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Vintage Radio (domestic) Domestic vintage radio (wireless) receivers only.

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Old 13th May 2024, 6:41 pm   #1
John10b
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Default Pye M78

Hope this is correct section to talk about the above.
Watching the Antiques Road show last night, not sure if it was a repeat, they presented and talked about the above Radio, and it’s controversial history.
I was very surprised when it was suggested that it was worth over £1000.
I would be interested to know what folk know and think about this.
John
PS. I know David spoke about this many years ago.
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Old 13th May 2024, 6:47 pm   #2
paulsherwin
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Default Re: Pye M78

They are rare and do fetch very high prices if in mint cosmetic condition. I'm not sure why, but they seem to appeal to specialist collectors with deep pockets, a bit like the round Ekcos.

https://www.bonhams.com/auction/1903...eptember-1948/

Accidentally redesigning the prewar sunburst fret to look like the wartime Japanese flag was a huge foot-in-mouth job in 1948, with memories of the Burma Railway and emaciated British POWs still fresh in everybody's minds. Japan remained toxic in Britain until the 60s, with some resistance to Japanese manufactured goods continuing into the 70s.
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Old 13th May 2024, 7:36 pm   #3
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Default Re: Pye M78

I have an M78F bought in the mid 80's and it will probably be with me to the end.

It's not a particularly good radio its compact size brings many compromises.

But it a good looker and small.

You can see that a lot of effort was made to use modern material and create a pleasing form. If I have to compare it to another set of the period where a similar amount of effort was expended I would think of the EKCO princess P63.

Its possibly not as rare as often suggested when I was keeping track 20 or so years ago there were at least 40 survivors which seems an unrealistic survival rate if only 200 were sold as per the story in RadioRadio.

You can see mine 1/3 of the way down on the right here : http://www.cossor.co.uk/about-me-and...r-battery-sets

PS I am not a specialist collector and my pockets contain more moths than money.

Whenever money comes out of my pocket my wife swears the Queen still blinks.

Cheers

Mike T
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Old 13th May 2024, 9:29 pm   #4
greg_simons
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Default Re: Pye M78

Quote:
Originally Posted by paulsherwin View Post
Accidentally redesigning the prewar sunburst fret to look like the wartime Japanese flag was a huge foot-in-mouth job in 1948, with memories of the Burma Railway and emaciated British POWs still fresh in everybody's minds. Japan remained toxic in Britain until the 60s, with some resistance to Japanese manufactured goods continuing into the 70s.
Puts me in mind of one of our customers way back in the seventies, I think he'd been on the death railway and loathed the Japanese with a passion, wouldn't have any Far Eastern goods in the house, that's how strongly people felt about them back then.

Greg.
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Last edited by Station X; 13th May 2024 at 9:38 pm. Reason: Quote fixed. Please use the preview button before submitting a post.
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Old 13th May 2024, 10:04 pm   #5
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Default Re: Pye M78

Quote:
Originally Posted by greg_simons View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by paulsherwin View Post
Accidentally redesigning the prewar sunburst fret to look like the wartime Japanese flag was a huge foot-in-mouth job in 1948, with memories of the Burma Railway and emaciated British POWs still fresh in everybody's minds. Japan remained toxic in Britain until the 60s, with some resistance to Japanese manufactured goods continuing into the 70s.
Puts me in mind of one of our customers way back in the seventies, I think he'd been on the death railway and loathed the Japanese with a passion, wouldn't have any Far Eastern goods in the house, that's how strongly people felt about them back then.

Greg.
Yes some people directly involved really hated the Japanese a chap called Fred big Gramophone collector Tunbridge wells was a Japanese POW could not believe I would drive a Japanese car,

However the majority of the population were unaware of how badly Japanese POWS were treated and personally I doubt the Japanese flag story.

I am no historian but my understanding is the normal Japanese flag of the time was a white flag with a red dot, the alternative having radial beams in all directions and no sea below.

Its more likely IMHO that it just sold poorly due to its inherent flaws and relatively poor performance resulted in poorer sales than EverReady and Vidor and if you wanted a small set there was the likes of the P20B Marconiphone


Just my take without any evidence.

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Old 13th May 2024, 10:46 pm   #6
Lloyd 1985
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Default Re: Pye M78

It’s a set that’s been on my most wanted list for a long time, doubt I’ll ever even see one in the flesh, never mind actually own one. I have only seen one on eBay in recent years, I think it went for just over £500.
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Old 14th May 2024, 12:03 am   #7
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Default Re: Pye M78

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Originally Posted by Lloyd 1985 View Post
I have only seen one on eBay in recent years, I think it went for just over £500.
I've not been watching eBay at all intently, but that doesn't surprise me and I'm very intrigued as to how Mike established the existence of 40+ examples! A few sets generally regarded as difficult to find have found their way to me in the course of 56 years of looking, but I've never met with one of these. I quite expect a pretty good survival rate of the examples that were sold, as with other attractive compact models that were costly to run, in some cases requiring battery types that soon vanished from the market, but easy to tuck away somewhere and forget about once retired from use.

Paul
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Old 18th May 2024, 8:58 pm   #8
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Default Re: Pye M78

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_RK View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lloyd 1985 View Post
I have only seen one on eBay in recent years, I think it went for just over £500.
I've not been watching eBay at all intently, but that doesn't surprise me and I'm very intrigued as to how Mike established the existence of 40+ examples! A few sets generally regarded as difficult to find have found their way to me in the course of 56 years of looking, but I've never met with one of these. I quite expect a pretty good survival rate of the examples that were sold, as with other attractive compact models that were costly to run, in some cases requiring battery types that soon vanished from the market, but easy to tuck away somewhere and forget about once retired from use.

Paul
Back in the late 1990's at a Harpy meeting in the cafe area I was at a table with a couple of friends and we were discussing the M78F as there were 3 examples for sale on one stall at that event, something I had never seen before. I was talking with a group of 3 others one of whom also had an M78F he knew 2 others with the set in fact one had 3 examples himself. During the course of the meeting others knew others who knew others. It seemed including the 3 in the hall we could account for 26 examples which was a surprise so we had to make sure there was no double counting. At that point in time we could solidly identify 26 examples. We then tried to work out how many were in collections of non BVWS members or members we did not identify. so we settled on 40 examples held in collections.

So in answer to Pauls question a bit of he said she said and guesswork.

The worst thing is that most of those members are now passed on with no indication where their collections went. I think in the last 20 years I see one M78F for sale per year. I did own a second one briefly in the early 00's but decided to sell it on as it had a small crack and no handle and it was the same colour as the one I already had.

There have been discussions on the forums of other rare sets such as the Ever Ready Sky FM Sky Monarch I think the Radiomuseum info is out of date and there are currently 6 known survivors (one of which is mine).

I suspect there are a few more kicking around.

Cheers

Mike T
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Old 18th May 2024, 9:26 pm   #9
stevehertz
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Default Re: Pye M78

I wanted one for a long time and placed a wanted here on this forum. Nothing came forth for at least a year then out of the blue I had a private message from a gentleman who had inherited one from his father and had stumbled across my ad in a search and had joined the forum in order to make contact. We exchanged phone numbers etc and a deal was struck and he sent me the radio.

They're absolute pigs to work on and I got about halfway through restoring mine before stopping, to be completed.

I've followed selling prices and I think the antiques roadshow estimate of £1200 is high. I'd say between £600 and £900 in general. Of course you'll find exceptions as you do with any auction when two people with deep pockets slug it out.

But yes - as I discovered - they are out there and you can pick them up for reasonable prices, you just have to be dogged and inventive in your quest, and of course, patient.
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