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Old 5th Feb 2019, 9:06 pm   #21
kalee20
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

Hmm! I'm not impressed... Badly researched article, badly checked! Thumbs down Spectator!
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Old 5th Feb 2019, 11:14 pm   #22
gezza123
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

Ah, well I will not be buying the SPECTATOR they need to do
proper research.
I feel sorry for his friend in Chiswick, she should have listened to
her Architect and had it installed, and as for breathing a sigh off
relief when she cancelled her order he must have shares in a gas
company.
I have built these since the 1980s and have ran and tested to
distruction and they are fine.
still have one in the workshop for twenty years that has never had a
problem.
If they are used correctly and explained how to be used by the public
and not being scare mongerd out of buying one by people who have
no concept of how to use them we would all proberly have them.

As far as not being able to use other pans, you can use any that a
magnet will stick to the bottom called ferrus metal.

Induction heating is not new, I wonder if he has heard of
Mr. Farday in 1831 and Mr.Foucault wrote his paper 1868 called
the Induction of currents in cores.

Induction cooking started in th uk in the 1980s,and there was only
one company in the uk (Stangard induction Ltd)and they bought
there electronics in France from Laurac Industries
I was asked by Shell Tankers could I repair these as the Thyristors
units as they were going faulty, yes yes was my answer and that was
the start of (C.G.M Induction Ltd)and then there were two.

Stangard used thyristors at 25Khz, I used logic with micro chip 8085
family/Eprom Software and a mosfet bridge at 30Khz 3 kWh.
C = Corcoran
G = Gayton
M = Merredith

If you want any more info please PM me as some of this may now
be subject to copyright.
thanks gezza123
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Old 5th Feb 2019, 11:23 pm   #23
gezza123
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

Quote:
Originally Posted by G4YVM David View Post
Does the induction obey inverse square law inasmuch as it would still heat a pot stood off by an inch, say, on wooden blocks or does it need really close contact?
I can set mine to six inches above and still cook. I was one of the tests we did when we went to have it tested i loxbourough to get it passed before they were put on tankers.a setting was required because on ships the pans had to stand in a rack so when the ship rolled the pans would stay and not spill.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kellys_eye View Post
Not necessarily 'conductive'. Aluminium is conductive but won't work on an induction hob.
yes it can but not on the modern cr*p. I will post some spec tomorrow as going to bed now cheers gezza123
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Old 5th Feb 2019, 11:37 pm   #24
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

I recall reading that Ferranti got a patent for the principle of induction heating, but the high cost of electricity at the time meant that it was never commercialised. However, the existence of the long-expired patent prevented a company that re- invented the principle many decades later from patenting it themselves.
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Old 5th Feb 2019, 11:44 pm   #25
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

Hello David you should never put a pan to ofset that what the controls are for, to lower the heat level.
If you do that then you will have the coil overheat as it still radiates high frequency.
the Idea is to put the pan on the ring to use it as the pan becomes the secondary like a transformer/the coil is your primary.
also people put hot pans on the hob and burn out the coil, I don't know why the manufactures don't tell people this I have seen coils go up in smoke dew to bad chef.
take care Gezza123.

Last edited by gezza123; 5th Feb 2019 at 11:45 pm. Reason: spelling
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Old 6th Feb 2019, 12:31 am   #26
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

Hi Gezza,

I only offset the pan a small amount just to make room for the potato croquette and just for only short run. This hob is quite good at sensing if there is not enough coverage of the coil. It also has temperature sensors on the heat sinks and in the coils... I'd have stopped if the fan underneath the hob came on.

Magnetic induction coupling falls off at a faster rate than inverse-square. You may wonder where the energy goes as inverse square law is simple lossless dilution across a greater area... It goes to the creation of an E- field. Maxwells equations describe an alternating mag fiels as expanding outwards and creating an alternating electric field, while at the same time the E field is losing some energy in creating more mag field. Eventually the two settle down into an equilibrium and we have a mature electromagnetic wave (pair) and now we get the inverse square law.

I had a lot of fun in the early seventies mucking about with a magnetic induction telephone for a school friend who was deeply nto caving (horrible pun!) The faster than inverse square law means you need plenty of power and excellent sensitivity to get any useful range. This was all before the more sophisticated carrier-based molephone came on the scene.

David
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Old 6th Feb 2019, 3:44 am   #27
BulgingCap
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

Mrs BC and I have been fans and users of induction hobs for many years (and she is something of a Luddite.) Recently our hippy neighbour arrived at the door wanting to borrow our kitchen, as a recipe she was looking at specified a 'clean sterile kitchen'. She explained that hers wasn't so could she borrow ours. We demonstrated the hob and showed her a pan boiling through a magazine, then I slapped my hand on the 'hot' ring. She backed slowly away, wide-eyed, and said "It's the work of the devil..."
This has become a new catch phrase for Mrs BC.
Regards, BC
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Old 6th Feb 2019, 7:12 am   #28
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

Quote:
Originally Posted by BulgingCap View Post
"It's the work of the devil..."
This has become a new catch phrase for Mrs BC.
Regards, BC
So much of what the people on here do would have got us burned for witchcraft in an earlier age.

Voices coming out of little boxes containing demons... knowing where people are when you can't even see them. Flying through the air. Moving pictures with no stage behind them... more demons! and those moving pictures often show corpses being cut up after murders! Necromancy!

Is there no end to it?

Just wait until the Grand Inquisitor hears!

What's that on the moving pictures now? It says "The Devils" That makes it definite. Where do we find this "Ken Russel"?
We must also ask questions of "Monty Python" when we get hold of him Impersonating agents of the holy office is serious. I see he has a familiar called "Top Cat" and a golem made from a dead parrot. This magic mirror is revealing so much work of satan.

David
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Last edited by Radio Wrangler; 6th Feb 2019 at 7:22 am.
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Old 6th Feb 2019, 7:52 am   #29
G4YVM David
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

Advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic!
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Old 6th Feb 2019, 8:58 am   #30
Electronpusher0
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

Of course on Terry Pratchett's Discworld so much technology including watches, Personal Digital Assistants and Cameras do contain demons......

Peter
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Old 6th Feb 2019, 9:01 am   #31
Electronpusher0
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

Quote:
Originally Posted by G4YVM David View Post
Advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic!
One of Arthur C Clarke's 3 laws:

1 When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.
2 The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible.
3 Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

Peter
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Old 6th Feb 2019, 12:13 pm   #32
kellys_eye
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

Quote:
Originally Posted by gezza123 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by kellys_eye View Post
Not necessarily 'conductive'. Aluminium is conductive but won't work on an induction hob.
yes it can but not on the modern cr*p. I will post some spec tomorrow as going to bed now cheers gezza123
You state yourself that 'holding a magnet against the pan' will show whether it will work or not (ferrous) and aluminium simply won't 'hold a magnet'.

I use them myself and no aluminium pan I have will be 'recognised' by the cooker.

However I am aware of aluminium pans that have steel 'cores' that are made specifically to be used with induction cookers if this is what you are inferring?
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Old 6th Feb 2019, 1:06 pm   #33
GMB
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

Quote:
Originally Posted by gezza123
also people put hot pans on the hob and burn out the coil, I don't know why the manufactures don't tell people this I have seen coils go up in smoke dew to bad chef.
Can you explain the mechanism of this failure as I can't think of how it could be a problem?

I have wondered about trying this technology, but we were early adopters of the "ceramic hob" which I first heard about before they hit the market - the material having been developed for the noses of nuclear warheads.
It was said that they would last indefinitely. This claim appears to be justified as ours is now many decades old - but looks almost exactly as it did on day one!
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Old 6th Feb 2019, 2:11 pm   #34
gezza123
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

Kelly,s eye.
You state yourself that 'holding a magnet against the pan' will show whether it will work or not (ferrous) and aluminium simply won't 'hold a magnet'.

Hello Kelly,s_eye.
Yes I did say that sorry I meant to say NON Ferrous .

Here is some data for you about pans, as stated I have used all sorts of pans on my original hob, to do this the frequency has to be extended which you can not do on a modern hob as they are set to a specific frequency.

If you want to find out more about melting aluminium you need to get the book on the permeability of metals.
thanks for you comment good luck gezza123
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Old 6th Feb 2019, 2:15 pm   #35
gezza123
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Default Re: Induction hobs - a question

hello Bulging cap.
You could try this, it scares them evertime when there is mony to burn.

gezza123
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Old 7th Feb 2019, 10:34 am   #36
Brigham
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emeritus View Post
I recall reading that Ferranti got a patent for the principle of induction heating, but the high cost of electricity at the time meant that it was never commercialised. However, the existence of the long-expired patent prevented a company that re- invented the principle many decades later from patenting it themselves.
Is this for the FALCO Induction Cooker, around 1912?
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