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Vintage Amateur and Military Radio Amateur/military receivers and transmitters, morse, and any other related vintage comms equipment.

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Old 11th Feb 2019, 10:21 am   #1
Humptydumpty
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Default Switch is very hard to turn .Trio 9R 59D.

Would it be possible to purchase a switch lubricant . The Function switch along with Band Change are hard to move . I have used switch cleaner and i think this might have caused it .Along with the wrong type of knobs fitted .
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Old 11th Feb 2019, 10:53 am   #2
newlite4
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Default Re: Switch is very hard to turn .Trio 9R 59D.

Whenever I encounter "hard to turn" rotary switches, I normally remove one of the two detente balls from the switch mechanism, no point risking a broken knob or painful fingers. I see from web images that both switches are easily accessible from underneath. Just pop one out and it will be much easier to turn.
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Old 11th Feb 2019, 11:00 am   #3
Radio Wrangler
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Default Re: Switch is very hard to turn .Trio 9R 59D.

Some switches operate the plate spring of their detent as a see-saw balance-beam balancing the force between two detent balls on opposite sides. Taking one ball out doesn't work on these, the whole thing goes slack or falls apart, but slightly smaller balls is an option.

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Old 11th Feb 2019, 11:00 am   #4
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Default Re: Switch is very hard to turn .Trio 9R 59D.

I have found that a spot of ordinary oil at the spot behind the knob where the shaft goes into the threaded part will ease this problem,wiggle the shaft around a bit to let the oil in. Les
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Old 11th Feb 2019, 11:01 am   #5
Andrew2
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Default Re: Switch is very hard to turn .Trio 9R 59D.

It's usually congealed grease in the mechanism. See if you can squirt some switch cleaner between the shaft and the bush, leave for a little while and then operate the switch repeatedly to free it up. Once it's OK, a drop or two of oil will keep it free.
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Old 11th Feb 2019, 11:33 am   #6
Humptydumpty
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Default Re: Switch is very hard to turn .Trio 9R 59D.

Good new ,so i can use a little oil on the ballbearings . I was thinking the switch would be electronic and oil will cause problems . But like you all say they are machanical . I will give it a try . Thank you Andrew David and Neil and T/Radio for the information .
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Old 11th Feb 2019, 12:31 pm   #7
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Default Re: Switch is very hard to turn .Trio 9R 59D.

This sounds like one of those cases where 10 different people have 11 different approaches, but I'd be inclined to use just a trace of petroleum jelly, e.g. Vaseline, applied to the balls with a screwdriver tip, and a trace of light spindle oil to the point where the spindle enters the threaded bush- often there's a circlip here. A bit like clock mechanisms, rotary switches are best with just a sparing amount of appropriate lubricant in the right place. Otherwise, excess lubricant just becomes a dusty paste and may eventually seep into contacts, especially in warm-running kit.

I recently worked on a piece of kit with one of those co-axial rotary switch and potentiometer shafts, they had seized together and nothing would shift them- spindle oil, Gunk release fluid, heat, leaving for days. In the end with nothing to lose, I stripped the switch assembly to its bare mechanics and used an engine valve spring compressor to separate the shafts- there was a graunch, judder, judder and a very rusty inner shaft emerged for a thorough polishing, lubing and re-assembly. The fun of vintage kit....
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