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Old 27th Nov 2017, 3:48 pm   #1
Nymrod121
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Default Workshop lining

I need to line the inside of my W.I.P. (Workshop In Progress) with a suitable form of wallboarding that will act as a general purpose fixing surface for sockets etc. as well as having a thermal insulating effect/plain white decorative finish.

Contiboard seems very expensive; plywood would need further effort and materials to present a matt white finish. Any ideas / suggestions would be welcome!

Thanks & best wishes
Guy
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 4:19 pm   #2
Bazz4CQJ
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Default Re: Workshop 'equipment'

Something that I've recently been looking at as a cheap form of insulation is some stuff called 'antiknox'. It's like corrugated cardboard, except that it's made of black PVC, about~3mm thick. Quite tough and water-resistant

It is intended to be used by construction workers to protect partly finished installations of bathrooms and kitchen etc, absorbing the effects of physical knocks and it's pretty cheap; mine came from Hombase but similar products are available elsewhere. Don't have any thermal data on it, but as it is largely trapped air, it cannot be too conductive.

B
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 4:49 pm   #3
G6Tanuki
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Clad the walls with Celotex to provide the thermal insulation [you can get damaged sheets really cheap from builders merchants, fine if you're going to cut them up into smaller bits to do a shed/workshop].

Then look at "shuttering ply" as the internal surface: it's not beautiful but it is strong and cheap. Wallpaper over it if you don't like the way it looks! [Local B&Q were selling off gone-out-of-fashion wallpaper for 99p/roll recently]
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 4:50 pm   #4
merlinmaxwell
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Plasterboard over battens, anything else will annoy you for ever more. To finish, fill the gaps and wallpaper with end of line vinyl. For sockets etc. a run of dado trunking right round the shop.
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 5:21 pm   #5
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Default Re: Workshop lining

I'm just lining our new potting shed - 100mm cavity wall insulation bats between the uprights with 9mm ply over the top. Will probably varnish the ply to make it semi-waterproof.
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 5:30 pm   #6
M0FYA Andy
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Guy, use ply over Celotex insulation. The only 'further effort and materials to present a matt white finish' amounts to emulsion paint and a brush! That's what I used in my workshop, I used 12mm ply.
Andy
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 6:55 pm   #7
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Line with plasterboard, make the partion behind to fix the board to.

I wouldn't use ply as ply de-laminates with time, moisture in the air and temperature. If you do want a substantial board to fix things to, then use OSB3.
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 7:00 pm   #8
Lloyd 1985
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Default Re: Workshop lining

My workshop walls consist of a 4" x 2" timber frame, outside is finished with pine floorboarding painted with several layers of shed / fence paint, under that is a breathable membrane moisture barrier. In between the frame is insulation, 50mm Recticel (foam with foil on both sides, similar stuff to Cellotex and Kingspan, but cheaper! Think it might be Jewson's own brand) inside walls are Sterling board, just because I bought loads of it as the plywood we bought for the floor was abysmal quality... It makes a good strong surface to fix sockets to and is also great for screwing wall mounted shelving to where ever you want it. It's a sod to paint it though! If you are not bothered about strength, plasterboard is cheap and easy to work with, no need to paint it unless it's dirty. I think you can also get plasterboard with a foil backing on it, maybe even some with insulation on it too.

The Recticel insulation comes in other sizes, I think the smallest was 20mm, up to 100mm.

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Old 27th Nov 2017, 7:04 pm   #9
Sinewave
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lloyd 1985 View Post
the plywood we bought for the floor was abysmal quality...
Most ply is. The large 8x4 sheets are shuttering ply, they're not made for a 'finish'. It's not cabinet ply, or 'furniture' quality.
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 7:48 pm   #10
Lloyd 1985
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Default Re: Workshop lining

I think that is where I went wrong, buying shuttering ply. It was ok for the roof, but the floor was too springy so we put OSB on top of the ply. It seemed to be made up of only 4 layers in a 12mm thick board, there were loads of voids in it and it was more warped than some of my Dads old records after spending several summers in the loft!

Regards,
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 7:53 pm   #11
mhennessy
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Default Re: Workshop lining

OSB is cheap and performs well. Cover with 9mm plasterboard - also cheap. With the OSB underneath, there's no need to worry about using specialist plasterboard fixings.

Don't forget a vapour barrier on the warm side of the insulation between the studs. And remember not to puncture it when attaching things to the walls - so the thicker the OSB, the better

I wouldn't use Contiboard or chipboard in any form (apart from OSB) as it doesn't do well in the damp.

In my cellar, I've had good results with spruce ply - available for about 30 (4' by 8' sheet, 18mm thick) in B&Q, so presumably much cheaper anywhere else. It won't finish brilliantly, but is easy to cut and machine, and putting that under the plasterboard should work well structurally. I don't know if it would be any better than OSB though...
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 8:25 pm   #12
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Default Re: Workshop lining

I recently insulated my workshop/shed using battens then a type of bubble wrap with foil on both sides, and then Stirling board. I decided not to paint the sterling board as I found it had a very unsatisfactory finish ( I did a test piece first).
I note that Lloyd painted his Stirling board, post 8? How did the finish look?
Cheers
John
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 8:29 pm   #13
Sinewave
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Default Re: Workshop lining

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Originally Posted by mhennessy View Post
In my cellar, I've had good results with spruce ply - available for about 30 (4' by 8' sheet, 18mm thick) in B&Q, so presumably much cheaper anywhere else. It won't finish brilliantly, but is easy to cut and machine, and putting that under the plasterboard should work well structurally. I don't know if it would be any better than OSB though...
No it wouldn't be better than OSB3. OSB3 is structural, regular ply isn't.
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 8:31 pm   #14
Sinewave
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Default Re: Workshop lining

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Originally Posted by Lloyd 1985 View Post
I think that is where I went wrong, buying shuttering ply. It was ok for the roof, but the floor was too springy so we put OSB on top of the ply. It seemed to be made up of only 4 layers in a 12mm thick board, there were loads of voids in it and it was more warped than some of my Dads old records after spending several summers in the loft!
I'd never use ply for a roof either. It in some cases can be the cause of a leaking roof.
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 8:43 pm   #15
mhennessy
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Default Re: Workshop lining

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Originally Posted by Sinewave View Post
No it wouldn't be better than OSB3. OSB3 is structural, regular ply isn't.
Spruce ply is structural: http://www.diy.com/departments/spruc...m/27595_BQ.prd
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 9:10 pm   #16
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Yes, Spruce ply isn't regular ply, it's the stuff for racking boards for timber framed houses amongst other things.

Don't forget that if using shuttering ply or OSB and plasterboard on the same wall that the shuttering ply will be in imperial as are some supplies of OSB where as the plasterboard will be metric, there's a trap for the unwary there.

Lawrence.
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 9:27 pm   #17
Sinewave
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Default Re: Workshop lining

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Yes, so that's sctructural ply, where as I said regular ply, which is the ply people have problems with.

Structural ply, 33 per sheet.
OSB3 (which is structural) 18 per sheet.
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 9:56 pm   #18
M0FYA Andy
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Guy,
I think this is another case of where if you ask ten people for an opinion you'll get eleven different answers!
Andy
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 10:00 pm   #19
ms660
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Default Re: Workshop lining

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Originally Posted by Sinewave View Post
Yes, so that's sctructural ply, where as I said regular ply, which is the ply people have problems with.
You can use shuttering ply for a floor on joists or battens, 16" centres for 18mm and 12" centres for 12mm, I've used both thicknesses, 18mm for the floor on joists in the garden chalet and 12mm for the floor on battens in a woodland cabin, both well used, all still solid, no warpy warpy.

When people have problems using "regular ply" it's usually because they don't know what they're doing.

Lawrence.
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Old 27th Nov 2017, 10:18 pm   #20
mhennessy
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinewave View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhennessy View Post
Yes, so that's sctructural ply, where as I said regular ply, which is the ply people have problems with.

Structural ply, 33 per sheet.
OSB3 (which is structural) 18 per sheet.
It appears that you missed the word "spruce" in my original message and assumed I was suggesting regular ply - in which case you would have been quite correct to call me out for making a bad recommendation - but I was quite specific about using spruce ply...

As for the prices, you don't state the supplier, but so that we're comparing apples to apples, the B&Q price for 18mm OSB is 24 a sheet. No-doubt available for less elsewhere, but then the same should be true for the spruce ply.

But like I said earlier, I've no idea which would be best for Guy's application - that would depend on variables we don't yet know... I can say that the spruce ply I got from B&Q had one half-decent side that takes paint reasonably well after a light sanding, so that might save the cost of plasterboard - certainly, it's worth trying it first. If I was using OSB, then I'd definitely have to include the plasterboard layer because personally I wouldn't be happy with painted OSB. Obviously, that's a personal preference thing...

But don't forget the vapour barrier
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