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Old 7th Dec 2017, 5:28 pm   #41
ms660
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Neat though it may look I can think of things wrong with that so far (in the pics)

Space between shed bottom and base not high enough (think ventilation...think vermin!) 4" for 4ft wide shed, 6" for 8ft wide shed is my recommendation...Based on years of designing, manufacturing and erecting sheds.

Shed looks rubbish to me but I would say that because....amongst other things all the sheds I manufactured had a good quality breather membrane between the cladding and the studs....Trouble is good quality costs.

Anyways you have what you have.

Vapour barrier......Looks like a dew point water trap to me unless your B&Q fibre wood underlay is vapour proof?....Wrong stuff anyways in my opinion, staples through to the outer cladding is like cavity wall ties without drip stops....Would rip it all out including the vapour barrier and fill in between the studs flush with proper insulation then vapour barrier over properly then final finishing board/surface.

If lining the ceiling then make sure everything is lightweight otherwise the roof might be liable to sag and the walls might want to spread out....

Roofing felt test...If you can easily rip the roofing felt with your fingers then its not really fit for purpose in my opinion.

Sorry to be blunt but I've seen it all before, was in the sawmilling/wood/shed/fencing game, many replacements/call outs for other folks's shed and DIY horrors.

Vapour barrier on the warm side of insulation...Not the cold side.

If you want to beef up and isulate the floor then floating floor is the easiest....Jablite, vapour barrier, floor panels...moisture proof T&G chipboard is what I'd go for, glue the joints...easy, "lino" or whatever on top if required.

To support floor joists, reckon on a max span between support centers of 1ft per inch depth of joist, you won't go far wrong with that.

With sheds also think storms....!

Good luck whicheverways.

Lawrence.

Last edited by ms660; 7th Dec 2017 at 5:36 pm.
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Old 7th Dec 2017, 6:02 pm   #42
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Default Re: Workshop lining

My shed is lined with MDF sheets affixed to the uprights. Behind that is a vapour barrier. Behind that, between the uprights, is four inches of loft insulation. The outer skin is weatherboarding. A-frames are wood to avoid opportunities for condensation. Over the top of those is sterling board, then bitumen-coated felt, then spacing battens, then sheet steel roofing.

The whole wooden structure sits atop three courses of breeze blocks, with a DPC. These are founded upon a 18" concrete slab, with a proper DPC. The thing's been up for seven years and there isn't a spot of damp, even amidst papers stored in there.

I've not seen MDF mentioned so far, but the thicker stuff, provided it's used in a proper system, is great, strong enough for sockets, etc., and adds to the insulation. Hope this is helpful.

Regards,
Richard
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Old 7th Dec 2017, 10:36 pm   #43
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Thanks for your honest and candid feedback. It all comes down to quality, cost and time ... good enough will have to be good enough for the next ten years. In theory, the local water board could come along and insist upon it being moved in order to undertake mains drainage remedial work so perhaps it's best not to build anything that's seriously heavy-duty as it probably wouldn't survive being dismantled!
I'm reasonably comfortable with what I've got in terms of functionality vs. outlay.
Best wishes
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Old 13th Feb 2018, 11:52 pm   #44
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Default Re: Workshop lining

In the last day or so, I've made a start on setting up my workshop (shed, man-cave, whatever). The functional requirement was very specific i.e. for all-weather facility for accommodating working test-gear & light tools in support of fixing stuff (and most definitely not as an extended garage/annexe for broken kit awaiting repair, caravan/other domestic ephemera, heavyweight tools or valueless junk).

The windows are double-glazed (supplied by a local company to my specification) & SWMBO's suggestion of reasonably priced horizontal blinds from our local 'Dunelm' outlet works very well.

Internal panelling is Brazilian hardwood plywood (9mm) - left unsanded (to avoid the dust) & finished off with 2 coats of Danish oil. Low energy LED lighting of my own design/build, plus a 2nd hand office desk to act as a workbench. There's 240v technical supplies above the bench (a recycled multi-socket outlet strip recovered from a scrapped equipment rack); a timeswitch operates on Economy 7 overnight to control a 500-2000W oil convector plus a cheap Peltier effect dehumidifier; this keeps the environment dry (and warm, when it needs to be). Running my Tektronix 454 'scope & Hewlett Packard 8640B signal generator helps to keep the place even warmer ... being as how they both have linear power supplies with fan-assisted cooling. I have plans to add a 60watt Solar Panel that will float-charge a 12v leisure battery to run the LED lighting; easy enough as the structure is aligned alnost exactly North-South (hence the requirement for windows, which look out onto the back garden) - and the garage roof is immediately adjacent (and flat).

I've put a 'Screwfix' steel shelving system along one side by the bench to serve as accommodation for essential test gear & tools; I may well get at least one more of these as they're very versatile/robust.

So at long last I've been able to move most of my carefully repaired & working test gear into what is an appropriate non-domestic environment (i.e. out of our dining room where it's all been so carefully stored under wraps for the last year or so ... hence regaining a small number of brownie points with 'Er Indoors'

Some pictures, by way of an update. Everything had to go on hold over Christmas ...

G.

[P.S. - mark_in_manc, mhennessy, BigClick.. note eqpt layout & take a bow ]
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Old 14th Feb 2018, 10:18 pm   #45
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Hey, that looks so much tidier than my work space! How long is it going to stay like that then?
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Old 14th Feb 2018, 10:49 pm   #46
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Guy, consider a de-humidifier on a timer. About 3 hours a day is what my outside shed one is on for. Not only keeps moisture level down, but provides the waste operational output as heat. ie using a compressor driven type, not a cheap toy size silent peltier job! Mine came from a car boot about 10 years ago for a fiver and is in my outside shed.
I also have a wireless linked remote temperature/humidity sensor back to the house kitchen. I can easily keep an eye on what is happening. Temp last week was 3C and 60% humidity. It had stopped working as the tank needed emptying!
Rob
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Old 14th Feb 2018, 11:15 pm   #47
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Default Re: Workshop lining

That's looking great! All that lovely wall-space to fill with component drawers, posters, pin-boards, book shelves, etc. What plans have you got - you'll be able to fit lots in there!

It must be nice to have all those windows at the bench. Light is a problem down here in my cellar - one day I'll get something above ground I reckon you could probably get a decent shelf the whole width across the top of the windows - useful for books or more test gear.

I certainly recognise a few of those bits and pieces - if there's anything else you need, let me know, as my loft is groaning and I really must try and slim down my test gear collection

Well done again - most jealous
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Old 14th Feb 2018, 11:29 pm   #48
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Thanks gentlemen for your kind comments. The big unknown of course is just how hot might it get in the (3 or 4 days of) high summer

I keep referring back to my 'functional spec' by way of reigning in any inclination towards treating it as 'rountuit accommodation - !!
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Old 14th Feb 2018, 11:42 pm   #49
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Default Re: Workshop lining

The Peltier dehumidifier is on a timeswitch already - however, with having insulated the inside of the door in such a way as to minimise draught gaps as well as "through-loss', I've found the amount of condensate produced is now very small - less than 20ml over a two-day period, with it operating between 00:05 - 07:25, as previously mentioned. The convector heater is powered via the same time-switch but its feed is in series with a thermostatically-controlled relay (B&Q unit) that is set to 19C (auto) overnight and 21C (manual) whenever I'm actually in there.

Last edited by Nymrod121; 14th Feb 2018 at 11:46 pm. Reason: details re thermostatic relay
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Old 15th Feb 2018, 10:14 am   #50
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Default Re: Workshop lining

Guy, I hadn't seen that you already had a peltier de-humidifier nor the economy seven. My shed is probably about 10 years old and although insulated does not have a vapour barrier and I imagine is allowing the outside moisture in. I can go days without entering then quite a few trips in and out with the door open a lot. It is at the North end of our plot with the 12' side facing North. The entrance is in one 8' end. This faces another shed 4' away. I enclosed the back of this area with lapped panel and made a roof from twin wall consrrvatory type roofing. The entrance to this "porch" is open but fairly sheltered from any driving rain by our house. This I find is useful for stopping rain entering through the doorway when accessing the shed. It also acts as a junk hole for scrap metal and odds and ends!
My dehumidifier is set to continously run but restricted by the timer. A thermostat control fan heater is used if needed for occasional use.
Although intended as a workshop the not quite junk and other storage predominates. The bench is pretty solid using a kitchen worktop for the surface. Loads of original dexion shelving in there as well.
Rob
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