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Old 7th Feb 2019, 11:12 pm   #81
emeritus
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

My Gateway 2000 PC, bought in 1999, is stil in use with my Epson scanner that has a negative/ transparency adaptor that can accomodate negatives up to 4" x 5". I also like the Kodak/Wang imaging software that was bundled with it. I did investigate getting a copy for my laptop, but it would have cost over 400. Likewise, the bundled cut down version of Adobe Photoshop is more than adequate for my purposes. However, it is on its third CRT monitor! I acauired a couple of spares when we had an upgrade at work.

I did buy a LCD monitor but it sent back. It only gave a sharp display at one resolution (not the one I use) and when I tried improving things with a CD it came with that was supposed to enhance performance, it corrupted the os so that the display vanished after less than a minute. To reinstall the original display driver software I had to hook it up to a printer and run it under DOS in command mode, echoing everything to the printer. It has never really been right since, but the stuff I need it for works, so I have left it as it is.

Last edited by emeritus; 7th Feb 2019 at 11:27 pm.
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Old 8th Feb 2019, 11:36 am   #82
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

I thought that way back when I was serving tv etc that having to take a chassis out to change a valve was bad enough, but today, as Glyn explained, getting a back off a tv, it seems not!
Cheers
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Old 8th Feb 2019, 7:52 pm   #83
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

Quote:
Originally Posted by GrimJosef View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyDuell View Post
... In fact there is nothing introduced in the last 30 years that I actually want (and think would improve my life) ...
Are you saying that this place is making you unhappy (Tim Berners-Lee started the world wide web in 1989) ?
If the WWW wouldn't have been invented, we undoubtedly would have had this discussion using a usenet group, possibly called net.radio.vintage Usenet has been around since the early 1980's and still sees some niche use, although mostly for sending attachments instead of having discussions. I've once or twice thought about building forum software on top of a usenet backend but deemed it not worth the effort.
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Old 8th Feb 2019, 11:57 pm   #84
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

The bug I have with quite a few modern assemblies is this: 'Good idea, badly executed'
Even down to the level of the little Casio Digital watches churned out by Argos for sub 16- accurate, bomb-proof, water resistant, backlit, but with a strap that can't be changed and gives way quite quickly if put under any strain (I think Guy would agree with me on this!) This then leaves you with a pocket watch that lasts for years, but can't be worn. They end up glued to the wall of various sheds, where they happily keep going on their massive lithium cell.
Dave
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Old 12th Feb 2019, 2:25 am   #85
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

I was watching a BBC TV show the other day which showed designers stopping members of the public who were throwing away rubbish at a recycling centre. They got the item from the public and made something new of it, then sold it. They gave the owner any profit from the sale. One woman took an old rotatory mower and changed the blades to a fashionable lamp stand. Another guy took an old chair, put some material on it and stencilled Churchill sayings on it. The chair sold for over 900!
I reckon that about 90% of rubbish that goes into bins and dump sites could be converted to something useful. But I am not convinced that any Government wants to really do it.
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Old 12th Feb 2019, 2:44 am   #86
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

At some council recycling centers they are so besotted with safety that even simple penlight cells are considered "untouchable".
Don't let the "safety police" find out where this recycled car battery is or else they might try to arrest the moss and seedlings that have found homes in the cell spaces
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Old 12th Feb 2019, 8:00 am   #87
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

Grubhead, that seems to be how the TV series Salvage Hunters works - use something not for what it would be originally used for but for something totally different and sell it at what I consider ludicrous prices.

Having been in the TV repair trade for some years until I retired it is clear that most of today's consumer electronics items cannot be repaired for a realistic price and involve skills beyond most casual repairers. But I guess it has led to the growth outlets that strip down faulty sets and sell the boards inside for budding repairers to have a go, some of which do seem to do quite well.

Dave
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Old 12th Feb 2019, 8:52 am   #88
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

I've now got an image in my head of someone 'upcycling' a28" CRT TV. Paint the cabinet purple (if that's still fashionable or has come round again). Gently release the vacuum. With a diamond core drill cut a hole at the top of the rear of the tube. In the reverse of putting ships in bottles, remove the shadow mask. Chemically remove the phosphor. Fill with water and tropical fish pepples, sand etc. Arrange artistically.

They'll need a bubbler for oxygenation.

Voila!

Now just decide on the asking price.

David
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Old 12th Feb 2019, 11:50 am   #89
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

For a long time, I've had an image of using a CRT as a sort of geeky decanter. The shadowmask in a colour tube could function as a sediment trap, though there's the problem of the steel tainting a fine vintage. Not to mention the likelihood of phosphor toxicity....
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Old 12th Feb 2019, 12:19 pm   #90
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

Many years ago, the "Railway Modeller" published a reader's letter and photo of a "N" gauge layout built inside the cabinet of an old TV.

In the 1950's my late father used to turn old radio and console TV cases into bedside cupboards and bathroom cabinets.
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Old 12th Feb 2019, 12:33 pm   #91
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

Quote:
Originally Posted by Radio Wrangler View Post
I've now got an image in my head of someone 'upcycling' a28" CRT TV. Paint the cabinet purple (if that's still fashionable or has come round again). Gently release the vacuum. With a diamond core drill cut a hole at the top of the rear of the tube. In the reverse of putting ships in bottles, remove the shadow mask. Chemically remove the phosphor. Fill with water and tropical fish pepples, sand etc. Arrange artistically.

They'll need a bubbler for oxygenation.

Voila!

Now just decide on the asking price.

David
The price is only bound to go up since getting hold of a CRT is going to get more difficult, since they are no longer being made for TV's these days.

It might well be called Salvage Hunters the TV show that I saw.

Somebody on e-bay was selling a lot of old washers for a 5. So you can make money from stuff that is easy to get hold off.
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Old 13th Feb 2019, 8:56 am   #92
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

I think the programme referred to is 'Money for Nothing' Heres a link to a random episode

www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0bl1tw7

The real moneymakers are the producers, of course. The craftsmen and former owners typically make tens or perhaps low hundreds of pounds. The producers will be making thousands per episode.
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Old 14th Feb 2019, 12:17 pm   #93
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

Salvage Hunters is more of an antiques program. He generally repairs items “ sympathetically “ in his words. His warehouse and shop are in Conwy North Wales. I watch the occasional program but I don’t think I will be buying anything.

https://www.drewpritchard.co.uk
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Old 14th Feb 2019, 6:54 pm   #94
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

D.Pritchard, although a dealer, does in my opinion have a conscience and a respect for history. Not all of them do.

On the subject of throw away culture, what were the BBC thinking when they bought the concept for 'The Best House in Town' ..? Four random people visit a town in a minibus and assess three houses in a given area, for Functionality, Ambition,(What..?) and i can't even remember what the third criteria is.. Health warning- your brain may leak out if you watch this programme- even if you ARE obsessed with interior design. It would however suffice to check your horizontal and vertical hold!

Dave
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Old 15th Feb 2019, 10:13 am   #95
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

Mr Pritchard's team of 'restorers' really annoy me.I think the worst example was a beautiful two faced station clock with a mains electric movement. The movement was ripped out and replaced with two separate cheap quartz movements. No thought was given to repairing the original movement as it was dangerous.
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Old 15th Feb 2019, 10:30 am   #96
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

Ah, i didn't see that 'restoration'. (More of a hack, really.) Not good. Probably an attempt to avoid having the (minimal) hassle of a safety test. Product liability, where would we be without it..

Dave
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Old 19th Feb 2019, 1:27 pm   #97
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Default Re: Changing the throw away culture, BBC News

Two favourite examples of thrifty reuse happened over here in NZ in the 70's. One was a lady who hired a rental TV set - after the payments stopped for a while an agent went around and she told him it had stopped working - so she'd converted it to a fish tank!! The other was about some pacific islanders that had emigrated to NZ at a time when power supplies did not exist back in their home island. When they found out that they were charged money for using the electricity for cooking, they turned off the power and tried to run it by lighting a fire in the nice big square compartment underneath the top - they nearly burned down the house as a result.
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