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Old 3rd Jul 2022, 6:48 pm   #1
G6Tanuki
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Default 1935 General Electric home-automation video.

See https://youtu.be/SVfZCKCzEWg

Fascinating to see ho well-advanced the US was in terms of cookery; us Brits were still making-do with solid-fuel-fired cookers and washing our dishes by hand well into the 1960s.
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Old 4th Jul 2022, 6:27 am   #2
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Default Re: 1935 General Electric home-automation video.

Ah! But we had television.

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Old 4th Jul 2022, 6:52 am   #3
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Default Re: 1935 General Electric home-automation video.

Later things had become smoother, in the Westinghouse Total Electric Home.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyrTgtPTz3M

Ah, America in the Fifties!

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Old 4th Jul 2022, 7:12 am   #4
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Default Re: 1935 General Electric home-automation video.

Space and money! That kitchen covers the total floor space of a small English terraced house! These appliances were available in the UK if you could afford them and had the space to accommodate them in small scullery kitchens.
The Bendix fully automatic washing machine was available in the UK 1936. J.
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Old 4th Jul 2022, 10:43 am   #5
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Default Re: 1935 General Electric home-automation video.

And the US had colour television from 1954.
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Old 5th Jul 2022, 12:40 pm   #6
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Default Re: 1935 General Electric home-automation video.

I noticed that the Westinghouse record changer is a Garrard. Mostly contraptions that created more work than they saved. John.
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Old 6th Jul 2022, 5:22 pm   #7
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Default Re: 1935 General Electric home-automation video.

Quote:
Originally Posted by peter_scott View Post
Ah! But we had television.

Peter
In 1935?
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Old 10th Jul 2022, 12:06 pm   #8
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Default Re: 1935 General Electric home-automation video.

The General Electrics commercial is very impressive.

I think the first televison was before 1930, the picture tube was invented pretty early. The first TVs wasn't for home use, but several sets in a place like a cinema where people visited. I have only seen it from early black and white film taken in Germany, and I think UK too. Some places say the very first transmission was in the US.

I have seen Miele washing machines from the 1930s, rounded shape with a door similar to modern machines. They were bolted to the floor, very solid construction, and was not like the early top loaders.

I don't think many could afford the first refrigerators and home appliances. The info is a bit conflicting, but several places say post WWII was the era these appliances came into mass production and gradually became more affordable. Still quite an investment for the average home.

Inventions are out some time before they become mass produced. Electronics exhibitions show new computer stuff, screens and gadgets years before we see them in Apple or HP products in the store today too.
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Old 10th Jul 2022, 12:12 pm   #9
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Default Re: 1935 General Electric home-automation video.

Quote:
Originally Posted by G6Tanuki View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by peter_scott View Post
Ah! But we had television.

Peter
In 1935?
Bearing in mind Peter's interest in early broadcasting

https://www.bairdtelevision.com/1932...d-in-1952.html

Cheers

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Old 12th Jul 2022, 1:04 pm   #10
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Default Re: 1935 General Electric home-automation video.

-I'm not sure if refrigerators in the US had 'safe' refrigerants by this period...?

Dave
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Old 12th Jul 2022, 1:29 pm   #11
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Default Re: 1935 General Electric home-automation video.

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Originally Posted by The Philpott View Post
-I'm not sure if refrigerators in the US had 'safe' refrigerants by this period...?

Dave
Ammonia was a common refrigerant in early fridges; Sulphur Dioxide [in its liquid form] was also used in some models, as was Carbon Dioxide. Freon (R-12) was invented by Thomas Midgley of DuPont in 1928 as a replacement for Ammonia and soon made its p[resence felt in Frigidaire refrigerators.

There were some domestic non-electric Ammonia-based refrigerators; the Crosley "Icy ball" - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icyball - being an example; made by the same Crosley company that made a lot of radios in the US in the 1930s.

As far as other 'labor saving' appliances in the US were concerned, in the early part of the 20th century the Maytag corporation sold a washing-machine that was powered by a small two-stroke petrol engine for use in those locations which had yet to receive electricity [or which only had low-voltage/low-power farm-type wind-generators].
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