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Old 6th Jan 2011, 10:54 am   #1
TriMan66
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Default TV tube possible to repair

Hi,

I have a 1959 HMV TV, model M1-A7, I would like to restore but it has a broken tube. The nip on the end of the neck has been broken clean away so there is no vacuum and the phospurous on the inside has started to come away.
I have seen the thread about the trip to RACS but since this is the first time repairing a tube, I'm not sure if mine is too far gone, or if it is still salvagable.
The tube is a Miniwatt AW 53-88 as found in:
http://www.radiomuseum.org/tubes/tube_aw53-88.html
and also used in the following TV:
http://www.radiomuseum.org/r/hismasters_m1_a5.html


regards
Craig
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Old 6th Jan 2011, 11:12 am   #2
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

So long as the neck is not broken close to the bowl, it will be repairable, RACS would re-phoshor the tube anyway after taking it back to clear glass. Whether the cost would be justified is another matter, these Mullard tubes normally hold up quite well, you may well find a used one from someone on here.
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Old 6th Jan 2011, 11:16 am   #3
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

The tube is repairable but it will be expensive! RACS will re-screen it (new phosphor) and aluminize it then fit a new gun assembly.

Every vintage tube is worth saving IMHO but it is down to whether you are willing to spend the money on it. It might be possible to find a substitute tube in the meantime.


Brian

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Old 6th Jan 2011, 5:40 pm   #4
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

I don't know if this might be interesting. It is a local glass blower. The domes they are holding were blown by the couple and I have seen much smaller tv tubes.

I've got a stinking dose of man flu at present but once it clears up I will give Kim and Tom a bell to see if they would be interested in possibly blowing tv tubes.

http://www.wiltshiretimes.co.uk/news...oject/?ref=rss
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Old 7th Jan 2011, 10:54 am   #5
TriMan66
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

Hi,

Thanks for the responses. I will put a call out in the wanted section to see if anyone has one of these tubes before considering having it fixed.

regards
Craig
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Old 7th Jan 2011, 11:07 am   #6
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

Hi Dave.
It's unlikely that the glass blower chaps could help with this type of repair.
There has been some lengthy discussions recently about re-gunning tubes. The tube would need to be re-gunned and re-screened, the AW53-88 is not a hand blown tube anyway.
I am hoping to take tubes to RACS this year but so far the take up is too small to be viable, and if I dont get the numbers by the end of January I will pull the plug. A tube repair from RACS would be about 700 euros including the carriage from RACS to the UK, I was hoping for about 400 all in!
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Old 8th Jan 2011, 12:14 pm   #7
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

Quote:
Originally Posted by TriMan66 View Post
Hi,

I have a 1959 HMV TV, model M1-A7, I would like to restore but it has a broken tube. The nip on the end of the neck has been broken clean away so there is no vacuum and the phospurous on the inside has started to come away.
I have seen the thread about the trip to RACS but since this is the first time repairing a tube, I'm not sure if mine is too far gone, or if it is still salvagable.
The tube is a Miniwatt AW 53-88 as found in:
http://www.radiomuseum.org/tubes/tube_aw53-88.html
and also used in the following TV:
http://www.radiomuseum.org/r/hismasters_m1_a5.html


regards
Craig
That's an EMI F4 or 5 chassis isn't & of course it's an Australian made set as I noticed that the HMV badge is similar to ones I have seen on sets of similar vintage.

I have a few flybacks that I scored when I was living in Dubbo that should fit that set, I also have the service information for that series of chassis as well.
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Old 11th Jan 2011, 9:31 pm   #8
TriMan66
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

Hi daro,

Not sure about the chassis being EMI. It says model M1-A7. It is indeed an Australian set I am trying to restore. I'm doing my best at the moment to find a new tube for it though. You don't have one of these do you?
I'll keep it mind if I need a flyback transformer for it. I'll measure it and see how it is.
I would be very keen to have a copy of the service info. I'll send a PM.
I have attached a few pictures fo the chassis before the damage to the tube.

best regards
Craig
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Old 11th Jan 2011, 9:44 pm   #9
murphyv310
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

There were a number of UK made sets that used the AW53-88 and I am sure you will get one here. They were used throughout Europe and were quite common.
The "Miniwatt" is a Philips tube and sold here as a Mullard.

There are other CRT's you can use EG Mazda CME2108 will work with the exception of the 12.6v heater, which would be fine in a series connected heater chain, or a 2:1 transformer in a parallel circuit.
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Old 13th Jan 2011, 6:50 pm   #10
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

Hi all,

Interesting thread this one!
Does this mean that EMI continued to design and manufacture sets in Australia after their demise in Britain? if so was the design lineage a natural progression from the 1840 (the last true EMI chassis produced in this country AFIK).

From what I can make out from the thumbnails on the Radiomuseum site the construction does look typically EMI, even down to the pitch covered B.Osc. transformers a la 1807!

For how long did the Australian manufacturing outfit continue? I've often wondered what the circuit of an EMI colour set would have been like, or is the image to horrific to contemplate!

Best of luck finding a tube and of course with the restoration, it would be nice to see this descendant of the 1807 producing a picture.

Regards
Eric.
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Old 14th Jan 2011, 8:07 am   #11
AndrewM
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

Hi Eric, your question really needs a thread of its own but I'll give you a brief answer here.

EMI Australia was a successful company during the 1960's and early 70's until its demise and sale to Rank Arena/NEC in 1980. They did develop a colour chassis that was a good performing and reasonably reliable design.

The 1950's TV designs appear to borrow heavily from the UK parent company. By the 1960's I think they had evolved into a unique local design. The early sets used the E and F chassis series which was a horizontal chassis. The M series chassis seen in this thread was the first vertical chassis by the company.

Andrew
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Old 16th Jan 2011, 8:07 pm   #12
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

Hi Andrew,

Thanks for all the info, good to hear that EMI designs lived on for a couple of decades. One last question, does Craig's TV use the 625 line standard or did Australia have an earlier (405?) system.

Regards
Eric.
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Old 16th Jan 2011, 9:34 pm   #13
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

All the Australian TV's including Craig's M1 used the 625 line standard. Australia didn't get a TV service until 1956 and so was able to use a "modern" standard.
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Old 23rd Apr 2011, 8:32 pm   #14
TriMan66
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

Well, after more than 3 months, I now have a replacement AW53-88 tube. I looked for all the English TV sets I could find with this tube and an equivalent. Although they do come up from time to time, it is very hard to find one.
Whilst looking through the Radio Museum web site, I noticed that this is a common tube used in German sets from the late 50's early 60's. I logged onto the German version of a popular auction site and was able to find a set quite easily. It cost 15 Euro for the TV and a further 10 Euro to help with packing and surprisingly only cost 32 to have it courriered from Germany to here! The person selling it was Russian and I suspect was using a translation tool from Russian to German. I was doing the same from German to English with some amusing results. In any case, it arrived well packed and I can now carry on the restoration work. I am determinded to get this TV up and running and really did put a lot of effort into tracking down a tube.
Looking on the foreign version of auction sites was obviously very benefical for me and something others should consider too if they really need something hard to find in the UK.
The TV is a 1959 Grundig 353 with the required AW53-88 picture tube. It had an interesting arrangement with a large main speaker driver and a complementary horn tweeter.

regards
Craig
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Old 23rd Apr 2011, 8:37 pm   #15
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

I hope you're now on the lookout for a nice new tube for that poor old Grundig
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Old 23rd Apr 2011, 8:45 pm   #16
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Default Re: TV tube possible to repair

Hi Craig, I'm just amazed it survived intact, glad you can get your M1-A7 up and running now.

Chris
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