 tonearm, showing tracking weight calibration in grams
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Old 24th Dec 2012, 5:34 pm   #91
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Addendum to the discussion about the 5-300, 5-100 and 5-200

I did not mention in the original post: the 5-100 and 5-200, as shown on the front cover of their parts supplement, have a tonearm that is downgraded from that of the 5-300. It is the tonearm of the Garrard CC10 minichanger from which all of the Unimech models are derived. With the mechanical bits of the Unimech taken directly from the CC10, the distance from record centre to tonearm pivot had to remain fixed. So the tonearm geometry (length, offset) of the Unimech models, from the cheapest and simplest to the most expensive and most highly styled and featured, had to remain that of the CC10 minichanger.

I was able to find one more photo of the 5-300; it's actually worse than the one I posted earlier but shows it with a different mat, and a plinth probably of the "Masterworks" brand. I still have no actual photos of the 5-100 and 5-200 (or of the 6-100T which uses the same tonearm from the CC10).
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Old 12th Jan 2013, 2:57 pm   #92
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The Small GT models

With the DD-75, GT-55 and the Unimech models, Garrard had fully committed to modular construction, where smaller subassemblies
were completed independently and then assembled to a main chassis on a shorter, simpler assembly line. An expansion of the GT series featured this type of construction in two different chassis, a larger one that would replace Garrard automatic turntables in the higher priced range, and a smaller one that would cover the lower range.

All of them had their entire automatic mechanism built upon a subchassis even smaller than that of the Unimech models, mounted underneath the tonearm. It was simplified from the GT-55 modular mechanism. Like the GT-55's modular mechanism, it was driven by a cogged belt from a pinion gear at the center of the platter. All its mechanical parts were moulded from low-friction DuPont Delrin® plastic. Garrard intended that the new GT modular mechanism never need lubrication throughout its service life.

The platter was driven by a rubber belt, which was moved between steps on the motor pulley to provide two speeds, 33 and 45. There was no fine speed adjustment.

The small GT models had their automatic module, motor, platter bearing assembly and controls assembled to a small main chassis just slightly larger than their platters. Only a squarish plastic panel for the tonearm and the controls projected out from under the platter, on the right side. The small GT models were mostly sold with this small chassis suspended by springs atop a plinth made from particleboard by an outside vendor, with its upper part finished in silver vinyl veneer, and a dedicated dust cover. The lower part of the plinth was trimmed in imitation wood vinyl veneer. The units sold with plinth and cover were referred to as "modules." However the small GTs were also sold as bare chassis, and could be assembled into consoles and phonographs as replacements for older record changers; these were called "chassis" versions.

The small GTs were built with brand names of phonograph and integrated-system manufacturers, as had been done with the lower-line Autoslim and Unimech models, and with custom model numbers and minor variations, as ordered by large retailers.

The small GT's controls were lined up along the right side of the chassis: a knob adjusted the spring-operated antiskating; a long lever controlled cueing lift/lower; there were shorter levers for operating mode (Off, Manual, Auto, Repeat) and for selection of speed (33/45); and a push button actuated Start/Reject.

The GT-10 was considered by Garrard to be the basic "small GT" model. It had a ten-inch stamped platter. Its tonearm was only partially counterbalanced by a fixed counterweight. Tracking weight was set by a spring that offset the dead weight of the cartridge end of the arm; the spring was adjusted by a knob, with settings assisted by a red pointer and a scale with calibrations at one-gram intervals; users would set the arm so the spring balanced the arm level (zero grams) and then could add weight using the one-gram calibrations as a guide. The cartridge mount was fixed in place, without a removable cartridge clip. Record changing was by a pusher spindle and a record side support to the right rear of the unit.

The GT-10P was a single-play version of the GT-10. It lacked the provision for a tall record-changing spindle, and had no record side support.

The upgrade model was the GT-15. It had a machined aluminum platter and a tonearm with a gimbaled pivot mount and a calibrated counterweight that was adjusted to set tracking weight. The user would balance the tonearm/cartridge, set a calibrated scale on the counterweight to zero without moving the counterweight itself, and then rotate the counterweight inward to the desired tracking weight. It also came in a single-play version, the GT-15P.

There were derivative "custom" models; I am not aware of all of them. As an example there was the GT-4, which was similar to the GT-10 but with a different-design headshell. The GT-12 was a fancied-up GT-10...or if you will, a fancied-down GT-15. It had the gimbaled tonearm of the GT-15 and an adjustable counterweight, with the platter of the GT-10; and its trim differed.

Photos:

GT-10
GT-10, platter removed
GT-10, showing cogged belt looped around center bearing shaft
GT-10P single player, chassis version
GT-10P single player, custom build with special nameplate
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Old 12th Jan 2013, 3:05 pm   #93
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

More photos of small GT models:

GT-15
GT-15 tonearm detail
GT-15 tonearm head detail
GT-15 front view
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Old 12th Jan 2013, 3:24 pm   #94
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

More small GT models:

GT-4
GT-4 panel
GT-12 Mk II
GT-12 showing tonearm
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Old 25th Feb 2013, 5:51 pm   #95
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In the late 1970s, Garrard, its sales in decline as the Unimech record changers proved to be a poor replacement for the Autoslim models, weak in the budget market while unable to perform at the level expected in the entry and midlevel hi-fi market, worked on its last "new" design, the two-speed, belt-drive "Large Delglide" series of automatic turntables. Even this wasn't ALL new; as in the small Delglides, its modular mechanism was redesigned from that of the GT55 models.

Garrard was, by now, committed to the concept of the automatic mechanism as an integrated module. It was less costly to assemble at small-scale facilities instead of on a big, expensive assembly line. The module in the GT55 and the Delglides was an advance on that of the CC10 minichanger and the Unimechs, in that nearly all its mechanical parts were made of low-friction DuPont Delrin® plastic instead of metal stampings, the entire module designed to need no lubrication or maintenance over its entire service life.

The module was mounted directly underneath the pickup arm and was driven from a gear on the center of the platter by a cogged belt. On the large Delglides, separate control subassemblies were outboard of the module, mounted on a full-sized moulded plastic top plate that formed the upper half of the "plinth." The control subassemblies had low-force knobs with steel spring wires actuating the working parts on the modular mechanism. The plastic top plate was mounted on a wooden frame that formed the lower half of the plinth. A fibreboard bottom plate finished off the assembly.

The large Delglide models included fully automatic units with single-record and multiple record-changing capabilities; single-play units requiring the user to set down the tonearm by hand, with automatic end-of-side arm lift/return and shutoff; and a full manual model with manual tonearm setdown and lift. All models had a manual tonearm lift-lower cueing control that was completely separate of the modular mechanism, being operated by a lever controlling a fluid-damped arm-lifting shaft. The modular mechanism itself differed among the different models, with parts removed from the full-automatic record changer version to provide progressively lesser levels of automation. Since the automatic record changer was fast fading in popularity, this allowed Garrard to tailor the design to suit the changing market. The automatic mechanisms themselves performed with impressive smoothness and quietness, without the clicking, snapping and creaking noises often found in earlier automatic turntable mechanisms.

Two motors were used in the belt-drive Delglide series: the lower-priced units had a four-pole induction/synchronous motor identical in principle of operation to the Garrard Synchro-Lab® motor, but not built by Garrard; it was sourced from Matsushita, one of several turntable companies which had licensed Garrard's patent on the induction/synchronous design for their own production. The motor in the top-line models was the permanent-magnet DC motor with electronic servo speed governor circuit from the GT55, the motor also produced by Matsushita, and the electronics built in England in Plessey facilities from the Matsushita design.

The induction/synchronous motor provided good performance. Speed was changed by shifting the position of the belt on a stepped motor pulley; on fully automatic models this also changed the setdown position for the tonearm: 12" for 33 1/3 rpm, 7" for 45 rpm. As in any other belt-drive turntable without a variable speed control, absolute speed accuracy depended on the belt being in good condition and of the proper thickness. Garrard belts were excellent in this regard; I always found speed with a new, genuine Garrard belt to be within 0.3% of nominal. The DC motor with servo control provided slightly lower vibration for a slightly better rumble specification. It was also lower in torque, though this wasn't apparent in normal use due to the electronic speed governor. User-accessible speed adjustment was provided, with a 6% adjustment range; if a belt was fitted that differed in thickness, screwdriver adjustments on the circuit board could be used to bring the 6% adjustment range to the proper ±3%. However, the governor circuit proved to be subject to aging of its components, particularly the electrolytic capacitors. As in the GT55, speed instability would develop and owners junked many units instead of having them repaired. Now, decades after their construction, it is recommended that any of these belt-drive models with the DC servo motor and governor have all the electrolytic capacitors replaced; there are about a dozen, but they are inexpensive parts. I have sold several GT55 and GT35 (and Matsushita-Technics) units acquired as "non-operational" at junk prices, after restoration in just this manner.

The tonearm system of the large Delglides was an excellent one. As in the Unimech subchassis, the horizontal pivot bearings for the tonearm are integral in the modular mechanism. But unlike the Unimech's bearing, which was a crude axle-in-hole with the pivot shaft resting on a spring-loaded ball thrust, the Delglides had an extremely low-friction, sealed ball-bearing assembly sourced from an outside vendor specializing in precision bearings. The tonearms themselves were S-shaped with the standard SME-type bayonet fitting. For vertical motion, they had precision jewelled bearings suspended on preloaded needle pivots mounted in a gimbal-shaped ring. The dynamic mass of the tonearms was reduced to accommodate extremely high-compliance cartridges by a new headshell, the H-1 made of magnesium with a deep "skirt" to provide rigidity. This headshell was among the best ever made for S-shaped tonearms with standard fittings, but its material does tend to take on a dull appearance with age. Tracking weight was controlled by a calibrated counterweight; antiskate was provided by a spring mechanism mounted below the deckplate and controlled by a knob with dual calibrations adjacent to the tonearm base.

Unlike the small Delglides, the large models were supplied only as integrated record players mounted on plinths and dust covers. None were made available as bare chassis for installation in cabinets. Model numbers began at GT20, just above the small Delglides which left off at GT15. Where higher model numbers of the small Delglides represented higher performance tonearms and heavier platters with the same level of automation, those of the large Delglides varied with automatic capabilities, while the platters and tonearms were all essentially the same except for the stroboscopic markings on the GT35 models.

The GT20 was the basic, no-frills version of this series. It had the four-pole, induction/synchronous motor. Its operational controls were only a speed selector, on/off switch and the tonearm lift/lower lever. Being fully-manual it lacked any automatic mechanism at all, having only a tonearm base housing underneath.

The GT25P added automatic tonearm lift at the end of side, automatic tonearm lift in mid-record by means of a REJECT control, and automatic shutoff at end of play. It retained the four-pole, induction/synchronous motor.

The GT35P added the DC motor, electronic servo governor, and speed adjustment to the GT25P. Stroboscope markings on the turntable platter and an LED strobe illuminator were provided for accuracy in adjusting speed.

The GT25 was the fully automatic version of the GT25P, with single record and multiple record-changing capabilities. For multiple record-changing, a tall record spindle would be exchanged for the short manual spindle, and the record stack would be stabilized on a record support platform at the right rear of the turntable unit. It retained the four-pole, induction/synchronous motor and because it had automatic start and tonearm setdown, added a record size selector with 7" and 12" positions, separate from its speed selector.

The GT35 was the fully automatic version of the GT35P, with single record and multiple record changing capabilities as in the GT25; the DC motor and electronic speed governor, speed control and stroboscopic turntable with LED illuminator. Its record size selection was linked to its speed selection: 7" for 45rpm, 12" for 33 1/3 rpm.

The GT25 and GT35 models had ball-race thrust bearings for their platters, due to the need to accommodate a record-changer spindle. The GT20 and the "P" models had a single ball thrust atop a fixed centre shaft, and a thrust pad in the platter.

Conspicuously absent from the large Delglide series was the direct-drive motor. The Garrard DD75 remained, for a time, the only direct-drive Garrard turntable, as the excellent Matsushita direct-drive motor could not be used with the cog-belt drive for the modular mechanism. Later models would combine the modular mechanism with a new, Garrard-built direct-drive motor.

Photos:

GT20. Only two controls: speed selector at left, and On/Off at right.
GT20 tonearm...the same arm as used in the entire series.
GT20 underside, note lack of auto mechanism compared to GT-35 in later post
GT20 control panel: only an on/off switch. This is actually a GT20-1, about which more later.
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Last edited by GP49000; 25th Feb 2013 at 6:14 pm.
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Old 25th Feb 2013, 6:12 pm   #96
GP49000
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

More photos of the Large Delglide models:

GT25P. The On/Off control has been moved and a REJECT control added. Speed selector still at lower left.
GT35P
GT35P controls. Speed selector has been moved to the main panel
GT35P platter off
GT35P strobe and speed adjust controls
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Old 25th Feb 2013, 6:28 pm   #97
GP49000
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

Photos of the fully automatic record changers GT25 and GT35:

GT25. Fully auto version of GT25P, with Off/Manual/Automatic/Repeat control providing for full auto operation, in centre position on main panel. Speed selector at left, Record Size selector added to main panel.

GT25, a specially made version with centre trim disc and ZENITH nameplate (Counterweight is missing).

GT35, full auto version of GT35P with strobe and fine speed adjust at left, Off/Manual/Automatic/Repeat control on main panel. Spindle is missing.

GT35 control panel. Speed control linked to record size selector.

GT35 underside, with full automatic mechanism and cogged belt driving it. The "Delglide" module is the greyish item at lower right. Sharp eyes will notice that this one is labeled "GT25" whose auto mechanism was identical. DC motor and speed control electronics at left.
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Last edited by GP49000; 25th Feb 2013 at 6:37 pm.
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Old 25th Feb 2013, 6:46 pm   #98
Nickthedentist
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

Fascinating stuff as always.

The GT35 really does look very smart indeed. It's always odd to British eyes to see such modern-looking machinea sporting a long spindle. I wonder whether any were sold here.

Did these machines perform well? Were they favourably received by the hifi press? Certainly, in my early-1980s editions of HiFi Choice, the Garrard name is absent, Dual seeming to have cornered the market for low-priced, high-performance units.

Looking forward to the next instalment already.

N.
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Old 25th Feb 2013, 8:58 pm   #99
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

The single play "P" models sold far better than the corresponding record changers in the UK and in Europe. In the USA, only the record changer models were catalogued. But by then, with Garrard in decline against the Japanese and against Dual, which was having major financial difficulties beginning around that time, sales weren't good overall.

The successor models based on the Large Delglides saw a phaseout of their record changer models.

The GT35 got some good reviews but with the brand fading, they didn't help sales much. My GT35 does perform well; I don't know if this is typical, because I acquired it as a junker and have practically reconstructed it completely, including a rebuild of the electronic speed board and a total dismantling and reassembly of the automatic module. It really doesn't require lubrication per se, due to its construction from low-friction plastics; but there IS a tonearm slipclutch that could give problems; mine was slipping. And, as is typical of many manufacturers' tonearm lift designs damped by silicone fluid on a vertical shaft, the tonearm dropped rather abruptly due to the damping fluid flowing under gravity; the silicone fluid needed to be replenished.
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Old 25th Feb 2013, 11:07 pm   #100
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Default Re: Garrard record player deck identification.

I also have a GT35P, I never imagined that there was a changer version.

Sadly, mine has had a hard life. It had been used at a community radio station, and the platter 'leans' slightly to the front left - perhaps due to heavy handedness in (or maybe total unsuitability for) back-cueing. The heavy platter looks nice, but a quick look below shows a less glamourous reality - it sits on a sort of flimsy plastic sub platter/base, presumably there is bearing or shaft wear here in my case - certainly doesn't look designed for any kind of rigourous use.

I had to strip, clean and rebuild the 3v DC motor as it would cut out. The motor itself is not very good quality, looks like the sort of sankyo thing found in cassette decks of the period.
Despite all that, it still soldiers on, so I have a soft spot for it!
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