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Vintage Amateur and Military Radio Amateur/military receivers and transmitters, morse, and any other related vintage comms equipment.

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Old 4th Oct 2022, 7:34 am   #1
QWENIX
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Default Burndept aerial connectors

Burndept plugs for aerials to connect onto the sockets of Racal Pye Reesmace larkspur equipment are stuffed with a kind of orange wax.

I guess this is done to protect the solder spot and screening mesh against water moist and air.

Who can give the correct info about this wax ?

Is it a kind of bees wax or is it a kind of artificial industrial wax.

Is it for sale somewhere?

kind regards Qwenix
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Old 4th Oct 2022, 7:41 am   #2
stevehertz
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Default Re: Burndept aerial connectors

I don't know what it is, but you can buy wax sticks in a variety of colours. I use brown ones to melt into chips on wooden and bakelite cabinets.
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Old 4th Oct 2022, 12:13 pm   #3
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Default Re: Burndept aerial connectors

Your mention of Racal and "Larkspur" actually refers to two similar but different connector types that were originally designed by the Signals Research & Development Establishment (SRDE at Christchurch, Hants) in the late 1940s as a post-war standard RF connector to replace such as the war-time Pye and the US PL259 and various others.

The robust plated brass versions used on Larkspur and military kit are properly called Pattern 4 and were designed for panclimatic outdoor use and primarily for that reason were specified to be filled with Okerin 3700 wax. When so sealed, the nominal characteristic impedance was quoted as 60 Ohms.
They became popularly known as Burndept connectors although Burnept were only one of several manufacturers of them including Pye and EMI.

Okerin was a brand name for various industrial wax products of Astor, Bosselier & Lawrence Ltd of West Drayton, Middlesex. Now owned by Valan Wax Products Ltd of Reddich, part of the Paramelt group. In Holland they are Paramelt Veendam B.V.

The similar connectors used on Racal RA17s etc are light alloy construction and known as Pattern 40. These are used where light weight is required such as aircraft applications and for "indoor" situations where weatherproofing isn't needed. These are not generally sealed but in cases where this is required, more modern polymer sealants are used.

Pattern 4 and Pattern 40 series will inter-mate but this is not recommended as any moisture and dissimilar metals will rapidly cause corrosion.

Last edited by 2000 type; 4th Oct 2022 at 12:19 pm. Reason: Added Holland info
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Old 4th Oct 2022, 3:33 pm   #4
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Default Re: Burndept aerial connectors

Here’s a picture of the connector i mean.
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Old 4th Oct 2022, 4:23 pm   #5
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Default Re: Burndept aerial connectors

Yes, a Pattern 4 free socket. 5935-99-054-0022.
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Old 5th Oct 2022, 2:34 pm   #6
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Default Re: Burndept aerial connectors

There's also the smaller ones called 'Pattern 12" as used on things like the IF-Out socket of the R209 and for inter-unit links in loads of 50s/60s Military stuff.

One coaxial connector I have only come across in a single application is the small type used for inter-module wiring in the Standard Radio R4187 receiver [as used in V-bombers]. It's just a push-in type, no mechanical locking arrangement. Strange, since I would have considered a four-engined jet aircraft to be just the sort of high-vibration environment where a positive retention would be most needed!
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