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Old 30th Aug 2017, 12:54 pm   #21
Brigham
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Default Re: 1960's Tricity Viscount cooker

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Originally Posted by kirstyd View Post
I use a belling cooker that was my parents [they bought it new in 1969] works perfectly and is built like a tank.
All BELLING gear seems to be first-class; and the Belling 47 was Britain's best-selling electric cooker for YONKS. It had an inner glass door before anyone had even heard of such a thing.
If I ever had to get a modern cooker, it would be a Belling 47.
For now, I'm very pleased with my Jackson.
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Old 30th Aug 2017, 1:50 pm   #22
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Default Re: 1970's Tricity Viscount cooker

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Cookers should not be connected with PVC 2 & E cable. Butyl flex is the modern recommendation.
Yes, but ISTR someone here (Lucian?) saying that you also need crimped-on ferrules as it's stranded.
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Old 30th Aug 2017, 9:17 pm   #23
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Default Re: 1970's Tricity Viscount cooker

I would have thought that crimped on ferrules would a "nice to have" rather than a "must have". A "must not have" is of course tinned ends.
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Old 30th Aug 2017, 9:47 pm   #24
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Default Re: 1970's Tricity Viscount cooker

All set up and working - without crimping (and no tin!)
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 2:22 pm   #25
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Default Re: 1960's Tricity Viscount cooker

Another Belling fan here. I used to have an early 1980`s format cooker which was one of the first to have 4 halogen hobs, and it was solid/heavy.

I sold it, for the pitiful sum of 50 3 years ago (still in amazing condition/working order) because I fancied something new. I bought Zanussi.................

I stuck it for 18 months and could stick it no more, there were so many design issues with it that I stopped using it completely in the end because it was a pain in the backside - the list is too long and I can't be bothered to write a novel but it was all because of cheapness.

Then as I was at my wits end and looking at changing it again, Ebay came to the rescue. I managed to stumble across another Belling Format cooker, from the late 80`s, BRAND SPANKING NEW!! It took a 500 mile round trip to collect it but I was delighted to go back to something decent and solidly built
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 3:21 pm   #26
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Default Re: 1970's Tricity Viscount cooker

Every cooker terminal box that I have seen is designed for the wire to be wrapped around the stud and contained within shaped washers as the nut is tightened.
BEAB approval specified cable replacement with "normal" hand tools eg. screwdriver and pliers, only so that would rule out any compunction to use crimps in my opinion.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 5:46 pm   #27
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Default Re: 1970's Tricity Viscount cooker

We had one of those when I still lived with my parents. I think it was the only one they ever had and it lasted for years. There were five of us in the house so it would have had some heavy use too. Since replacing that one when they decided on a new kitchen, there have been several cookers. 'Nuff said! I'm not sure if you can still get those old elements but I think I may still have a couple lying round from when I used to replace a lot of them.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 6:30 pm   #28
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Default Re: 1960's Tricity Viscount cooker

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Originally Posted by steptoesyard View Post
Another Belling fan here. I used to have an early 1980`s format cooker which was one of the first to have 4 halogen hobs, and it was solid/heavy.
My Gran probably has exactly the same cooker, also from the 80's I would guess. The hobs/oven may not be as fast to heat up as our newer Zanussi but the quality is certainly higher and, of course, everything works. Even the VFD is still nice and bright.
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Old 2nd Sep 2017, 5:31 pm   #29
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Default Re: 1970's Tricity Viscount cooker

I'm not sure whether it was I who mentioned bootlace ferrules, but they are preferred when connecting fine-stranded (flexible) cables to some types of terminals that are intended for solid or 7-stranded installation cables. Those in certain brands of cooker switch and outlet box, for example, tend to shear off some of the strands or allow them to escape past the screw, when terminating fine stranded flex. Cage-clamp terminals and stud terminals with cable-retaining cup washers are usually OK for either stranded or flexible without rings or ferrules.

Insulation of sheathed heating elements has always been a rather variable quanitity. Some deteriorate with age, disuse and exposure to moisture without any tendency to improve with use. Others recover to nearly their original value if they are regularly run up to full temperature, although during warm-up the insulation may plummet to a few tens of kilohms as the accumulated moisture is driven from the warm middle to condense at the cold ends. Then once the element is fully hot it begins to redistribute again, slowly escaping into the atmosphere. It's the warmup process that is most likely to trip an RCD, which of course prevents further drying of the element to the point where the insulation is high again.

There is no universal requirement for a fixed appliance to be RCD protected, provided certain criteria are met within the installation. This will include a suitably low earth-loop impedance (not usually achievable on TT / rod earths) and cabling installed in such a way as to be unlikely to sustain hidden damage (e.g. not buried less than 50mm deep in a wall). Any point leaking more than 10mA should have a high-integrity earth connection.
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Old 2nd Sep 2017, 5:41 pm   #30
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Default Re: 1970's Tricity Viscount cooker

HI Guys.

Here is some info on the ring, that has been in my shed for years and its time to go and still sealed. FOC
If a few people want it I will run a hat, I have no Idea what the post will be so you will have to take a chance on post after been packed whether it will be worth it.

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Old 15th Oct 2017, 3:33 pm   #31
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Default Re: 1970's Tricity Viscount cooker

A tip on radiant elements. Heat them up in the oven for 15 minutes or so before fitting them. They seem to attract moisture when stored unused which will trip the RCD as soon as they start to get warm when used. Once cleared it doesn't build up again.

I have had this happen several times with my Creda Cavalier with elements I have stored myself in a living room cupboard and with ones bought "new" and fitted.
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Old 15th Oct 2017, 9:39 pm   #32
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Default Re: 1970's Tricity Viscount cooker

I remember when I started my apprenticeship with the EMEB, I never finished it though, being told by the instructor that MI cable and new cooker elements insulated with magnesium oxide could read practically short to outer casing as the magnesium oxide is hydroscopic and absorbs water. As PaulR says heating them up before use will drive out the moisture.
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Old 16th Oct 2017, 9:37 am   #33
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Default Re: 1970's Tricity Viscount cooker

That explains it then. I wonder how many have been scrapped because of that since RCDs have become common
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