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Old 27th Nov 2017, 10:19 pm   #21
JohnBG8JMB
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Ok on walls - my shed is 150 x 15overlap boards outside, sheet of polythene, then 9mm osb. No insulation and concrete slab floor. if cold, I turn the fan heater on.

Roof is box section steel, which attracts condensation.

Best cheap solution for the roof, please.

&3
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Old 28th Nov 2017, 12:40 am   #22
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Another vote for OSB (Sterling board) with white emulsion on top. Cheap, looks good, very durable. Would only introduce plaster board as another layer if some fire resistance was required, its a pest when fixing things to it, dusty when dry, disgusting when damp.
Most plasterboards are imperial one dimension and metric in the other!
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Old 28th Nov 2017, 12:46 am   #23
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Default Re: Workshop lining

JohnB, consider too, that you will have condensation inside the box sections as well, rusting inside where you can't see it.
Best long term solution though not easy is polyurethane foam spray covering meticulously applied once the steel is dry inside and out.
Anti condensation paint, I think Screwfix do it, may help a bit.
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Old 28th Nov 2017, 10:11 am   #24
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Default Re: Workshop lining

On the steel sections, use red oxide paint.
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Old 28th Nov 2017, 10:41 am   #25
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Default Re: Workshop lining

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Originally Posted by Boater Sam View Post
Another vote for OSB (Sterling board) with white emulsion on top. Cheap, looks good, very durable. Would only introduce plaster board as another layer if some fire resistance was required, its a pest when fixing things to it, dusty when dry, disgusting when damp.
Most plasterboards are imperial one dimension and metric in the other!
The important point being that the width of a full size plasterboard sheet is 1.2 metres and the width of shuttering ply and some OSB is 4ft, like I said, if thinking of fitting both types of sheets to the same studwork there's a trap there for the unwary if you want the sheet joints to be on stud centres as is normal practice. If you had set the stud centres for shuttering ply and fixed the shuttering ply sheets on one side of the studs and then filled between the studs with foam insulation such as Kingspan and worse if you had already fitted a warm side vapour barrier on top of that and worser still if you had fitted noggins then suddenly realizing the blunder...sort of turns into a DIY SOS....

Lawrence.
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Old 28th Nov 2017, 1:23 pm   #26
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Default Re: Workshop lining

But you would screw the plasterboard onto the OSB not just the studs these days and the long edges should be across studs anyway. So a stud centre to centre of 2' is then correct if using 4' X 900mm baseboards or 6' X 900mm or even 8' X 1200mm if man enough.
We used to glue a lot of board rather than nail or screw, its faster, neater and causes less damage to adjacent boards.
If tape and sponge or skim is used as a finish, the boards should be gapped 3mm all round as well.
As an aside, there is a plasterboard product that we used but can't remember its name or maker that is plastic film finished covered on one side, ideal for lining where no other finishing is used, again glue fixed to avoid fixing points showing.
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Old 28th Nov 2017, 3:45 pm   #27
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Default Re: Workshop lining

For the roof, spray-on foam is the best - if thats not an option get Celotex, cut it to size, and fix it to the inside of the roof using "dot-and-dab" with a can of filler foam. Then foam round all the gaps at the edges to prevent ingress of damp.

Not elegant, but it works: I've 'done' a few shipping-containers this way and it makes one hell of a difference - no more "open the door and get an instant rain-shower as the condensation drips off the roof" effect.
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Old 28th Nov 2017, 4:57 pm   #28
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But you would screw the plasterboard onto the OSB not just the studs these days and the long edges should be across studs anyway. So a stud centre to centre of 2' is then correct if using 4' X 900mm baseboards or 6' X 900mm or even 8' X 1200mm if man enough.
We used to glue a lot of board rather than nail or screw, its faster, neater and causes less damage to adjacent boards.
If tape and sponge or skim is used as a finish, the boards should be gapped 3mm all round as well.
As an aside, there is a plasterboard product that we used but can't remember its name or maker that is plastic film finished covered on one side, ideal for lining where no other finishing is used, again glue fixed to avoid fixing points showing.
Fitting plasterboard horizontal is a pain when It comes to DIY finishing to a reasonable standard...Square edge, either fill, sand and wall paper (Hassle) Tape and fill and skim coat (Beyond most DIYers) Tape fill and feather to a wide area (An art in itself) Fit horizontal and vertical joint cover strips (Looks a mess when horizontal ones are used) Vertical joints should be staggered according to whatever is method is employed.

Fitting tapered edged plasterboard horizontal (More of a strain to tape, fill and sand horizontally) Vertical joints (Same problems as square edge unless you fit cover strips) Remember tapered edge is only tapered on the two side edges, top and bottom aren't tapered, they are the finished board thickness.

If a flat finish is required for non tapered joints then those edges can be rebated with a slight taper, just enough so's the outer surface of the scrim will be about 2mm below the paper/plaster line, clean of as much dust as possible without making any more, prime the exposed plaster with diluted PVA and just as it starts to goes off slap the scrim tape on then the first coat of filler (It's an art)

Fixing boards vertically and finishing off...Much easier all round.

I've done horizontal board fixing but only the inner skin of a double skin jobs such as sound blocker (blue) or fire blocker (red) outer skin board was always vertical.

Lawrence.
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Old 28th Nov 2017, 7:08 pm   #29
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Originally Posted by Boater Sam View Post
As an aside, there is a plasterboard product that we used but can't remember its name or maker that is plastic film finished covered on one side, ideal for lining where no other finishing is used, again glue fixed to avoid fixing points showing.
Not plasterboard but could it have been Respatex or similar stuff? Pre finished, waterproof, smooth surface in various colours or designs, fixing screws were hidden within the joint, the joint they employed used to swing lock together, almost seamless if fitted correctly, often used in showers which is where I came to use it back in the day.

Lawrence.
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Old 29th Nov 2017, 12:34 am   #30
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Evening everyone and many, many thanks for all your input.
Perhaps it would help if I post some photos of where I am with this! - however it will have to be tomorrow as my phone is on charge & that's where all my pics have been saved
Best wishes
Guy
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Old 30th Nov 2017, 5:38 pm   #31
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Default Re: Workshop lining

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Originally Posted by mhennessy View Post

As for the prices, you don't state the supplier, but so that we're comparing apples to apples, the B&Q price for 18mm OSB is 24 a sheet. No-doubt available for less elsewhere, but then the same should be true for the spruce ply.
Wickes.
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Old 30th Nov 2017, 9:42 pm   #32
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Wicks currently have it for 24.99 (falling to 21.99 if you buy 3).

But of course, price is but one factor, and not necessarily the more important one

Looking forward to seeing the pictures, Guy
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Old 30th Nov 2017, 10:32 pm   #33
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Price has gone up then since I did my roof!

I've got a garage to re roof and a den to build too yet!
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 12:02 am   #34
JohnBG8JMB
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Originally Posted by G6Tanuki View Post
For the roof, spray-on foam is the best - if thats not an option get Celotex, cut it to size, and fix it to the inside of the roof using "dot-and-dab" with a can of filler foam. Then foam round all the gaps at the edges to prevent ingress of damp.
Celotex is expensive, but I guess 25mm exp polystyrene would work; it's much cheaper.. Either could be fixed to the roof timbers, leaving a 63mm air gap between the insulating sheet and the steel, or directly to the steel leaving no air gap except in the upstanding corrugations; which would be best? Should the corrugations in the steel sheets be sealed at the outside of the shed - at present the upstanding bits are open to the outside?.

73
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 1:08 am   #35
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Quote:
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boater Sam View Post
As an aside, there is a plasterboard product that we used but can't remember its name or maker that is plastic film finished covered on one side, ideal for lining where no other finishing is used, again glue fixed to avoid fixing points showing.
Not plasterboard but could it have been Respatex or similar stuff? Pre finished, waterproof, smooth surface in various colours or designs, fixing screws were hidden within the joint, the joint they employed used to swing lock together, almost seamless if fitted correctly, often used in showers which is where I came to use it back in the day.

Lawrence.
Nope, definitely plasterboard base. Designed for dry fix to industrial ceilings between suspended tee rail. Used tons a long time ago, memory full.
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 9:13 am   #36
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Never come across it, only plasterboard I've fixed to suspended ceiling rails was plasterboard laths on one job and full sheets of sound blocker on another.

Lawrence.
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Old 3rd Dec 2017, 3:49 pm   #37
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Default Re: Workshop lining

The original poster does not say if the workshop is a timber shed, brick outhouse or damp cellar.

If it has brick walls, have you considered fitting insulated plasterboard stuck onto the brick using adhesive foam.

If you want heavy duty weight bearing shelves you may need to fit wooden battens to the wall and remove the foam in that area. Same with wall sockets and conduit.

Foil backed material may turn your shed into a Faraday cage and stop radio signals getting in.
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Old 7th Dec 2017, 2:00 pm   #38
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Apologies for the delay in following up on my original post.

Just to summarise:

The shed is 10'x6', bought via shedmonkey.com and is their 'hipex' (high apex) product. It's built from 12mm tongue & groove boarding.
This has been treated with two applications of 'Barrettine' solvent-based wood preserver and allowed to dry before assembly.
The base is formed of 24 'Ecodeck' plastic interlocking tiles which have been infilled with 100mm gravel; although the area concerned is brick-paved, I wanted to raise the overall height of the base structure off the ground to minimise the risk of early deterioration due to rainfall 'splashback'. This gravel base has in turn been treated with three drenchings of 'Pathclear' to discourage weed growth (unlikely as that might be in almost total darkness) as well as two powderings with ant-powder. There are gaps between the base bearer timbers through which I could get a pressurised weedkiller lance in the future but throughout the project, my consideration has been in terms of a low-maintenance, 'fit once and forget until such time as I fall off my twig' solution.

The current status is as follows:

Internal ceilings & walls have had damp-proof membrane applied followed by wood-fibre board insulation then covered with every-day bubble wrap to minimise 'fibre fall-out' (the green dust from it is evil and gets everywhere if/when disturbed by cutting/stapling).

Original T&G floor has had DPM/wood-fibre insulation applied followed by 18mm MDF covered with a premium-priced off-cut of kitchen floor-grade 'lino' just to make it easy to keep clean (and find/pick up those tiny little screws that when dropped always seem to bounce/somersault three times, each time sounding as though they've landed close by - yet on the last bounce, they fly off into a random area anything up to ten feet away).

I will upload pics soon ... I promise!

Best wishes
Guy
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Old 7th Dec 2017, 3:30 pm   #39
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Default Re: Workshop lining

I've chosen to upload these as zipped folders - each has a sub-folder containing five images and the numbering is sequential so as to keep the date-coding consistent.

First set of five; four more to follow.

There's a passing nod to one of my favourite films in there as well and I offer a small Christmas gift of the liquid variety to the first person who identifies it

Cheers

Guy
Attached Files
File Type: zip Batch 01.zip (1.69 MB, 41 views)
File Type: zip Batch 02.zip (1.32 MB, 29 views)
File Type: zip Batch 03.zip (1.40 MB, 32 views)
File Type: zip Batch 04.zip (917.9 KB, 23 views)
File Type: zip Batch 05.zip (987.2 KB, 37 views)
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Last edited by Nymrod121; 7th Dec 2017 at 3:34 pm. Reason: corrected number of zipped folders
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Old 7th Dec 2017, 3:33 pm   #40
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Second set of four.
That's it for now; progress is on hold pending approval by SWMBO of the C.E.P. (Capital Expenditure Proposal) re. plywood linings plus white paint.
Cheers
Guy
Attached Files
File Type: zip Batch 06.zip (1.11 MB, 23 views)
File Type: zip Batch 07.zip (1,012.8 KB, 21 views)
File Type: zip Batch 08.zip (850.6 KB, 19 views)
File Type: zip Batch 09.zip (906.5 KB, 36 views)
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