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Old 13th Mar 2024, 2:08 am   #1
SiriusHardware
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Default Music Synthesisers, MIDI and CV / Gate

A current discussion about the Atari ST brought up some discussion of MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) including which Computers / dedicated sequencers had the best timing characteristics.

Before there was MIDI there were purely analogue synths and the method by which they intercommunicated was comparatively crude: The CV / Gate interface. My Roland SH-101 has a CV / Gate interface but no MIDI and I wanted to drive it with my Atari ST, so in the early nineties I set about making a MIDI to CV / Gate interface for it.

Briefly, CV / Gate consists of two signals, a precise analogue voltage, (the 'CV') and a digital (logic-level) Gate signal which, when asserted, tells the connected synth to sound the note represented by the control voltage, and when removed, ends the note.

I understand there are at least two 'voltage to note' scaling standards for the 'CV' voltage - one, the one used by my Roland, is the 'One Volt Per Octave' scale, so if the control voltage which makes the controlled synth sound note C1 is 1.27 volts then the control voltage which makes the synth sound note C2 will be 2.27 volts, for C3 it will be 3.27 volts, C4, 4.27 volts and so on. With 12 notes per octave it follows that to move up or down one note you have to increase or decrease the CV voltage by (1/12 volts, or 0.08333V)

That was the first thing, generating the analogue control voltage. For that, I used a ZN series 8-bit D to A converter followed by an op-amp to amplify the smallest voltage steps coming out of the D-A converter up to steps of 0.08333V.

The second problem was that when I got it working the SH-101 was playing notes exactly one octave higher than expected - so rather than add some sort of analogue 'minus one volt shift' circuit, I just subtracted 12 from the received MIDI note value before outputting it as the equivalent CV voltage. It meant I lost the use of the bottom octave but at least the SH-101 was now playing the same note in the same octave as the source keyboard.

Another issue, this time on the MIDI side, was something called 'running status'. Originally, MIDI note-on and note-off messages consisted of three serially sent characters each, so if you hit three notes simultaneously on your MIDI sending keyboard that would generate nine MIDI bytes. Releasing the three keys would send a further nine MIDI bytes.

'Running status' is a kind of MIDI shorthand which allows the same note on / note off information to be sent as significantly fewer bytes and is now more or less the standard way of sending note on / note off information, although the old / original longhand format is still supported for backward compatibility.

I am surprised that the MIDI standard has apparently never been expanded beyond the original 16 channels and the original 0-127 'presets', the latter being the means by which different sounds (Piano, Flute, Strings, etc) can be selected over MIDI. In my notes for the MIDI-CV converter project I speculated that within a few years there would probably be a MIDI-II standard which would support 64 MIDI channels and a minimum of 1024 presets, but as far as I know that never happened.

What was the first MIDI equipped musical instrument you ever owned, and what did you use it with? For me, it was a Casio CZ-230S - four note polyphonic, but still a big improvement over the crude 3-channel chip sound from the Atari ST's internal sound chip. I used it with Activision's 'The Music Studio' on the Atari ST.
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Old 13th Mar 2024, 2:39 am   #2
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Default Re: Music Synthesisers, MIDI and CV / Gate

Mine predated midi but the keyboard osc was a Dewtron module, this was my one commercial module bought because I didnt think a home-made osc would ever remain in tune.
It was one volt per octave. I recall the inter-key resistors were quite low value - 22 ohms? - presumably to keep the source impedance low enough to avoid the need for a buffer and another possible source of inaccuracy (?)
The only external trigger it had was just a digital pulse input which could be routed to trigger the envelope gen or the ramp gens etc. It did have an external CV input but it wasnt related to triggering - I just had a random sequence gen creating a voltage that stepped randomly at the trigger rate. I never had a commercial synth so never got to play with midi unfortunately. I was taken by John's Nascom midi video and tempted to look for a keyboardless synth of some sort.... too many projects!
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Old 13th Mar 2024, 3:16 am   #3
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Default Re: Music Synthesisers, MIDI and CV / Gate

I'm yet to own a proper MIDI Synth myself, but back in the 80's a friend had recently got a Casio CZ-101, and brought it round for me to test the Everyday Electronics magazine Beeb MIDI Interface - where I discovered it didn't actually work and IIRC I had to put a present in place of a resistor on an opto-coupler and adjust this for it to work.
It may have been that I didn't have the right Optical-gain version of Opto-coupler, as more recently I found that many of these these have a suffix 'Gain' letter like transistors.


Around that time, we did have an old (Korg?) keyboard at School, that had CV & Gate. But I never got that interface to work, only building a battery-powered LM380 amp, to listen to its audio output
Although I'm sure ETI / Maplin had projects back then that interfaced to that - maybe even a MIDI Interface converter?

We also had recently got a Korg Poly 800?, but never had anything to interface it to - All the other Keyboards we had were quite cheap Casio? ones with no interfaces, that I ended up repairing many of the PSU's for as their moulded-plugs didn't last too long in classroom use.
A friend at Uni also later got a used? one of these (probably cost quite a bit of a term's grant!)


I do have the Commodore Music Maker ? full-size Keyboard, so will have to give that a go one day - maybe adding a MIDI Interface to a C64?
Not sure if I could get it to work with the Beeb, as I recall there was an external keyboard available for the 'Island Logic Music System'

I do also have Acorn's 'Music 500' / Hybrid's Music 5000 Synthesiser expansion box for the Beeb: http://chrisacorns.computinghistory...._Music500.html
So it would be good to be able to control that from a proper keyboard.
- It seems it was designed to work with a Music 5000 MIDI Interface, but I'm yet to see one of these: https://www.computinghistory.org.uk/...0-Synthesizer/

I do also recall when Electronic - The Maplin Magazine was launched as an offshoot to Electronics & Music Maker (Which I was given many old issues of, and had many articles on 80's bands), which 'the best of E&MM' featuring a large range of music projects & the Maplin MOSFET Amp (modules) I built, to upgrade their Integrated Amp.
And have some of those Syntom / Synchime / synwave modules, so wonder about controlling those with CV & gate style interface.
http://www.bigbluewave.co.uk/synths_e&mm.htm

I had been tempted to build one of the Maplin Synth projects / the electric piano. But only got as far as getting the instructions / writing-out a parts list (realising how many pots were required!)
That must have followed the period in the 70's, when people used to construct Electronic Organ kits.
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Old 13th Mar 2024, 9:29 am   #4
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Default Re: Music Synthesisers, MIDI and CV / Gate

(RW - Thanks for the thread tidy-up).

Quote:
tempted to look for a keyboardless synth of some sort....
I'm out of touch with the modern 'scene' so I have no idea what you can get, new, in the way of a polyphonic, multitimbral keyboardless MIDI sound module these days. I suspect the trend now is for 'virtual' synths - PC programs which in many cases closely emulate the control panels and sounds of a 'classic' synth or synth module.

Probably foremost among the 'budget' synth modules back in the day was the Roland MT-32 which was (as implied by the model number) both Multitimbral (could 'be' more than one instrument at a time) and 32-note polyphonic. Although the sounds were fully programmable you needed an external computer based program to edit the sounds and the main problem was that its parameter programming memory was volatile - as soon as you powered it off all of your altered sounds were lost, leaving only the original preset sounds.

There was an internal PC card based version of the MT-32, the Roland LAPC1, and the Roland 'Sound Canvas' was an improved version of the MT32 concept.

Yamaha's closest rival was probably their FB-01.

The CZ-101 that Owen mentioned was probably the nearest thing that there was to a 'synth for the people' - a (relatively) low cost keyboard instrument which was, nevertheless a true (FM) synth with alterable / editable sounds. I was offered one FOC a few years ago and turned it down because I already have too much stuff cluttering the place up here - I wish now I had accepted it, if only to play with it and find out what it could do.

Some of the mid-range Yamaha home keyboards had MIDI and were quite good - the PSS680, PSS780 etc range had a 2-operator FM synth so you really could create new sounds on them, and the PSS790 / PSS795 was an amazing piece of kit for the money - the more so now as you can sometimes pick them up for a few tens of pounds - I had access to a PSS790 for a few years back then and on the strength of that, bought a PSS795 for £15 a few years ago.

If you are looking for something 'MIDI' to play around with I would say these would be the best value for money MIDI sound generators you can buy at the present time because even the classic old keyboardless modules like the MT32, FB-01 and so on appear to have gone way back up in price.
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Old 13th Mar 2024, 11:43 am   #5
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Default Re: Music Synthesisers, MIDI and CV / Gate

If you are looking to get into MIDI instruments now is a bad time, as we are living in such a post-modern world, even 90s MIDI synths / samplers are now pricey. I sold my Akai S3200 and K2000 (bought from new…aargh…) for about £150 a piece around 10 years ago, but they are now creeping up in value.

When I started out in studios in the late 80s, CV interfacing was considered anachronistic, only for the most die-hard and wealthy modular owner. Junos, Jupiters and Prophets would be fitted with Kenton interfaces (a UK firm who specialised in MIDI retrofits) and the classifieds were full of these synths at reasonable prices. In 2024, the reverse could be thought of as true. The classic modulars from Moog or Roland cost as much as a house, but there is a burgeoning scene for ‘Eurorack’ modular synths, giving someone getting into a synths a relatively affordable path into purist synths. Ironically, Prophets and Jupiters are crazily collectable (they’ve been reissued, albeit with different chipsets in many cases). I’m not sure anyone tours with classic synths now and some of the staples from my day cost as much as a family car, whereas modular synths (seen as expensive and esoteric in my day) are a far more affordable route than paying many thousand for a decent 70s or 80s classic.

Guide to Eurorack modules: https://modwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=230155

There are hundreds of little OEMs making Euro modules, to the point where we got a Farnell delivery for one based a mile down the road (I delivered it by hand and had a pleasant chat with the owner).

Doepfer have always been good value and their gear is nice. They were years ahead with the MAQ-16, which offers step time / analogue-style sequencing, with the benefit of a MIDI interface: https://www.soundonsound.com/reviews/doepfer-maq163

In the 90s, there was a trend for electronic musicians to step up the game in terms of musicality and fuse real instruments with sequenced ones. Using synths to mimic a horn or a flute was considered naff and looked down upon those who could afford the session players. 30 years on, ironically, many of the ‘we’re being musical, with real instruments’ records made with session players are seen in the bargain bins, whereas some of the quirky records with plastic-sounding MIDI saxes are collectable. Who would’ve thought? I guess it’s because they represent a particular moment in time that’ll never happen again. Modern software means that we can create a very convincing fake sax, and to get that quirky 90s sound you’d have to think like a 90s musician, surrounded by a sea of membrane switches.

My first excursion into MIDI came with a Seqential Tom drum machine. A friend had an Alesis MMT-8 sequencer (famed for its ‘Bummer Dude! Out of memory' message, which would come up at about 3am, just as your best idea was coming out). Another friend had a Kawai K4 and ART FX box. The 3 of us would get together and plug our machines in. I powered speakers via the aforementioned Maplin Hitachi amp (which I have since plugged into an AP analyser and seen to give THD+N performance that would embarrass many amps from today – I kid not, Hitachi really knew what they were doing and the amps were based on their 7500 power amp).

I still have a few synths, but being a business owner and father, I haven’t powered them up in ages (am nervous about powering the Prophet… It was re-capped 20 years ago… Tants are what scares me. I might disconnect various boards and power via lab PSU individually, watching current). The MPC hasn’t been on it years... The MIDIMoog (PCBs out of a real MiniMoog, put into a 19” rack with MIDI, as OG Minimoog was pre-MIDI) needs a service. A keyboard MiniMoog (no MIDI) is more valuable than a MIDIMoog, interestingly (I guess the simple keyboard makes it more fun to turn on and play).

There are many synths I wish I hadn’t sold, as well as even more that I wish I’d bought for a few hundred, now that they are many thousand. Check out PPG Wave prices! Early digital / MIDI synths can be very collectable now. It’s funny to see how what was regarded as the domain of million-selling artists such as Vince Clark (modulars) are now relatively accessible to get into, whereas the bread’n’butter Prophets and Jupiters from my studio days are the domain of wealthy collectors. Even the humble Matrix 1000 module (the world’s most boring synth to look at) will cost you £800+. It becomes very powerful if you know how to program it via MIDI or have a rare hardware programmer.

Who’s ever used System Exclusive? The Juno 106 spits out strings of it when you touch any slider, so you can record and automate all fader movements. I had mine for years before I even tried it. It was a bit heavy on the memory of the MMT-8, though! You could fill the memory with just one track! Better off recording the Juno to tape and syncing (via MIDI of course) the sequencer to it.

Oh, and I agree with Sirius's recommendation of bland-looking MIDI modules if you want to experiment without spending a fortune. They can be very powerful and will teach you everything you need to know.
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Old 13th Mar 2024, 1:11 pm   #6
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Default Re: Music Synthesisers, MIDI and CV / Gate

I mainly use SysEx for backing up and reloading custom sounds - I play with my gear relatively rarely now and quite often by the time I power up my Yamaha SY22 the memory retention 'supercap' has run down and it has 'forgotten' what I last programmed it with. This is one of the ways in which the ST is still handy, I have a self-written bit of software on there which can 'record' or 'play' SysEx data from or to a MIDI synth, so I can save a snapshot of the sounds in it out to the ST and easily reload them if they fade away.

Just lately I've been using a 'Virtual' Atari ST in the form of a Raspberry Pi 4 with a USB-5-DIN MIDI interface running the 'Hatari' ST emulator, which is now so good that it can run ST Cubase 2 pretty well, just as well as real hardware.

The Yamaha SY series of synths SY22, SY35, SY55, SY77, SY85 had corresponding keyboardless synth modules which are not bad, the the "TG" series - for example the TG55 is the keyboardless module version of the SY55 synth.
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Old 13th Mar 2024, 8:31 pm   #7
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This topic sidetracked me into looking around to see if there are any recent videos or other activity involving the Roland SH-101, the oldest synth in my small collection - there are a few items around but I found some interesting reports to the effect that every single SH-101 is likely to be afflicted by now with the same 'failure' where touching the power button causes the main oscillator pitch to change a little bit up or down.

I've just put mine on for the first time in a long time and surely enough the power switch was a little bit noisy / touch sensitive until I exercised it for a minute, after which it worked solidly. I'll have to take the power switch properly apart to clean it. In the meantime, crisis averted. A couple of the sliders sounded a bit crackly too, until I whizzed them back and forwards a few dozen times.

Still sounds great... if growly monophonic basslines are your idea of 'great'.

Knobtwiddler, I definitely think you should turn on that Prophet - it may well have a thing or two which needs sorting out by now but it does these things no good to stand for years, decades, with no power ever applied. The capacitors need to see some voltage every now and again.
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Old 13th Mar 2024, 9:47 pm   #8
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Default Re: Music Synthesisers, MIDI and CV / Gate

Good advice. I think I might disconnect the PSU first and ramp it on with a variac, before turning on the whole synth. I plan to fit a heatsink to the rear, as bizarrely, it simply attaches the Vregs to the steel chassis, with no HS. No wonder they are prone to overheating! It doesn't have a Kenton BTW. Will have to be played the old way, or via CV-MIDI converter.
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Old 13th Mar 2024, 10:10 pm   #9
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Default Re: Music Synthesisers, MIDI and CV / Gate

If you want a keyboardless synth then you are in luck as there are loads of options these days, Behringer have been creating usefully cheap clones of a lot of old stuff including things like the Model D, Kobol, 2600, MS-20 plus a boatload of eurorack modules, there are also a lot of independent manufacturers and the likes of Doepfer who started the whole eurorack thing.

For something a bit interesting with lots of CV control options then a Behringer Kobol is only £170 https://www.thomann.de/gb/behringer_kobol_expander.htm
or a Behringer Neutron which is their own design, https://www.thomann.de/gb/behringer_neutron.htm
If you want polyphony then the 8 voice Pro-800 Pro-600 clone for £300 is stupidly cheap https://www.andertons.co.uk/behringe...-modular-synth.

Plenty of keyboard options too, you can get a 16 voice polysynth with two oscillators per voice and a keybed with both velocity sensitivity and polyphonic aftertouch just under £1000 https://www.andertons.co.uk/keyboard...ehringer-ub-xa

Personally I have a few bits of kit that I've assembled through the years, including interesting things like the GEM/GENERALMUSIC S2 which was the Italians answer to the likes of the D70, SY77, T1/01W but with polyphonic aftertouch and a Roland S330 sampler that is designed to be connected to a monitor and controlled with a mouse!
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Old 13th Mar 2024, 11:05 pm   #10
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Default Re: Music Synthesisers, MIDI and CV / Gate

Quote:
Originally Posted by knobtwiddler View Post
Will have to be played the old way, or via CV-MIDI converter.
Not sure whether that meant you have a MIDI-CV converter for it or not. I have a 'Midimuso' CV12.

https://midimuso.co.uk/index.php/shop/

(Look under the 'CV12' tab).

It's basically a kit of parts, including PCB and programmed microcontroller, to make a MIDI-CV converter. You don't get a case because it is at least partly intended to be retrofitted inside equipment but of course there is nothing to stop you putting it in a case and using it stand-alone. The PCB has a MIDI-in socket on it, connections to the synth's Gate, CV and clock-in signals are via pin row connectors which you take to appropriate sockets on flying leads. You can, optionally, buy pre-made socket-on-cable sets which just plug onto the PCB but they are not provided with the base CV12 kit.

The programmed microcontroller is available by itself if you need to custom build the unit into a particular size / shape / form factor in order to shoehorn it into an available space - or in case you somehow damage the one in your kit.

Price for the PCB+parts kit is a very reasonable £20 (was about £12 when I bought mine a few years ago now). I've still got the original homebrew MIDI-CV converter but it has awkward +5v/+12V/-12V supply rail requirements whereas the Midimuso unit just needs a single supply.

I have no connection to the vendor, other than having bought one myself a few years ago.

dglcomp, thanks for those links as the modern / current stuff is something I really don't know about at all.

Last edited by SiriusHardware; 13th Mar 2024 at 11:32 pm.
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Old 14th Mar 2024, 12:35 am   #11
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Amazing value on that kit, Sirius. I might just build one, thank you!

A piece of kit that I've never come across would let you play a MIDI sequence and convert into a step-time analogue-style sequencer with knobs, so you could tweak it as if it were a step-time sequence. There must be something out there, surely? There will definitely be a plug-in for a virtual version. The Doepfer MAQ-16 lets you create a sequence in step time, just like an ancient analogue sequencer, but then spits out MIDI. It can't be a massive jump to have something like the MAQ, but one that lets you dump a MIDI pattern into it?
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Old 14th Mar 2024, 12:52 am   #12
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Default Re: Music Synthesisers, MIDI and CV / Gate

One recent keyboardless poly synth (4 note polyphony though) is the Roland S-1. I bought one for myself for Christmas and it's amazing. It's inspired by the sounds of the SH-101. TRS MIDI, Sequencer etc. Tiny little thing that runs on a battery but lots of knobs to twiddle.

I also have vintage synths but additional to those I have some of the more recent Behringer stuff like the Model D, Neutron, Crave, TB3 and RD6.

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Old 14th Mar 2024, 9:07 am   #13
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I might just build one, thank you!
The only thing to watch for is that it only supports 'volts per octave' CV output although the actual voltage step per octave is adjustable. If your Prophet uses some other CV scaling system it won't be suitable.
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Old 14th Mar 2024, 11:23 am   #14
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...the Roland S-1 ... It's inspired by the sounds of the SH-101. TRS MIDI, Sequencer etc.
I take it that's the Roland 'Aira' S1? I wasn't even aware of this. What I wouldn't have given for the SH-101 to be four-note poly back in the day. And a few years later, for it to have MIDI built in.

I used to build up tunes, including chords, one track at a time, using a twin deck cassette recorder which had the ability to mix an external source with whatever was playing from deck A to be recorded on deck B - that was my entire set-up. I'd record a first track on deck B, then put the tape in deck A and play along to it and record me and tape 'A' on tape 'B', then swap the tapes over and so on and so forth until I had a tune made from 10 or more monophonic recorded parts all on one stereo tape. Even the drums were just drum-like sounds from the SH-101 with the 'kick' and 'snare' drums recorded separately.

Of course, no matter how much I tried I couldn't get the two decks to run at precisely the same speed so whatever I laid down first would go more and more out of tune, but then so did everything else with each successive 'take', I just had to adjust the master tuning on the 101 a little bit from time to time.

I notice there's also a 'T8' in the Aira range, essentially all the classic Roland drum machines in a single box. The S1 and T8 together would be tremendous - I'm so tempted, but as stated earlier my den is already overflowing with stuff.
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Old 19th Mar 2024, 7:18 pm   #15
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After a few days humming and Ha-ing over (largely very positive) reviews of the Roland Aira units Andrewausfa mentioned, I have ordered myself an S-1 and a T-8. It's actually incredibly rare for me to buy myself a new toy nowadays so I can just about justify it. I may eventually get the 'companion' J-6 as well.

I see the MIDI connections are 3.5mm jacks - anyone who already has one, do you know the wiring for a 3.5mm (presumed mono) jack plug to a 5-pin DIN MIDI socket? - obviously the wires from the jack plug will go to connections 4 and 5 in the DIN female connector, but which way around? I'm looking to make up a pair of MIDI adaptor leads before the units arrive. (I already have quite a few 5-pin 180 degree male-male MIDI leads, so the aim would be to make very short adaptor cables to let me connect these to the units).

It'll be especially nice to be able to use these alongside the old SH-101. I note none of these units has an obvious MIDI THRU connection though, and I might have to knock up a MIDI buffer box with one MIDI in, several OUTs as well.

I didn't realise Behringer had at some point produced an SH-101 clone (the MS-101?) as well.

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Old 19th Mar 2024, 9:29 pm   #16
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Like the OP, my first MIDI-equipped synth was a Casio CZ-230S. Long gone but I still have my own version of the monophonic Maplin Spectrum, which works via its keyboard and CV/Gate signals from an Elektor-designed MIDI-to-CV converter.

I currently also have a Roland JV-1010 and a Roland TD-7, although none of these (regrettably) have had any use recently.

Old post of the Spectrum here (post 25): https://www.vintage-radio.net/forum/...d.php?p=901666

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Old 19th Mar 2024, 9:38 pm   #17
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As a matter of interest Steve, where did you get it from? New or Secondhand? I sold mine locally after about a year to buy something with 'more notes' (more than four note poly), but I loved it all the same. I remember thinking the PCM drumkit was quite meaty. I think mine went to someone who came down from Cramlington to get it.
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Old 19th Mar 2024, 9:46 pm   #18
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Hi Sirius.
I bought it, used, from a friend in the late 80s, early 90s - I can't exactly remember. He lived in Fenham, Newcastle. I subsequently sold it on to a work colleague a couple of years later, in Sunderland.

Like you, I am tempted by the Roland S-1 but feel I should do more with the Roland JV-1010 that I've already got.
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Old 19th Mar 2024, 10:04 pm   #19
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Originally Posted by SiriusHardware View Post
I am surprised that the MIDI standard has apparently never been expanded beyond the original 16 channels and the original 0-127 'presets', the latter being the means by which different sounds (Piano, Flute, Strings, etc) can be selected over MIDI. In my notes for the MIDI-CV converter project I speculated that within a few years there would probably be a MIDI-II standard which would support 64 MIDI channels and a minimum of 1024 presets, but as far as I know that never happened.
The MIDI 2.0 standard exists

https://www.soundonsound.com/music-b...ducing-midi-20

although, despite the enthusiasm shown in that article, there doesn't seem to be that much support for it.

The 128 preset limit hasn't been a limitation for many years now since the introduction of the MIDI bank select command which can select up to 16384 different banks if the receiving device supports them.

I think the first MIDI device that I owned was an Ibanez SDR1000+ effects unit which could send and receive patch changes over MIDI. I did buy a MIDI interface which fitted inside my Roland Juno 6 but never actually got it to work.

My lad is currently building his own Raspberry Pi based synth with an old electronic piano keyboard. He has been inspired by the Yoshimi soft synth so he is planning to add various types of sound generation to it - at this very moment is is working on an additive synth which adds sine waves together in varying proportions and is currently making organ and bell sounds as I type.

He is also inspired by the old Yamaha sound modules, particularly the TX81Z, so his Raspberry Pi synth has a 16x2 character display and a bunch of push buttons to control it - no fancy GUIs here!
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Old 19th Mar 2024, 11:11 pm   #20
SiriusHardware
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Default Re: Music Synthesisers, MIDI and CV / Gate

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He is also inspired by the old Yamaha sound modules, particularly the TX81Z
I have one of those too. Owned from new. You can crank some nice analogue-sounding bass sounds out of them, I seem to recall 'LatelyBass' was a very popular TX81 patch. Maybe a quarter of the sounds I made on mine were synth-bass sounds, in the main trying to replicate what the SH-101 sounded like, but with the added advantage of having MIDI - I didn't have a MIDI-CV converter for the 101 until some years later. I should really get the TX81Z down and check its battery. Sounds were fully editable from the front panel but computer-based editors (running on the Atari ST in my case) made the job a lot easier, and usually had a librarian feature which let you save / sort / reload your custom patches in whatever combination you needed.

In the early days of the R-Pi there was someone on the Raspberry Pi website who was working on a nice soft-synth based on that machine but he didn't seem to want to make it generally available so everyone who was initially interested lost interest - I haven't really kept up with where it got to since then.

Last edited by SiriusHardware; 19th Mar 2024 at 11:18 pm.
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