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Vintage Television and Video Vintage television and video equipment, programmes, VCRs etc.

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Old 6th Feb 2020, 10:00 am   #21
Brigham
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

It's 'classic' rather than 'vintage' with motor cars and the like. It seems to mean 'out of production', which is why I stopped visiting 'classic' car shows.
The Veteran Car Club originally catered for cars up to 1904, which is the date still for Brighton Run entries.
'Veteran' might be a good word for television sets which span the period from there being NO television, to the point where they became a regular item of commerce.
The end-date would need to be decided by common agreement, but I would hazard a guess that ITA would definitely be OUT.
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Old 6th Feb 2020, 11:15 am   #22
Welsh Anorak
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

I think Vintage covers what you don't remember being current, if truth were told! How many times have you heard, say, a Thorn 1500 described as vintage and indignantly cried 'I remember having one of them!'. But of course they are now 50 years old. The terma classic, vintage and, heaven help us, 'mid-century' are over-used. I think on here we know what we're talking about, and don't need to get caught up in semantics like seems to happen in the classic car world.
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Old 6th Feb 2020, 11:39 am   #23
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

Quote:
Originally Posted by llama View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by slidertogrid View Post

Some sets definitely go for props. A buyer for the Netflix series The Crown bought a fair few sets from me a while back. I also know they also bought a few on ebay. This the buyer told me was cheaper than hiring props.
That's rather disturbing if the sets just get dumped at the end of the shoot.
Graham
Yes that was a concern of mine . The props buyer said she had been all over the country buying furniture and the like. I asked what happened to it all at the end of the shoot. She replied that some props were kept for future productions, larger furniture and things that were not required anymore were sent to auction.
I sold them sets that I had as duplicates or had been robbed to get others going. One set had been a donor for three others and had a broken tuner, open circuit CRT heaters, a duff LOPT and crumbling scancoils...
Not the sort of thing it would have been fair to sell to a collector!

It is always a risk when disposing of collectable stuff that it will end up being 'repurposed' painted. stripped or robbed but what can you do? Top gear has trashed many a classic car just for fun...
I sold a pre war radio some time back. It had a nice cabinet and was restorable, when the chap collected it he told me he had two others and wanted it for spares....
I have three classic cars (two I have owned over 30 years) various clocks loads of radios and probably approaching 50 TV sets I do worry what will happen to it all when I pop my clogs. I have to resign myself to the fact that it's only "stuff"...
Rich
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Old 6th Feb 2020, 11:41 am   #24
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

I imagine we all have our period in time which we view as our own 'golden age', dictated most probably by our ages. My interest is in late '50's, dual standards, valve hybrids through to colour in the '80's. This is entirely because that's what I remember and used to play with when I was younger.

I have watched with amazement the rising prices on Ebay and have wondered the same thing- who is buying them and why?

I think people such as us on these forums who wish to restore/ repair and periodically use these old sets account for a very tiny percentage of Ebay sales. Most of us probably wouldn't dream of paying several hundred pounds for a set.

There is a whole 'retro' thing going on at the moment driven by younger people. Anything that looks old is seen as 'cool', so to have a '60's TV in the corner is just the thing. There is no intention or desire to repair it or have it working. In essence it is just a 'prop'.

In fact, restored, working sets fall into a rather difficult market. The 'retro' folk don't need them working and the restorers don't want a set that has been restored. All the fun is in doing the restoration, not in owning the finished set!

It's interesting to see the sets that get re-listed time and time again with wildly optimistic prices.

I think that many sets are bought because people think it's a rising market and they can make money by reselling them. Speculation in other words.

Just my take on it all,
All the best
Nick
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Old 6th Feb 2020, 6:59 pm   #25
Welsh Anorak
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

Absolutely. You'll see those 'Buy it Now' prices which are just wild speculation. It costs nothing to list, and if it sells then great. Of course it doesn't help us. How often do we hear 'I've seen one for sale for £150 and I'm only asking £100'? Offering a realistic ten or twenty pounds doesn't exactly go down well, so we end up being the bad guys!
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Old 6th Feb 2020, 7:18 pm   #26
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

I imagine those who want televisions for retro gaming will be after high end video monitors such as the Sony PVM and BVM series. Failing that, any decent TV with RGB SCART from the 1990s - 2000s will do. Most of these televisions will probably be hard to give away. I was given a nice 1994 24" Panasonic last year!

I can't see people buying RF only televisions for playing old games. I think that most of the computers/games consoles that were RF or composite only can be modded to output a better quality video signal; usually composite or RGB. I know that HDMI out mods have been developed for the NES and Nintendo 64.

The prices of retro systems have certainly shot up during the past 10 - 15 years.
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Old 6th Feb 2020, 7:21 pm   #27
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Welsh Anorak View Post
Absolutely. You'll see those 'Buy it Now' prices which are just wild speculation. It costs nothing to list, and if it sells then great. Of course it doesn't help us. How often do we hear 'I've seen one for sale for £150 and I'm only asking £100'? Offering a realistic ten or twenty pounds doesn't exactly go down well, so we end up being the bad guys!
Always check out the previous 'sold' prices for items as 'Buy it Now' (asking) prices very often don't mean a lot, they're often speculative prices in the hope that someone is daft enough or hungry enough to pay it. And don't ever consider yourself a bad guy for making a realistic offer for something, it's a valuable reality check to the seller. If enough people make realistic offers, then there's a chance that it may sway them to sell at a realistic price.
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Old 6th Feb 2020, 7:36 pm   #28
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

My main interest is 405 line sets, and quite a few were obtained via ebay, but recently I have noticed that there are fewer sets available, and the ones that do turn up go for silly money!

Quote:
Maybe itís time I moved them on whilst they are popular!
I must admit to thinking the same thing, I have a few dual standard sets that are not really my thing, buy it now for £300 each anyone?

Mark
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Old 6th Feb 2020, 8:18 pm   #29
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

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Originally Posted by donutty View Post
As the title says - but more specifically on eBay.

Anything with woodgrain (real or simulated) or valves seems to be selling very well.

I've seen run-of-the-mill 1980s plastic faux-wood lumps sell for £100+ and very tatty valve based sets for not inconsiderable sums.

Are these really appreciating in value that much? Are people hoarding them? Is there a sudden need for these sets as 'props'?

I have also seen people *trying* to get £300+ for a Ferguson Courier and others trying for £100+ for similar B&W portable sets.

This astounded me somewhat as I am trying to get a reasonably priced (hybrid would be fine) portable set for my kitchen so keep a watch on what is floating about. I just don't get it, as often they are not restored and would be quite a challenge to 'average joe' unless they had the right skills.


Your thoughts please...
Yes certain TV sets are now fetching high prices. On Ebay recently there was a Baird Model from late 60s (colour) which went for over a £1000.

I am a fan of the continental sets from the 1970s, the likes of Telefunken, SABA and Nordmende. I also have a B&O 3400 and Philips K12 Chassis sets plus a couple of Sony sets.
All these were well designed both cosmetically and internally.

However I have not been able to find just one of these sets over several years of searching (Bar the B&O and the Sony) anywhere in the UK - They seem to have completely disappeared!!
So I had to resort to searching in Germany which was far more fruitful.
Prices there are fairly cheap, the main cost is getting them here and the difficulty arranging collection with language barriers etc.
I have done this and have a fair collection, but it takes a lot of effort to arrange.
Also choice of courier is important. In the early days I used DHL but 2 portables were smashed on arrival (CRTS OK though) and one guy actually sent me a 26" Telefunken by this method (a huge box), that did arrive undamaged externally, but it no longer worked. (not looked at that yet). so it had a rough ride.
So I now use a private courier who takes care of these things and usually arrive safely. It would be easier if there were sets here in the UK though!
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Old 6th Feb 2020, 8:23 pm   #30
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

I've been looking on ebay for just over a year or so now, and in that relatively short time, the prices have risen quite a bit, even for your average monochrome 12" portable - no one seems to really want those. Colour portables seem to sell, but after a little while of being for sale.

It does definitely seem that it's woodgrain sets that are desired at the moment. There's usually a 1980s-90s Bang and Olufsen set for sale, with wood grain, and I don't think I've seen any of these not sell, but those without woodgrain seem to struggle, I managed to get a complete, working 3802 for just £10 because no one wanted it, whereas similar chassis and era sets can go for so much more.

There's definitely more 1970s colour sets for sale now, than there has been previously. Monochrome sets seem harder to find now. People are probably realising the "values" of these sets, and digging them out from the backs of lofts, sheds and garages and trying to sell them, in hopes of making a fair bit of money. All it takes is one seller to post one with an optimistic price, then others follow, and soon they're all asking for way more than it's worth. People are most likely thinking they're more valuable, digging them out from the backs of lofts, sheds and garages, and trying to sell them in hopes of making a dair bit of money from them. The most expensive I've seen sets sell for are in the £800-£1000 mark for 1960s Baird colour sets.

There must be three markets for CRT sets, retro gamers are more in it for performance and inputs rather than design, the retro enthusiasts/trend followers are more for the looks of the set (and probably don't plan on using them) and then there's us restorers and collectors.

There's also that trend of gutting them and making them into fish tanks and drinks cabinets.

'77
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Old 6th Feb 2020, 9:22 pm   #31
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

The very last of the 405 line only sets are very desirable. Best of all is the 1962 Philips 19TG112. Also look out for the Decca DR29C, has a hand wired chassis.
Converted dual standard models can be fun and one of the best is the Murphy Astra with the plinth converter. Superb sets.
Converted Philips Twin-line sets are amazing. Separate 405 and 625 IF amplifiers plus other bits added to optimise performance on 625. All this complication yet very reliable in service.

DFWB.
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Old 6th Feb 2020, 10:29 pm   #32
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Hello folks,

yes it can be great fun watching "classic" TV. I have got about a dozen sets dating from 1953 Eastern Germany's "Stassfurt" to most reliable b/w SABA 187, among some 1967 - 1972 early colour sets Siemens Bildmeister FE 11, Blaupunkt 55 cm or most solid SABA 2705 and 3600 sets - weighing 100 lbs! The latter I've fixed as a young lad and I have always been fond of the nicely made wiring looms in hoses and the supersonic remote operating motor-driven potentiometers and motor-driven station switches.
Maybe I am going to sell some 80s and 90s transistorized sets some day taking too much space in the basement.

My son recently showed to me John F Kennedy on a 1956 Blaupunkt "Palermo". This was impressive!

Regards, Joe
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Old 9th Feb 2020, 8:36 am   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1100 man View Post
I imagine we all have our period in time which we view as our own 'golden age', dictated most probably by our ages. My interest is in late '50's, dual standards, valve hybrids through to colour in the '80's. This is entirely because that's what I remember and used to play with when I was younger.

I have watched with amazement the rising prices on Ebay and have wondered the same thing- who is buying them and why?

I think people such as us on these forums who wish to restore/ repair and periodically use these old sets account for a very tiny percentage of Ebay sales. Most of us probably wouldn't dream of paying several hundred pounds for a set.

There is a whole 'retro' thing going on at the moment driven by younger people. Anything that looks old is seen as 'cool', so to have a '60's TV in the corner is just the thing. There is no intention or desire to repair it or have it working. In essence it is just a 'prop'.

In fact, restored, working sets fall into a rather difficult market. The 'retro' folk don't need them working and the restorers don't want a set that has been restored. All the fun is in doing the restoration, not in owning the finished set!

It's interesting to see the sets that get re-listed time and time again with wildly optimistic prices.

I think that many sets are bought because people think it's a rising market and they can make money by reselling them. Speculation in other words.

Just my take on it all,
All the best
Nick
I agree entirely. The classic car market saw prices inflated by speculators who saw these vehicles as a hedge against inflation. Indeed, I have rejected an offer of £8k for my 1939 Wolseley 12/48 that I paid £2.5k for in 2006. Now, we seem to be witnessing a very similar scenario with TVs. Ten years ago, the only TVs that were routinely changing hands for silly prices, e.g. £300 were Bush TV22s, etc. in good cosmetic condition. Personally, I think that no genuine restorer would pay such outrageous prices as those seen on Ebay unless he had more money than sense!

I would need to have more front than Selfridges to try and get £100+ for a 1970s/80s monochrome portable!
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Old 9th Feb 2020, 10:53 am   #34
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

On eBay was listed a Bush TV 24A. After several bids and several days mine was winning at £24. I then get an e mail saying all bids had been cancelled by the seller due to listing error. I now have received an e mail saying everyone deserves a second chance from eBay.
The seller now wants £179 plus postage for the non-working set with a damaged Bush badge. I will not be buying this set!

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Old 9th Feb 2020, 11:09 am   #35
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You are best off not bothering with eBay for vintage tellies these days, I find the NVCF is the best place to get them! More choice and sensible prices. One of the best sets I got was a 1950’s Ferguson, can’t remember the model, but it was £22 from an antiques centre! Everyone says antiques centres are always overpriced, but I’ve found a few up here in Lincolnshire that are not. And that set wasn’t a shabby one either, the cabinet was in nice condition, but did have a little bit of woodworm, which I treated and so far they haven’t come back, I did empty a whole can of worm killer into it though!

The last vintage telly I bought via eBay was a Perdio Portarama, Which was £25 inc p&p (£8 was what the set sold for!) and that was back in 2016, I don’t think the crazy prices had really taken off back then, but every other Portarama since has always had a high starting price, I think I just got lucky with that one, even though it’s missing all it’s knobs and aerial.

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Old 9th Feb 2020, 12:57 pm   #36
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Thank you all for your contributions (but please keep the thread going!). It pretty much confirms my suspicions that in many cases people are realising that the old tellies are getting scarce and see them as something akin to classic cars or 'the next vinyl revival' and are speculating and accumulating.

Quite by coincidence and in line with the Selfridges reference, attached is a photo I snapped yesterday of the display window of a Sheffield menswear store. One of the other 'prop' uses for old TV and tech in general. Oh yeah - nice metal display stand feet scratching up the top bakelite !!

In an antique shop a couple of weeks ago I inquired over a vintage TV they had, and he would not budge on price (not even a fiver) and says he can sell them at that price all day long to shopfitters and the like who dress up the trendy new gastropubs with vintage decor (same also happens to nice old Singer sewing machines).

Also, have you noticed that (side effect of the internet for a good couple of decades now) many eBay sellers are now looking a lot more clued up about old TVs - "This one has the G8 chassis so I am lead to believe" so are trying to, as far as I can see it, appeal directly to the restorers / collectors market.
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Old 9th Feb 2020, 1:13 pm   #37
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

Quote:
The last vintage telly I bought via eBay was a Perdio Portarama, Which was £25 inc p&p (£8 was what the set sold for!) and that was back in 2016
I also got a Perdio Portarama on ebay for not much more, apart from being a bit grubby it is in excellent condition, even down to the front pushbuttons and aerial. The only missing items are the power leads.

The last set I got was a rough TV24, I was amazed that I got it for only £8 plus £20 in petrol to fetch it!

There have been some bargains in recent months, but as always, the other end of the country
I did manage to get a huge Grundig 5077 radio for £2.20 back in November, so there is still the odd gem to be had.

I do have enough projects to last me many years though, so not too worried!
I expect prices will fall again, just like they have with the Dansette prices.

Mark
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Old 9th Feb 2020, 9:10 pm   #38
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I am not sure about prices to fall once again. Over here some nice small size sets Philips "Philetta" have become very popular over the years, regardless of the fact that some versions were not "top class" manufacture and ingredients (U-valves and cheap capacitors). Selling at prices that can make you head shaking!

Well, every deal should leave both seller and buyer satisfied, so if someone pays £20 for a 50 year old tellie and collects the huge item himself this is ok in my eyes. Yes I would not let let go a Stassfurt Patriot 16GW437 for that sum, but I have seen one on ebay starting Ä300 - that is too much for an apparatus where you must expect that almost every passive component is to be replaced due ageing.

Regards, Joe
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Old 9th Feb 2020, 10:00 pm   #39
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

Things change. When I got my ZX81 computer back in 1981 my parents allowed me to have an old 26" Bush valve B&W TV in my bedroom so I wouldn't hog the one TV we had. I guess it would have been 15 years or so old at the time? In 1981 it was just considered obsolete and sold for £5 at a charity shop. Today if the set is still around it would be considered a lovely vintage valve CRT television. To the best of my knowledge my parents got rid of it in the late late 90s because by that time it was considered worthless.

Though I do also see many eBay sellers offering goods at "buy it now" for ridiculous prices there's no doubt that a working set even from the 80s is considered vintage tech now.
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 1:58 pm   #40
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Default Re: Who is buying vintage TVs?

Recently I’ve acquired a few sets off my wanted list all at a very reasonable price in fact some of the didn’t cost a penny
Some of the sets recently acquired are THORN 2000 d/s colour , Philips G6 d/s colour , GEC 2112 s/s colour pye K30 , murphy acoustic deluxe mono , and a Ferguson golden glide
All of the above are nice sets and cost less than £400 for the lot so not everything is over priced
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