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Old 4th Oct 2020, 2:54 pm   #21
emeritus
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

That's how I discovered the effect Polyclens had on plastic!
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Old 4th Oct 2020, 8:56 pm   #22
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

--Hot melt glue sticks are sometimes successful with difficult plastics. I have just used one to join PA6 (Nylon?) to an unidentified hard plastic item (which is so old it does not have a recycling mark..only time will tell if it had worked.)

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Old 5th Oct 2020, 8:22 am   #23
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

I've used Humbrol model glue quite successfully.
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Old 9th Oct 2020, 10:36 am   #24
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

I’ve had success repairing Psion organiser hinges with superglue. The break is a narrow strip of plastic with a lot of strain, and I’ve not found a solvent adhesive which works.

Butt join the broken parts with “neat” superglue. This gets the part in its correct position, but the fix is very weak.

Make a “fillet” of superglue around the break, the glue is a reasonably viscous liquid at this point, and easy to shape. Now sprinkle superglue filler powder onto the superglue - the glue and powder mix hardens very quickly, and makes a strong joint.

The filler powder is readily available, and sold, amongst other things, for repairing plastic car bumpers, so should be reasonably effective. I believe baking powder works in a similar way, but I haven’t tried it - maybe someone on here has knowledge of the chemistry involved.

Stuart
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Old 10th Oct 2020, 10:20 am   #25
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

Quote:
Polyethene needs a solvent adhesive, such as that sold for solvent welding polythene waste pipes.
Absolutely not. Solvent welding pipes are PVC.

There is no satisfactory glue for polythene or polypropylene. The only good way to bold them is welding. Yes, really. I was taught to do this by an expert plastic fabricator.

The welding "torch" is a heat gun which was very like a modern surface-mount rework station. It emits a narrow jet of very hot air. The welding rod has to be 100% compatible with the plastic being welded which means you either just bought brand new material, or you have to use a spare strip of the actual plastic you are fixing. After that it is pretty much like flame-welding of steel - but less hot.

Most other plastics can be fixed by epoxy in my experience.
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Old 12th Oct 2020, 12:52 am   #26
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

There used to be a sort of metal flag which went on soldering irons. You put it between two plastic parts to be welded, let it melt their surfaces, then withdraw it, letting the faces come into contact. OK for small things in polythene. I had one on an Antex.

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Old 12th Oct 2020, 3:20 pm   #27
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

I've had good luck bonding polypropylene with 'glue gun' hot glue. It works well for the children's garden toys which have a fairly hard life.

For really difficult plastic repairs, I've used a cement called Scotch-Weld 8005 before. It sticks PEVA (also used in a lot of baby-related things) and other waxy plastics quite well. My biggest triumph was re-sticking the sole of a cross-country ski boot back on. It was made of something really slippery, maybe polypropylene, and had come clean off the bottom of the boot. The bond has to withstand the entire stress of someone skiing, and it worked. The down side is that the adhesive cost almost as much as a new boot would have done, but I'd borrowed it from a friend so wanted to make good!

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Old 12th Oct 2020, 6:04 pm   #28
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

One of the most impressive glues I've used recently was Stormsure Flexible Repair Adhesive, which is essentially a one component flexible polyurethane.

As an experiment - I had a pair of Wellingtons that must be at least 25 years old, and that had split almost completely across the full width of the sole, directly under the ball of the foot, where it bends the most - they were ready for the bin, but I tried the Stormsure product on that split, just to see what it would do; 18 months later, they're still in reguar use, and completely watertight.

As a urethane, provided the surfaces are clean, roughened, and degreased, it'll stick like the proverbial to almost anything... but it's also a flexible product, so not ideal for everything.

Alan
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Old 13th Oct 2020, 3:17 pm   #29
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

I tentatively used (clear) hot-melt glue stick to stick PA6 (Nylon 6?) to whatever the red body of the drill is made of (acrylic? polypropylene? ABS? feels too flimsy to be polycarbonate)

It is surprisingly solid. I thoroughly roughed up both surfaces but they were by no means flat- maximum surface area contact couldn't have been more than 40 or 50%.

(Stating the obvious for lithium batteries this appliance is not kept indoors for safety reasons; the battery pack had to be adapted for installation upside down to accommodate the charger. It is very much a bodge but won't short out at the base as the terminals are recessed.)

Dave
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Old 13th Oct 2020, 5:46 pm   #30
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldie99 View Post
As a urethane, provided the surfaces are clean, roughened, and degreased, it'll stick like the proverbial to almost anything... but it's also a flexible product, so not ideal for everything.

Alan
The expanding polyurethane foams certainly stick pretty well to many materials and can also be used on damp/wet surfaces, water apparently assisting the chemical reaction.

B
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Old 17th Oct 2020, 10:49 pm   #31
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

The RGD R130 is a hard plastic case, not one of those waxy soft poly-something plastics.
Most plastics glues intended for hard plastics should work.
I use superglue.
Having said that I have never had any success of gluing the plastic pillars back and expecting any glue to hold when the case is screwed up.
I scrape the surrounding plastic and the pillar to roughen it, glue the pillar in place with superglue, then use a good quality epoxy glue to build up a thick fillet all around the pillar and the case.
I do not use quick set Araldite epoxy it is rubbish and stays soft enough to tear even after days..
Use a high quality slow setting epoxy. There is not much point in mentioning the type I use because it is no longer available. But it was made by SP systems, and comes in 2 tins one a dark grey paste and the other a white paste.

Mike
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Old 17th Oct 2020, 10:55 pm   #32
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

Quote:
Originally Posted by crackle View Post
The RGD R130 is a hard plastic case, not one of those waxy soft poly-something plastics.
Most plastics glues intended for hard plastics should work.
I use superglue.
Having said that I have never had any success of gluing the plastic pillars back and expecting any glue to hold when the case is screwed up.
I scrape the surrounding plastic and the pillar to roughen it, glue the pillar in place with superglue, then use a good quality epoxy glue to build up a thick fillet all around the pillar and the case.
I do not use quick set Araldite epoxy it is rubbish and stays soft enough to tear even after days..
Use a high quality slow setting epoxy. There is not much point in mentioning the type I use because it is no longer available. But it was made by SP systems, and comes in 2 tins one a dark grey paste and the other a white paste.

Mike
Do you happen to know if Araldite Standard (which is very slow setting) is OK for what you were doing? I need an adhesive that is capable of filling spaces and that won't run through any gaps or holes before it "sets" - i.e. that will stay where it's put without running everywhere.

Mike
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Old 18th Oct 2020, 9:21 am   #33
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

Probably OT but worth telling I think. A few years ago I stuck a piece of single-sided PCB in the bottom of a diecast aluminium enclosure using bog-standard Bostik. About a year later I wanted to dismantle it, but the PCB was reluctant to come out. I resorted to levering it with a large screwdriver and it took all my strength. Eventually the bottom of the box cracked! I developed a new respect for Bostik after that!
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Old 20th Oct 2020, 7:40 pm   #34
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

Here is a technique I have used with great success. First the pillar and surrounding area is roughened with glass paper. Then the pillar is positioned with superglue (just to hold it for the real repair). Then I coat the area with Devcon 30 minute epoxy and take cloth tape with a fairly coarse weave and soak it with the same epoxy and place around the area to be repaired. The epoxy soaked cloth tape becomes immensely strong when set. You can see an example in the attached photo (for those wondering it is in fact an R/C transmitter). You need to vary the technique to suit the nature and position of the break. In this case I was able to take advantage of the close proximity of the pillar to the case sides.
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Old 21st Oct 2020, 7:35 pm   #35
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Default Re: Glue for plastic

This is a very good technique! It's the same principle as building something out of fibreglass, micarta, duroplast, hemp etc.

But using it on case plastics, that's something I'd never think of, but when I see someone else do it, suddenly it's like it was staring me in the face this whole time.
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