UK Vintage Radio Repair and Restoration Powered By Google Custom Search Vintage Radio Service Data

Go Back   UK Vintage Radio Repair and Restoration Discussion Forum > Specific Vintage Equipment > Vintage Amateur and Military Radio

Notices

Vintage Amateur and Military Radio Amateur/military receivers and transmitters, morse, and any other related vintage comms equipment.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 21st Nov 2019, 3:45 pm   #1
brenellic2000
Octode
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Rye, East Sussex, UK.
Posts: 1,514
Default Ingersoll watches - war time radio and instruments

Ingersoll Watches had manufacturing and assembly plants in London since 1911 and Dublin (Ireland) since 1936 primarily for pocket-watches, but during WW.II were engaged in unidentified "radios and instruments" - the latter covers a multitude of sins!

Does anyone know what these were and does Ingersoll show up in military stores vocabularies or manufacturer's identity codes?

Many thanks,
Barry
brenellic2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st Nov 2019, 11:06 pm   #2
hammarlund 7
Triode
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Ormskirk, Lancashire, UK.
Posts: 11
Default Re: Ingersoll watches - war time radio and instruments

The speaker designed for use with the AR88 has 3 holes to carry a pocket watch holder, possibly for an Ingersoll watch?
hammarlund 7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd Nov 2019, 3:35 am   #3
Argus25
Nonode
 
Argus25's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Maroochydore, Queensland, Australia.
Posts: 2,557
Default Re: Ingersoll watches - war time radio and instruments

Watch carriers seemed popular on a lot of wartime military gear, attached photo of my ZC1. I couldn't find an Ingersoll watch , so I used a Waltham type.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ZC1 Radio2.jpg
Views:	119
Size:	72.4 KB
ID:	194129  
Argus25 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd Nov 2019, 12:01 pm   #4
brenellic2000
Octode
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Rye, East Sussex, UK.
Posts: 1,514
Default Re: Ingersoll watches - war time radio and instruments

Thanks lads, the Ingersoll pocket watch was supplied to the army c.1920-26 when declared obsolete and again c.1934 to 1946 when disposed (though they appear to have remained on the vocabulary until 1957). These were mostly for GSTP duties or WT, so 'radio and instruments' may have been a cunning ruse to confuse the enemy!
brenellic2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd Nov 2019, 1:20 pm   #5
G6Tanuki
Dekatron
 
G6Tanuki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Wiltshire, UK.
Posts: 7,916
Default Re: Ingersoll watches - war time radio and instruments

Yes, there were several different pocket-watches used with the WWII radios; different watch-makers used different-thickness 'winder' spindles and it's not unusual to find the bakelite pocket-watch holder on a radio has a bit broken out of the spindle-slot in order to accept a watch with a thicker winder-spindle.

As to what Ingersoll may have made during Wartime - well, could be almost anything clockwork - I've seen a "Gent" artillery-ranging calculator (used to set the Az/El of a gun, given range/air-temperature/wind-speed) and a Smiths bomb-trajectory clock used in WWII aircraft.
G6Tanuki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd Nov 2019, 1:50 pm   #6
Nickthedentist
Dekatron
 
Nickthedentist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Oxford, UK.
Posts: 14,463
Default Re: Ingersoll watches - war time radio and instruments

As a clock person, there are loads of references to Ingersoll clock movements in the textbooks of the time. But I've only ever seen one Ingersoll clock in the flesh, and that was an unexciting, postwar, mantle timepiece with a Smiths "Model D" platform-escapement movement.

"Ingersoll" radios to me conjures up 1970s rebranded transistor sets from Hong-Kong.

So the surving examples of clocks and radios seem to be re-brands from what I've encountered.

Nick.

Last edited by Nickthedentist; 22nd Nov 2019 at 1:58 pm.
Nickthedentist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd Nov 2019, 2:05 pm   #7
paulsherwin
Moderator
 
paulsherwin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Oxford, UK
Posts: 18,685
Default Re: Ingersoll watches - war time radio and instruments

Wikipedia has some patchy info about American and British Ingersoll: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingersoll_Watch_Company
paulsherwin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd Nov 2019, 2:33 pm   #8
HamishBoxer
Dekatron
 
HamishBoxer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: W.Butterwick, near Doncaster UK.
Posts: 7,011
Default Re: Ingersoll watches - war time radio and instruments

I have an Ingersoll Leader Radio Lite pocket watch, I guess it means radio active not designed for a radio as such.
The winder does not quite fit in the standard pocket watch holder on the 19 set.

Black face white numerals it looks quite sinister.
__________________
G8JET BVWS Member and V.M.A.R.S
HamishBoxer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd Nov 2019, 11:18 am   #9
brenellic2000
Octode
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Rye, East Sussex, UK.
Posts: 1,514
Default Re: Ingersoll watches - war time radio and instruments

Good point re different winding stem sizes; perhaps their clandestine 'radio and instruments' work relates to holders. Early 8-day aircraft and motor-car dashboard clocks had extended winding stems for gloved hands. Smiths RFC/RAF MkIV aircraft clocks had vulcanised rubber holders instead of the usual brass.

'Radiolite' does indeed relate to radium 227 zinc sulphide (?) luminous paint first used by Ingersoll in 1913; Ingersoll reckoned 85% of their war-time sales were luminous (said to have been much used by tank crews).

Post-WWII lngersoll marketed many Smiths-made clocks in addition to their joint AngloCeltic watches, well into the late 1970s when Smiths pulled out of time pieces altogether.
brenellic2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 4:27 am.


All information and advice on this forum is subject to the WARNING AND DISCLAIMER located at https://www.vintage-radio.net/rules.html.
Failure to heed this warning may result in death or serious injury to yourself and/or others.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2002 - 2019, Paul Stenning.