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Old 31st Aug 2017, 11:02 am   #41
brenellic2000
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Default Re: Woodworm damaged cabinets

Don't use sump oil - its full of acids! The only reason people use sump oil of paraffin is because they are not prepared to do the job properly.... likewise so called CCA/Tanalised posts.

CCA salts are fixed - they don't leach out so are harmless to the immediate area. The tin based chemical (can't for the life of me remember its name!) deserves to be banned.

Many CCA/tanalised posts rot simply because they were never properly vac-vac treated in the first place - penny pinching cheapskates! We used the Bethell full-cell pressure impregnation at 250psi. (BS specs are by gallons/cu.ft not depth of penetration which can only be determined by destructive testing! Vac-Vac gives limited penetration.

Larch is naturally durable and will last up 20/25 years in ground contact without treatment! But many 'larch' posts are nothing more than common fir whitewoods while the new water-borne treatments are intentionally pretty useless to be 'safe'!!

Sue Butcher will likely know of the 'Turpentine' tree in Oz - it naturally repels white ants and sea-worms and was thus much used in marine work. In the 1890s some bright spark patented whale oil treatment for marine work as whales don't get attacked by sea-worms (honest)! His son likely recommended used paraffin and engine oil!

Drink turpentine and it will kill you; but you'll survive paraffin and paraffin wax!

Wood doesn't need protection from sun or water! Linseed oil will retard UV degradation while intelligent design prevents the trapped water which encourages insect and fungal attack! Back to square one!!!
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 11:18 am   #42
brenellic2000
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Just seen Lawence's post - Cundy debarkers.... corr! happy days!

Yes indeed, the heartwood of chestnut and English oak is impossible to pressure impegnate hence oak stave for coopered whisky barrels.... but Red Oak is porous throughout... and so is not used for barrels! There is also a major difference between decorative veneers (crown cut - which can't absorb much liquid into the cells) and rotary cut for the plywood cores.

It's a fascinating subject, wood and forestry!
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 11:27 am   #43
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Default Re: Woodworm damaged cabinets

TBTO. (the tin stuff)

Larch is durable but that can vary between the species, home grown European larch V Jap larch...no contest.

Lawrence.

Last edited by ms660; 31st Aug 2017 at 11:37 am.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 12:00 pm   #44
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On of my books mentions that some types of pre-war plywood are so nourishing that the furniture beetle can complete its life cycle in 12 months rather than the 2 years or more that is usual in solid timber. Certainly the traditional hydrocarbon-based stuff I have used has been 100% effective. No experience with the water-based replacements.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 12:10 pm   #45
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"Just seen Lawence's post - Cundy debarkers.... corr! happy days!"

Yeah, me too unless a bent one got you in the chops!

Lawrence.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 12:13 pm   #46
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Can we return to the subject of wormy radio cabinets please.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 12:30 pm   #47
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Importing a cabinet with woodworm into a house that's "dry" shouldn't be a problem, eventually any beasties in the cabinet will die or emerge and sod off to somewhere more moist if the spiders don't get them first.

Lawrence.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 4:40 pm   #48
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I passed up on a HMV set a carboot last sunday because I didn't have time to deal with it immediately, and it had fresh flight holes visible.

Assuming it's kept indoors, would it have been safe? And by "indoors", I assume we mean a heated part of the house, rather than a loft? I'd hate to get worm in the loft joists
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 5:35 pm   #49
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I've just bought a Ferguson TV with a load of worm holes in the cabinet, so far all I've done is strip out the chassis and soak the inside of the cabinet in some spirit based woodworm and anti-rot liquid, I also injected it into all the flight holes, to try and get the stuff soaked in everywhere possible. It's possible that the problem had already been successfully treated, but it doesn't hurt to do it again.

I did have a problem in a TV22 where they had been eating the 2 little wooden bits on the sides of the chassis, I soaked them in worm killer, the next day there were a load more holes and sawdust! I guess they didn't like the stuff so decided to try and get out as quickly as possible! After that I took the 2 bits of wood and put them in a food bag and chucked half a can of worm killer into it. Not had a problem since with that set!

I wonder about some treatments like freezing or heating cabinets, if it would damage them? Especially if they are rexine covered or have a good original varnish or French polish that you don't want to have to redo. If only microwaves were bigger...

Regards,
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 8:04 pm   #50
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My understanding is that the furniture beetle only emerges in June/July, so this year's batch should have emerged by now. If there are any larvae still in the wood, then beetles will not emerge until next year. There would be the possibility of larvae eating their way out of an infested item and into a wooden surface (eg table, floorboards) it is resting on and spreading infestation that way. A work colleague once remarked on how he had some old furniture that had been repaired with a metal plate, and when it was removed, you could see minute dimples in the metal where the larvae had tried to continue eating their way through.

Last edited by emeritus; 31st Aug 2017 at 8:14 pm.
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Old 1st Sep 2017, 2:06 pm   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulsherwin View Post
[Later] Just checked and naphthalene mothballs were banned in the EU in 2008.

[Even later] Despite this, I've just successfully bought some from a UK supplier, so it looks as if the rules aren't being enforced.
My mothballs arrived today, and certainly smell like napthalene, so they do still seem to be available, albeit in a nudge-nudge under-the-counter sort of way. The packaging was completely Chinese, which is probably as illegal as the napthalene. (I think napthalene mothballs have actually been banned in China too, though given some of the dodgy chemicals they make there a bit of napthalene is hardly a major issue).

The health risks seem to mostly apply to small children swallowing them, so anyone buying them should take appropriate precautions.
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Old 8th Sep 2017, 3:22 am   #52
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Default Re: Woodworm damaged cabinets

They got around the "funny gobstopper" danger in Australia by selling the mothballs only in plastic cages for hanging in the wardrobe. It's been at least twenty years since I've seen them sold loose.
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