UK Vintage Radio Repair and Restoration Powered By Google Custom Search Vintage Radio and TV Service Data

Go Back   UK Vintage Radio Repair and Restoration Discussion Forum > Specific Vintage Equipment > Vintage Tape (Audio), Cassette, Wire and Magnetic Disc Recorders and Players

Notices

Vintage Tape (Audio), Cassette, Wire and Magnetic Disc Recorders and Players Open-reel tape recorders, cassette recorders, 8-track players etc.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 16th Sep 2021, 3:44 am   #1
DennisCA
Diode
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: Vaasa, Finland.
Posts: 6
Default Very slack belt inside radio cassette player

I got this JVC 9401LF Radio with a cassette player and the cassette unit does not work. One issue is the belt, it is so slack that it fell off the pulleys.

Can a belt get that slack with age? And does anyone know of a replacement belt and what size it ought to be?

Last edited by Cobaltblue; 16th Sep 2021 at 7:38 am. Reason: Broken link removed
DennisCA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Sep 2021, 8:10 am   #2
emeritus
Dekatron
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Brentwood, Essex, UK.
Posts: 4,470
Default Re: Very slack belt inside radio cassette player

It sometimes happens with old machines. I have had it with an early Sony shoebox cassette recorder and a Motorola 8 track car radio. At least going slack is better than turning to sticky goo that is very difficult to get rid of.

Last edited by emeritus; 16th Sep 2021 at 8:15 am. Reason: Typos
emeritus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Sep 2021, 9:10 am   #3
DMcMahon
Dekatron
 
DMcMahon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Worthing, West Sussex, UK.
Posts: 4,057
Default Re: Very slack belt inside radio cassette player

Yes belts can stretch a lot due to age/usage, especially the thinner belts that are used in cassette recorders.

It will be almost impossible to find out the original size as manufacturers very seldom listed that information. A data sheet for this model is available as a purchasable download from the Instant Downloads from top right corner of screen, but it will not give any drive belt dimensions.

Using a piece of fine string or cotton you can position it around the belt path until it is a snug fit and then measure its overall length (circumference) then calculate its diameter, belts are normally sold by their ID (Internal Diameter) then from one of the many online sellers find a belt of correct ID and thickness.

It maybe just easier to purchase a set of cassette belts from an online seller such as eBay, search for cassette belt and you will see there are loads of assorted sized belt sets for sale. The actual size is not overly important, as long as not too slack or too tight.

David
DMcMahon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Sep 2021, 10:18 am   #4
Ekcoman
Heptode
 
Ekcoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Southend, Essex, UK
Posts: 615
Default Re: Very slack belt inside radio cassette player

You can buy assorted size belts in a single pack on eBay. Make sure you get the right type as you'll find both square and flat.
__________________
"I really am seriously downsizing "

Last edited by paulsherwin; 16th Sep 2021 at 10:21 am. Reason: Don't use euphemisms for eBay
Ekcoman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th Sep 2021, 12:36 pm   #5
DennisCA
Diode
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: Vaasa, Finland.
Posts: 6
Default Re: Very slack belt inside radio cassette player

I ordered one of those kits with a large selection of belts. I did manage to get it working with a rubber string on an experimental basis, but the sound quality is atrocious. Mostly just noise. I can play the same cassette on my deck however and it sounds perfectly fine.

I cleaned the read heads with a q-tip and isopropyl alcohol but it made no difference. The radio unit self sounds perfectly fine so the speaker works.

There are a lot of electrolytic capacitors in this... I am leaning towards one or several is malfunctioning. Or the heads are really worn out, or maybe some alignment issue?
DennisCA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th Sep 2021, 3:42 pm   #6
60 oldjohn
Dekatron
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: East Yorkshire, UK.
Posts: 3,029
Default Re: Very slack belt inside radio cassette player

Quote:
Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
I did manage to get it working with a rubber string on an experimental basis, but the sound quality is atrocious. Mostly just noise.
Have you cleaned the PLAY / RECORD and possibly the TAPE / RADIO change over switches?


John.
__________________
My favourite text message "I'll be there in five minutes, if not read again"
60 oldjohn is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 20th Sep 2021, 4:45 pm   #7
emeritus
Dekatron
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Brentwood, Essex, UK.
Posts: 4,470
Default Re: Very slack belt inside radio cassette player

My original E3302 used to get a lot of use and got through several heads in the years it was in regular use (from memory, the specified head life was only 500 hours). Worn heads just used to result in loss of treble
emeritus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st Sep 2021, 6:52 am   #8
DennisCA
Diode
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: Vaasa, Finland.
Posts: 6
Default Re: Very slack belt inside radio cassette player

Quote:
Originally Posted by 60 oldjohn View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
I did manage to get it working with a rubber string on an experimental basis, but the sound quality is atrocious. Mostly just noise.
Have you cleaner the PLAY / RECORD and possibly the TAPE / RADIO change over switches?

John.
No I have not tried that, there's a switch on the side that does that, but it does seem to work, the radio turns off when I switch to cassette mode.
DennisCA is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools



All times are GMT. The time now is 10:02 am.


All information and advice on this forum is subject to the WARNING AND DISCLAIMER located at https://www.vintage-radio.net/rules.html.
Failure to heed this warning may result in death or serious injury to yourself and/or others.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2002 - 2021, Paul Stenning.