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Old 22nd Sep 2022, 3:04 pm   #21
dave walsh
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Default Re: Bradford museum exhibit changes

The blatant removal of the photographic collection to London against a great deal of local and national opposition, flagged up what was going to happen-the beginning of the end if you like or "levelling down". I used to visit with my lads when some of the Hunkin [p12] models were on exhibit, eg the TV interlace demonstrated by rows of string and a cardboard red flying spot moved along by turning a handle. Basic but effective! There was also a great micro to Macro electronic screen that took you from atoms to the Galaxies and back again. You could fly on a magic carpet too [back projection].

I recall being there once and trying to decide whether I could afford to buy a book about Tarkovsky, the Russian film maker. I went in search of a Guardian very late in the day but finally found one [just around the corner]. When I opened it at the Museum Cafe I saw that he had just died of cancer, having been exiled from both Russia and his son. I made a puchase! Around 1990 I took my son to see 2001 A Space Odyssey on the Museum's huge five story screen. We were near the projection booth and could see the 70mm film being projected from a flat bed set up "Horizontally" [literally widescreen]

For some reason this great work was out of favour here and they could only source a print from Sweden [with swedish sub-titles]. Despite this and the slightly disconcerting fact that the huge print still only covered the middle fifth of the screen, it was enjoyable to get there in the end and watch it. We only just managed that as I was fatigued with M E at the time which could lead to confusion. I remember going around the roundabout in Bradford centre a few times with my son saying "it's over there Dad!" Funny now but not so much at the time

Dave W

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Old 22nd Sep 2022, 6:59 pm   #22
Uncle Bulgaria
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Default Re: Bradford museum exhibit changes

Ah Tarkovsky, my favourite director!

To add some positivity to this thread, I was at the Marstal Seafarers' Museum in Denmark last month and it was the most wonderful museum I've been to in a great many years. I had to go back two days running as there was so much to see, and that was with one of their buildings out of action.

Rooms of paintings, ships in bottles, dioramas, knots, whole sections of real ships built into the museum with hatches to look through, the bridge and saloon of a mid-century steamer with moving canvas backdrop outside the clearview screens giving the illusion of steaming through the night (with all equipment there to be fiddled with from DF radio to chart to helmsman's controls), galleries of souvenirs brought back by the seafarers...it was vast, engaging and informative despite being only partly in English.

A proper old-fashioned museum where the exhibits do the talking, but many can be touched and it can be seen how they worked. I can't praise it enough, and the Falmouth Maritime Museum can learn a great deal from it...
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Old 23rd Sep 2022, 12:55 am   #23
dave walsh
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Default Re: Bradford museum exhibit changes

My ex-wife lives in Denmark UB so I might get to check out that very interesting Museum you have described. The Tarkovsky film most appropriate to current circumstances, I think, is "Sacrifice" You will know why.

I meant to mention JLB's Grandson, Iain Baird, who came over from Canada some years ago and was the Curator at the Bradford Museum for quite a while, in it's previous existence! He is very well known within the Vintage TV academic community. His father Malcolm was in regular contact with the Bexhill Observer when JLB's previous home, opposite the Station here in the town, was demolished.

Two large blocks of flats are now on the site. One is named Baird Court and the other Helensburgh [where he is buried]. There is also a Blue Plaque "donated" by the developers, with a little encouragement from the newspaper and myself. I think Iain came down for that event but he left the Museum subsequently. I'm guessing he was out of step with the new trends eg "John Logie Baird's grandson reveals why he shuns modern technology despite family history" the Daily Record 14/11/12! He is now a freelance Consultant and researcher in Shipley Yorks, where he curated an exhibition re the little known Pratt Wireless Relay Company, that had connections with his Grandfather back in the 1920's.

Dave W
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Old 23rd Sep 2022, 7:42 am   #24
PaulM
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Default Re: Bradford museum exhibit changes

Further to my Post #14 on this thread, I can say that the policy with our new museum is that it won't be 'dumbed down'. We will explain things - as we did at the Heritage Open Days last weekend. We won't be excluding things that might be hard to explain to the public. A Quadruplex VTR is pretty complicated, but it's still a video recorder!

Some items are harder - how do you explain DICE (Digital Intercontinental Conversion Equipment) which, although from the mid 70s, digitally converts PAL 625/50 to NTSC 525/60 and vice versa. That was the first time that 'digital' had done something significant in the video domain. It was designed by the IBA and broke genuine new ground. Bradford would these days not be able to 'interpret' that because it's assumed to be too difficult. It isn't, it can be done.

For the record, we will be showing domestic televisions too, but that is not our primary target - it's about the broadcast side to include radio, TV, studios, outside broadcast and transmission.

We are now on Google Map as the Broadcast Engineering Museum.
See: tinyurl.com/ykez4msp

Our next opening is still to be decided - last weekend's Heritage Open Days was just a start! However, we're happy to show individuals and small parties around by prior appointment.

Best regards,

Paul M
Broadcast Engineering Conservation Group
Broadcast Engineering Museum
www.becg.tv
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Old Yesterday, 1:18 pm   #25
peter_scott
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Default Re: Bradford museum exhibit changes

After abandoning the National Museum of Scotland about a decade ago because of its dumbed down presentation I returned for another look this morning. I would say that it's not quite as bad as previously but still very disjointed and given the miniscule number of items they choose to display from their extensive collection I think their choices are poorly selected. The three photos below are the total of their television exhibits and each is in a totally different part of the museum.

Apologies for the glass reflections. I don't have a polarising filter for my phone.

Peter
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Old Yesterday, 1:38 pm   #26
stevehertz
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Default Re: Bradford museum exhibit changes

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulM View Post
Further to my Post #14 on this thread, I can say that the policy with our new museum is that it won't be 'dumbed down'. We will explain things - as we did at the Heritage Open Days last weekend. We won't be excluding things that might be hard to explain to the public. A Quadruplex VTR is pretty complicated, but it's still a video recorder!

Some items are harder - how do you explain DICE (Digital Intercontinental Conversion Equipment) which, although from the mid 70s, digitally converts PAL 625/50 to NTSC 525/60 and vice versa. That was the first time that 'digital' had done something significant in the video domain. It was designed by the IBA and broke genuine new ground. Bradford would these days not be able to 'interpret' that because it's assumed to be too difficult. It isn't, it can be done.

For the record, we will be showing domestic televisions too, but that is not our primary target - it's about the broadcast side to include radio, TV, studios, outside broadcast and transmission.

We are now on Google Map as the Broadcast Engineering Museum.
See: tinyurl.com/ykez4msp

Our next opening is still to be decided - last weekend's Heritage Open Days was just a start! However, we're happy to show individuals and small parties around by prior appointment.

Best regards,

Paul M
Broadcast Engineering Conservation Group
Broadcast Engineering Museum
www.becg.tv
You seem to be stating quite clearly there that vintage TV stuff (the reason for this thread and your stated aim to fix with your museum) will not feature heavily in your displays.
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Old Yesterday, 4:34 pm   #27
PaulM
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Default Re: Bradford museum exhibit changes

That's not quite what I've said or implied.

Back in its heyday, the Bradford museum didn't major on domestic TV sets - it had lots of them in the collection, but the public display was very limited indeed. I was involved with some of the sets at one point, but especially with the broadcast side, so I really knew it quite well. There were very, very few - if any to my recollection - radio sets and that is also something that we may feature. It's the broadcast side that people mainly remember about the 'old' Bradford museum. The 'sleeping beauty' set being a frequent example cited.

Like Bradford as it was, our forte and focus will also be broadcasting equipment and its history. However, as a balance we do intend to set up some displays of domestic sets in appropriate period living room settings. We have a lot of small rooms and some of those lend themselves to that sort of approach to 'interpretation'. One thing that we can't do that Bradford could do, is original 30 line equipment and hardware, although we will have something on show to be representative of that era. We would love to talk to someone who might be interested in that area.

Hope this clarifies what we're about. We've committed a lot of our time and money to this project and we do need help!

Best regards,

Paul M
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