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Old 5th Aug 2019, 2:28 pm   #1
David G4EBT
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Default Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

I know that PCB making is something of a minority interest on the forum, and those who are involved will use a range of methods, whether toner transfer or UV. For those such as myself who use the UV process, the first hurdle is to create either a positive or negative acetate mask which will be perfectly opaque where required.

Modern home printers of whatever make and model, whether laser or ink jet, seem to make a very poor job when using normal OHP type film, even when two or three copies are taped over each other to try to improve the density. A downside of that is that the areas of the mask that need to be transparent also become less so when copies are placed one over another.

I've never found other methods of creating a mask very satisfactory, such as printing on tracing paper (known outside the UK as 'vegetal' paper). I know that it's said that spraying the paper with WD40 helps to make it more transparent, but it's never worked for me, neither has 'transparentiser' spray.

The only acetate film that I've come across which makes excellent masks is known as 'micro-porous film' which is coated in a way that absorbs ink, and the only UK source I've found for it is Homecrafts:

https://www.homecrafts.co.uk/catalog...o+Porous+Paper

(They also supply ink-jet and laser water-slide transfer paper, but that can be found elsewhere, from 'Mr Decal Paper' for example).

I've just had notification that Homecrafts is shortly to close down, so I've ordered a couple of packs of film to keep me going. Anyone else on the forum who uses the film might wish to do likewise.

Rambling off the topic of PCB acetates, how sad to see the impending demise of Homecrafts, given it's origins. Although only branded as Homecrafts in 1994, the company goes back to 1907 when Harry Peach founded Dryad Handicrafts. The same family who were part of Dryad are involved with Homecrafts today.

Not sure why he chose 'Dryad' for his company name - a Dryad is a tree nymph or tree spirit in Greek mythology. Drys signifies "oak" in Greek, and dryads are specifically the nymphs of oak trees, but the term has come to be used for all tree nymphs in general, or all human-tree hybrids in fantasy.

Those of us who are long enough in the tooth will remember Dryad Handicrafts as a household name in the 40s and 50s, supplying all sorts of craft materials for the home and schools, such as lampshade materials, raffia and cane for basket weaving, along with instructional ‘how to do it’ leaflets and booklets on a wide range of crafts.

Initially Harry Peach founded a furniture company, ‘Dryad Works’. During the First World War, they provided a Leicester hospital with off-cuts of cane for basket-making by wounded soldiers. There was a growing demand for cane and other craft materials for use in occupational therapy and in schools. Hence, Harry Peach set up Dryad Handicrafts as an offshoot of his business, to supply this demand.

He was very active during the inter-war period when there was a huge revival of crafts with its roots in the Arts and Crafts movement. He believed in quality and education, and that if children were taught how to craft and design, they would grow up to demand quality goods. How different today - schools have dismantled well-equipped metalwork and woodwork workshops and other crafts such as pottery. All that seems to matter nowadays is 'coding and gaming' - not how to make or mend things.

Homecraft have supplied materials for cardmakers, weavers, painters, felters, printmakers, woodwork and metalworkers, sculptors, knitters, artists and a host of other crafts. I guess that there are other firms and internet suppliers to meet those diminishing needs.

Harry Peach and his cohort had quite an influence with the Arts & Crafts movement in Leicester:

https://gimson.leicester.gov.uk/leic...ach-and-dryad/

Waffling and dribbling again - sorry!
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 4:21 pm   #2
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

Thanks for this. I don't need any of your stuff, but I see that they do stock "Studio Gum" (the replacement for Cow Gum) rubber solution, and have ordered a couple of tins, as well as some replacement sponges for my Antex soldering iron. My last tube of genuine Cow Gum is almost exhausted.
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 5:07 pm   #3
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

Thanks for reading my post - glad the link proved useful.
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 5:54 pm   #4
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

In view of the problems in getting 60/40 solder noted in another thread, I note that they have stocks of it that will probably be only too ready to dispose of! Also proper "Antex" soldering irons.
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 6:53 pm   #5
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

A quick browse of their catalogue will show just home broad the range of crafting materials is. Every type of paper and card, screen printing materials, inks, paints, hat making materials. Admittedly a lot of their lines aren't relevant to us, but I think they'll be missed by many and I don't think the likes of Hobbycraft or The Range quite fit the bill.

I notice that micro-porous film is available at £1.00 a sheet from several internet suppliers, one of who seems to be Crafty Computer Paper, which - like Homecrafts was based in Leicester and as I recall ceased trading some years ago, so it's a bit odd to see the offerings on eBay. (Maybe it's old stock acquired from Crafty Computer Paper?). According to the accounts at Companies House, up to August 2018, Crafty Computer Paper is a dormant company with share capital of £100. It's last trading accounts were for August 2011, which showed a loss of £100,507.

https://www.companiesintheuk.co.uk/f...08-31/69977824

It was an excellent firm - I often bought clear and white waterslide 'decal' paper from them.

They did some useful little 'how to' videos on youtube, such as this one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MvWjEcSKnwY

(My 20 sheets of micro-porous film from Homecrafts cost me £16.00 inc P&P, so cheaper than eBay).
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Old 5th Aug 2019, 10:07 pm   #6
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

David ,as I mentioned sometime in past on PCB posts ( for which I am grateful for your input in bringing my methods up to date ), HOBBYCRAFT sell packs of ( from memory ) 5 sheets of film for use in inkjet printers . It (AFAIK) idntical to that you mentioned in that it accepts inkjet on one side . Price- long time since I bought any ,but (again from memory) less than £5 .
ETA -PRICE IS £3 per pack of 5.
https://www.hobbycraft.co.uk/stix-2-...ntable+acetate
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Old 6th Aug 2019, 10:00 am   #7
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

Thanks for reading the thread and for the link O.C.

The description of those sheets seems to be primarily for crafting - using marker pens, making windows for models etc. Though it does say they're 'printable' there's no mention of them being coated or specifically for use in ink jet printers or for OHP purposes. I'll certainly check them out when I'm in Hobbycrafts. I think that with all acetate sheets, much depends on the make and model of printer.

I used to use these coated OHP acetates, which are now 50 sheets for £12.06 (were £15.03 in 2012!):

https://www.amazon.co.uk/INKJET-CLEA.../dp/B000KJO7BO

They were excellent when I had an HP Photosmart printer, but when that died on me and I bought an Epson the results were very poor whatever setting I used for printing. I've tried all of the settings in my printer software, but none of them produce acceptable results with those sheets. I wrote a review on 29 March 2012 entitled 'Excellent sheets - blame Epson, not the acetates!'

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/customer...SIN=B000KJO7BO

On 10 October 2012 another user with an Epson ink jet wrote a review entitled 'Epson experiments paid off':

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/customer...SIN=B000KJO7BO

The ten most critical ( 1star) reviews of those acetates are for 2019, which suggest that the sheets differ from the originals and are inferior.

In trawling internet, I've come across these, which sound promising.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Inkjet-Acet...5QCETSWZFX7GST

Of the reviews, 86% are 5 star, 14% are four star, and no critical reviews:

25 x A4 OHP Inkjet Acetate Film Sheets 135 Micron, Instant Dry.

Reasonably priced at £9.49 for 25 = 38p each.

For now, I'm well stocked up with the micro-porous film sold by Homecrafts.
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Old 6th Aug 2019, 10:12 am   #8
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

Although I haven’t used it yet I bought some Transcopy acetate sheets that are suitable for laser printers from Seawhite of Brighton, although they are not actually in Brighton. I saw the samples on show which were really dense black.
I was with wife when she was buying artist materials.
No connection, just a customer.
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Old 6th Aug 2019, 11:06 am   #9
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

Before we got a scanner st work, I used to have to copy drawings on transparent sheets to make mirror-image versions. On one occasion some transparencies intended for ink jet printing got mixed up with the laser sheets, and when I used one it melted, wrapping itself around the photocopier's fuser drum. We had to get the service engineer out to fit a replacement.
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Old 7th Aug 2019, 8:59 am   #10
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

Have you considered or tried drafting film? I've had excellent results using it with technical pens and print shops, then transferring the drawings to dyeline prints. As that process depends on transparency, and drafting film retains a good thick black line, perhaps it will also be good for PCB manufacture?

I enjoyed your account of Mr Peach which was very informative and rather fascinating. I can't say I'd heard of the company in any of its iterations, and am now sorry that I hadn't as it appears a good source is going west. I avoid buying from Amazon because of their corporate practices, so am always glad to find alternatives to their ubiquity. In this case, it looks like I'll have to scour the Homecrafts catalogue before it disappears!
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Old 27th Aug 2019, 4:50 pm   #11
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

RE #7. David- I've tried one of these sheets( Hobbycraft) as an experiment in my Epson 2010 ( which runs on non OEM ink). I suspect my first attempt led to an underexposed print, but I had to develop for a long time to remove the resist to find a decent sharp track layout.
I've also found that Hobbycraft do a decent range of hand tools ( cutters diagonal/ long nosed pliers and roll nosed pliers) . For ye olds PO/GPO blokes in here the long nosed are similar to the mini 41's , measuring 5"( half sized 81's with a cutting edge) , and at a reasonable price (less than £10).
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Old 27th Aug 2019, 7:26 pm   #12
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldcodger View Post
RE #7. David - I've tried one of these sheets ( Hobbycraft) as an experiment in my Epson 2010 ( which runs on non OEM ink). I suspect my first attempt led to an underexposed print, but I had to develop for a long time to remove the resist to find a decent sharp track layout.
When you say 'underexposed print' do you mean that the acetate mask turned out OK, but that when you placed the acetate mask on the UV sensitised laminate you didn't allow sufficient exposure time, so the developer wouldn't then wash away the (under)exposed areas of the PCB?

For some time now I've been using negative UV 'dry film' - not sure if that's what you're using. It requires only the clear track and pad layout to be exposed to UV. Any opaque area of the design which is not exposed is washed away by the developer. I've found that if the mask isn't completely opaque, if the exposure time is too long, UV gets through what should be opaque areas of the mask and exposes those areas, which won't then wash off with the developer.

A solid opaque mask is the key to it all. Like most I guess, on occasions I've applied two acetates on top of each other to darken the image, but that can backfire, as not only do the black areas become more opaque, so do what are supposed to be the transparent (track and pad) areas.

Generally, I've found that if I can print a good mask, when using negative dry film in a 2 x 8 Watt light box, about 45 seconds is the optimum exposure time - far less than with pre-sensitised positive resist laminate. If I get the exposure time wrong and the board doesn't develop as desired, I just clean off the UV film with acetone and apply another piece of dry film. It can be bothersome, but it's no big deal. and the UK dry film only costs pennies.

The fist pic below shows a negative mask of a PCB.
Second pic is the PCB after it's been developed, (with soda ash) but prior to etching.
Third pic is etched, with the dry film UV resist still in place.
Fourth pic is the PCB with the resist removed with acetone and the holes drilled.

I still enjoy making my own PCBs but it's easy to see why most people think that making their own PCBs are a bit of a faff and not worth the effort. I take the same view about growing one's own vegetables, but I have a friend who spends every waking hour at his allotment, then gives away most of what he (over)produces. Another chum's definition of a wonderful day is to sit under a large brolly in the rain for hour after hour on a riverbank fishing, to maybe catch a couple of fish then throw them back so he and other can catch them again. (Apparently fishing is second only to gardening as the most popular pastimes).

Funny old world eh - maybe I should see a doctor!?
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Old 27th Aug 2019, 11:35 pm   #13
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

I love these PCB threads. It is indeed fun making them. And yours are right up there with the best.

However I've been really lazy recently. I've got the whole UV set up (I advertised it on here for sale but no one wanted it) but it's been JLCpcb all the way. In fact I just ordered one a minute ago from my hotel room for an OCXO replacement board for a Racal 9915 counter I've been working on

One interesting diversion. I did find a Drew Diamond book at a radio rally and there was an approach for one off boards which involved using packing tape (3M brown parcel tape). You scrub the board clean, dry it, stick brown tape on it, rub it flat, draw the design out with a sharpie (or transfer with carbon paper from a printed design), then cut round it with a scalpel and peel off the bits you want to etch off.

Sceptical at first, I tried it on a one off board. I was proven wrong. Despite my etching tank being a kitchen sink full of hot water with a jam jar with a bit of FeCl in it and some jiggling by hand, the etch was actually excellent and incredibly clean, only let down by my freehand drawing.

Great for the occasional one off if you don't need too much definition. I imagine you could do something with a laser cutter table in this space as well cheaply. A DVD drive laser will quite happily zap a hole through the tape (I tried with one I was playing with a few years ago).

Need to work out a cheap way of tinning now. I'm too much of a cheap old git to buy some tinning crystals!
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Old 28th Aug 2019, 8:51 am   #14
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

Thanks for the heads up David. I ordered some last night.

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Old 30th Aug 2019, 2:35 pm   #15
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

David on undeveloped ,yes ,using negative resist . It took ages for the resist to dissolve. On the plus side this was using Hobbycraft acetate and the image left was clear with sharp edges.
In my earlier years I used to draw my circuits free hand using either a Dalo or Permanant marker pen. I've tried transfers but left a bit of sweat on the boards and it didn't help etching
I ( as I've mentioned ) use Express PCB ( with my own custom PCB symbols as I feel that the standard ones are ok for firms with expensive kit, but a bit small for us home brew merchants. I've found an easier way of making a negative mask- I use the default colours to design the PCB, then go into options and invert the colours . Problem then is that Express is only designed for a positive mask, so I set the board outer colour to black and copy into a photo program. I use an old MS2000 PHOTODRAW to paste the mask onto the size of film I'll be using ( using the custom paper option) and then the resize option to get the overall board size right. Print onto a bit of plain paper to check some component sizes as a secondary check on the board dimensions and then print the acetate.
All I've go to do now is get the exposure time and develop time right and I'll be there.
I've found that laying down a .1x.1 inch matrix ( as in a bit of vero) with .08 tracks helps me to position components.
Mr B - on the topic of using carbon paper - years ago ( more like two score ) I made the xylophone as in the 70's Practical ?? . The component layout I did freehand, but I used the PCB layout in the mag. Photocopied I stuck this over the board with carbon paper between and used a pencil to mark out the keys.
Swimbo coated this with a coat of clear nail polish and I removed the gaps between keys with a nail. Made a far btter PCB finish than the tracks I'd done with the DALO pen.
Later Swimbo told me she'd seen nail polish pens advertised, but we never found any. She suggested it would be perfect for PCB work.
However I've noticed nail art pens on Amazon at a reasonable price. gel coat- so perhaps we might need Swimbo advice on using these
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Old 30th Aug 2019, 3:17 pm   #16
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

Interesting stuff. I am asking my other half about the nail pens now

Did a board using the tape and scalpel method over the last couple of days. I started in Kicad and taped the drill chart to the board then drilled it, then taped it and etched it. Came out pretty good.

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(OCXO replacement for Racal counter)

David: I've got to be honest there. The only reason I enjoy making PCBs is after reading your enthusiasm for the subject. It's infectious
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Old 30th Aug 2019, 9:15 pm   #17
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Default Re: Micro-Porous film for PCB masks - Homecrafts closing down!

Thanks for the compliment Mr B - I've never lost my enthusiasm for homebrew and designing and making simple PCBs. For me, though messy, tedious and time consuming it can be, it isn't a chore or an obstacle or I'd find something else to do!

Well done on your 'parcel tape' PCB - it looks excellent.

For many years I used to use 'Fablon' sticky backed plastic onto which I traced PCBs from magazine layouts using carbon paper, occasionally using modelling paints or rub down transfers for such things are IC pads. Back when Practical Wireless really was 'practical' and was full of constructional articles, PCB layouts pre-date CAD design packages and seemed to favour 'Fablon' style PCB layouts.

My first big project was the PW 'Purbeck' oscilloscope in which the raw and stabilised power supply PCBs were designed so that they could be made using cut out Fablon, as can be seen on pages 26 & 29 of the May 1978 PW. The scope worked a treat and I still have it, though haven't used it for many years:

https://www.americanradiohistory.com...PW-1978-05.pdf

The June 1978 PW featured part 2 of an Audio Distortion meter, for which there were four PCBs, the artwork for which is on pages 22 & 24. Again, the PCB designs lent themselves to the Fablon/parcel tape technique:

https://www.americanradiohistory.com...PW-1978-06.pdf

Back when Radio & Electronics World was in print, it featured a design for a 15 Watt HF PA, which used four CB transceiver PA transistors. The PCB for that design was a 'Fablon inspired' one. I built to use for a homebrew G-QRP 'Epiphyte' 5 Watt SSB transceiver.

For some time now I've tended to design layouts which leave as much copper on the board as possible, by creating blocks which hark back to 'Fablon days' rather than pad and track layouts. I've never bothered with CAD PCB packages, which really, aren't meant for homebrew PCBs. I see lots of designs created with software such as Express PCB, with needlessly narrow tracks and small pads. Fine if the PCB is professionally made and CNC drilled, but for DIY techniques? I don't think so. It takes far longer to etch such layouts, with the risk of 'undercutting' tracks, and calls for very accurate drilling of pads.

I sometimes amend published designs to add more copper.

We each come at this from different angles and so long as we enjoy it, that's all that matters. I dislike stripboard, Manhattan and 'dead bug' construction - I know the electrons don't care one way or the other, but if I can't make things neatly, I don't bother. Of course, nowadays, the laser print/iron on technique, which I've never tried, obviates the need for a UV light box, a UV mask and getting the exposure time and developer strength just right.

A few pics below of PCBs that have lent themselves to 'Fablon'/parcel tape:

Pic 1: The 15 Watt HF PA from R&EW.
Pic 2: A regulated PSU PCB
Pic 3: My amended version of that PCB to the same layout , but leaving more copper in place, lessening the etching time.
Pic 4: Etched and drilled PCB I designed for the two transistor Gary Tempest amplified loop antenna.
Pic 5: Etched and drilled PCB I designed for the Gary Tempest 'Wellgood' clone amplified loop antenna.

(The latter two designs featured in BVWS Bulletins, using 'Manhattan' construction).

The PCBs in pics 4, & 5 were made using negative UV dry film, which requires a negative rather than positive UV mask. Using that technique, any transparent areas of the mask remain after etching, and any opaque areas are dissolved when the PCB is developed, and etched away in the etching process. I can see the appeal of parcel tape!

“I suppose you'd have to say that my interest in the subject fell somewhere between the Land of Hobbies and the Kingdom of Obsession.”

― Stephen King, Everything's Eventual: 14 Dark Tales.

Errrm yes, I guess so!
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