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Old 30th Jul 2019, 7:53 am   #1
joebog1
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Default Cataract surgery

Just a quick word to those that correspond with me.
Surgery put off at last minute by public health.
I'm with you for a while yet.
Please forgive my typing skills as the keyboard gets more and more dim each day, AND it's backlit.

Joe
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 1:30 am   #2
joebog1
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

My surgery has taken place ( at last) BUT I must say that anybody who suffers cataract "blindness" ( is that the correct term ?? ) should bite the bullet and have this done.
I have been transformed !! From a blind old goat, to reading 1 mm print at arms length in five days.
There is absolutely no pain!!.
Actual operation takes around 15 minutes.
I walked into the theater "blind", and walked out being blinded by how bright the world really is!!.
Focus was instant!.
I no longer wear ( $600 a time, every year or so ) glasses. NOT for anything!
I can read 1/4 watt resistors ( 5 band) at arms length. ( I do struggle a bit with the "blue painted variety )

To be resurrected: one only Laboratory Goldenear Amplifier.

One further hint: there are two types of modern insert lenses. One is called mono-focal,
the other is multi-focal.
Mono-focal is OK if you just want to drive, or read a newspaper in bright light.
They will still require glasses to work on our precious hobby.
Multi-focal lenses are in fact a tiny Fresnel lens, that has the ability to work at far distance, ( driving on motorways at speed) middle distance, such as reading road signs at 100 mtrs distance, and close up. I no longer need a maggie lamp to even see the resistor, let alone decode the colours. I had to pay ( $355, about 200 quid) extra for the multi-focal. I dont often offer advice, on this occasion I do,
YOU CAN'T TAKE IT WITH YOU !!
Regain your sight!! Spend the money. I cannot believe the change I have seen in just a few days.

Yes I am ranting!! What a wonderful rant.

My best wishes to all

Joe

P.S.
YES Im still an old goat, but now a very happy sharp sighted goat.
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 10:18 am   #3
vidjoman
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

Excellent result. My wife had both eyes done a short while ago and her almost monochrome world was suddenly transformed into a bright vivid colourful place she previously knew.
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 10:26 am   #4
Nuvistor
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

Wonderful story, really pleased for you.
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 10:38 am   #5
paulsherwin
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

Glad it worked out so well for you Joe. I have developing cataracts so will need this procedure done in the next few years, but things aren't too bad yet and I still have 20/20 vision with glasses. Did the hospital do both eyes at the same time? It's very common to do each eye separately in case there are complications.
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 10:45 am   #6
joebog1
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

Yes Paul,
one at a time. BOTH together would probably have me saying mass.
Right eye was blind, Left eye is "still OK "
Real story is !!
I can see!!! REALLY well.
Thanks to all who responded !! THAT in itself makes us a small family.

Joe
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 11:48 am   #7
HamishBoxer
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

Great news very pleased for you.
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 12:49 pm   #8
Reelman
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

I am very happy for you Joe, it will certainly give you a better quality of life. Very pleased for you!

I have a congenital cataract in my left eye and even being under Moorfields Hospital in London since birth, an operation has never been considered. At 63 now I suppose that to be successful it would have had to be done when young, and at the time the op was in it’s infancy and quite involved.
If my right eye fails I would like the operation on my left but I don’t know anyone who has been in the same situation who could advise. For years I have been told medically that it is unlikely for the left eye to be able to function after so long a time.... I’m not so sure.

Peter
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 1:49 pm   #9
Sideband
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

I don't think age is so important now. I know someone who is 60 and her sight has been transformed. Fortunately I'm not having any problems yet and my site (at 66) is still very good with glasses.

Excellent news Joe...you'll be fixing SMD boards without a magnifier!
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 2:09 pm   #10
paulsherwin
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reelman View Post
I have a congenital cataract in my left eye and even being under Moorfields Hospital in London since birth, an operation has never been considered. At 63 now I suppose that to be successful it would have had to be done when young, and at the time the op was in itís infancy and quite involved.
If my right eye fails I would like the operation on my left but I donít know anyone who has been in the same situation who could advise. For years I have been told medically that it is unlikely for the left eye to be able to function after so long a time.... Iím not so sure.
I think the problem is likely to be that you have been effectively blind in the left eye since birth, so the areas of the brain which interact with that eye will have atrophied. The brain has an amazing ability to rewire itself, but in this case it's likely that the the rewiring has been to give you pseudo stereopathy and depth perception using your right eye alone. I'm not a doctor though, and you would need to discuss this with an opthalmic surgeon.
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 2:28 pm   #11
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reelman View Post
I have a congenital cataract in my left eye and even being under Moorfields Hospital in London since birth, an operation has never been considered. At 63 now I suppose that to be successful it would have had to be done when young,

Peter
If there is a defect which prevents the eye from seeing well, or if there is an ocular motor (eye direction misalignment) before the age of about 7 or 8 years old, the turned or de-focused eye has its vision suppressed at the cortical (brain) level and the dominant eye grabs the connections in the visual system.

After the "concrete sets" on this initial plastic process in childhood, after the age of about 8 to 10 years, it is impossible to reverse.

Even though an eye might look good at a microscope and could have its cataract fixed for a clearer image on the retina, or the extra-ocular muscles moved to straighten it, the eyesight will not improve, because the fundamental problem does not now reside in the eye, it is in the brain.

For example you could get an adult, pad one eye closed for 10 years, take off the pad and the vision would be normal. If you did that to a baby, there would be no vision via that eye and it would not be recoverable.

This is why the operation on your eye has not been considered. In theory the doctors should have explained these principles to you.

One problem is that the eye that cannot see well gets blamed, with terms like lazy eye, causing people to believe the problem resides in the eye and therefore if the eye had a procedure it could be fixed. The correct terminology is Amblyopia, which means "blunted vision" and does not put the blame at the eye end of the visual system.

If the issue is found early enough in childhood the better eye can be occluded for times to help strengthen up the connections of the eye with the poorer vision.

Paulsherwin makes a good point. For individuals who have had reduced vision in one eye since childhood, the brain has an amazing ability to process the data from the "good eye" and re-compute it for a form of stereopsis. Many excellent sports players in ball games etc have had impaired vision from childhood via one eye and they have no apparent difficulty with stereo vision or depth judgement. If the vision is lost in one eye as an adult, mostly it takes at least a few months to adapt, and transport authorities suggest no driving for 3 months, but the adaptation would not be nearly as good as from a childhood scenario when the visual system is still plastic.

Last edited by Argus25; 4th Sep 2019 at 2:40 pm.
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 3:19 pm   #12
paulsherwin
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

I developed strabismus (divergent squint) following a measles infection when I was 2. This was corrected surgically when I was 5, but I never regained binocular vision - both eyes work, but not at the same time. I have good depth perception but have always been very bad at catching fast moving objects - a cricketer I'm definitely not. I think this is because my brain is going through convoluted processes to work out where moving objects are, and this is much slower than standard binocular vision. I'm not conscious of anything unusual happening of course. I imagine it's a bit like a processor doing floating point calculations in software rather than using hardware instructions.
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 3:58 pm   #13
Reelman
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

Sorry to hijack this thread but thank you very much for the comments and explanations, much appreciated. I do have some peripheral vision with the cataract eye but not enough to count the fingers of a raised hand.
Never mind, I’d better just take good care of my right eye.

Peter.
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 4:31 pm   #14
The Philpott
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

Glad it went well for you Joe.

My Pa had intraocular lenses implanted as this was the easiest way to remove the cataracts in both eyes. The lenses were manufactured to prescription so he was almost 'spectacle free' thereafter. One eye did have to be redone almost immediately as a stitch gave way.

This gave me the courage to have my corneas laser etched for myopia (+6) in both eyes. The operation reduced the myopia to 1.25 dioptres, which confused the surgeon a little.
He operated a second time a few months later and i am now one line from the bottom of the chart, ie one grade better than 20:20.
The payoff is presbyopia (reading glasses currently at about 1.5) however i was warned about this and it is a small price to pay.

The fringe benefits were driving at night was much easier courtesy of the smoothed off corneas, and the odd result was lilacs,blues and purples were much more strident after the procedure- something which i must have been missing out on for about 20 years.

Dave
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 4:54 pm   #15
dave walsh
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

All this info is most helpful. I don't have a Cataract problem at present but I have considered the lens implants that are now sometimes available as an alternative to Laser Treatments. The advantage there, of course, is that the inert lens replacement will never cloud over. I was a contact lens pioneer in the sixties but have worn vari or bi-focals for two decades. I had a sudden floater at Xmas a few years ago which, particularly with flashing lights can indicate a possibility of Lens detachment. Fortunately this was not the case but I always have a thorough examination [all round the eyeball electronically these days].

My Optician says the prescription has even improved slighty [the eyes can change shape with age] but it doesn't always seem that way-especially with night vision. I know from previous periods of illness that fatigue can be a considerable factor/indicator re visual acuity so I take that into account!
The eye doesn't do the actual "seeing" after all!

Dave
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 6:23 pm   #16
The Philpott
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

Fatigue or change in hydration certainly does alter acuity. I used to find my prescription improved slightly after a couple of pints of beer.

Across the pond there is such a thing as a 'floater only vitrectomy' but this is a bit too scary and expensive for me- i can live with the little black ghosts as they don't actually obstruct my vision.
Dave
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 10:49 pm   #17
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

To those considering it, I can only mention SWIMBO experience. She went into the unit nearly having kittens, and came out happy. Next day she removed the dressing and could not believe how much the op had changed her vision. So much so that she pushed and shouted to get the other eye done. She had several glasses free years after most of her life dependant on specs. But for those in the early years ( it may be that her case is one of the unlucky ones) of treatment after cateract removal ,she's had incidences where eye doctors reckon she's got minute bits of the old lens floating about ,and although she's had laser treatment, she's now back to needing glasses, although not as strong as in previous years. Hr opinion-go for it-it's painless .
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 10:52 pm   #18
joebog1
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

I did not think my comments would create such interest.
I think the best thing I can do is send this information that was given to me.

Joe
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Information_brochure.pdf (1.53 MB, 22 views)
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Old 5th Sep 2019, 11:12 pm   #19
Oldcodger
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Default Re: Cataract surgery

Joe- I only posted Swimbo's observation of her ops as a bit of advice to those wondering about having it done. She tells me that she had drops galore into her eye, but still had sight till on the table, and her opinion is go for it. In the UK, when she had hers done she had the option of glasses free long distance with the need for reading glasses or vice versa.
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