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Vintage Test Gear and Workshop Equipment For discussions about vintage test gear and workshop equipment such as coil winders.

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Old 10th Jun 2019, 7:15 am   #21
AndyGilham
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Default Re: AVO CT38 Multimeter

PMM,
The opened instrument certainly did conjure up some interest. We were looking at how incredible neat and professional the wiring looms were. These instruments took time, care and patience to build. It would be fantastic to have this in a clear cases, I may consider that an option for the museum.

I have no intentional of powering the instrument up, I am a mechanical engineer, and not prepared to play around with mains. Although if any of my ' electron type colleagues in the office want to go for it, they will be welcome, but thus far, they do not have that much interest.

Regarding the material in the base, I have taken some photos.

Andy
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Old 10th Jun 2019, 9:11 am   #22
Radio Wrangler
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Default Re: AVO CT38 Multimeter

Coconut matting?

Never noticed it in mine.

David
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Old 10th Jun 2019, 9:26 am   #23
M0FYA Andy
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Default Re: AVO CT38 Multimeter

That matting material looks rather like the stuff I've seen used to pack military equipment in a transit case, it seems to be made of rubber-sprayed hairy fibres of some sort. Horse hair? Coconut fibres sound quite plausible. Certainly not asbestos IMHO.

The quality of manufacture is a prime reason why I am only interested in military equipment. The average piece of vintage domestic electronics just looks like junk to me, a rat's nest of junk. Of course there are good reasons, horses for courses, it is made to be affordable. But it just doesn't inspire me!

Andy
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Old 10th Jun 2019, 11:23 am   #24
pmmunro
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Default Re: AVO CT38 Multimeter

Andy,

Thanks for the information in the photographs. I would agree with David and Andy MOYFA that it looks like ruberised organic fibre but it would be worth having it checked; I think your local authority should have an asbestos officer who should be able to advise you and this may be some use http://www.hse.gov.uk/asbestos/gallery.htm.

At the risk of sounding facetious, which I don't intend to be, have you asked AVO? i.e. Is there anything, such as a parts list, in your records? I would expect that for a ministry contract there would once have been very full documentation.


Andy MOYFA,

I can empathise with your views on equipment quality having "grown up" in the world of broadcast equipment which was considered to be second only to military standard, and then sometimes grudgingly. Medical equipment would be in a similar class.

Sadly those few manufacturers who attempted to set high standards usually seem to have found it uneconomic. I am thinking of a Bush television set which was constructed as a circular cage with four pressed aluminium sub-chassis which I remember as having corresponding cover plates. I was told that they had drawn on experience of making military radar sets but I have no way of knowing if this was just speculation.

PMM
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Old 31st Jul 2019, 5:43 pm   #25
Sinewave
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Default Re: AVO CT38 Multimeter

Andy, do you know if yours is a working example?

I've just managed to pick one of these up, but I suspect my movement to be o/c, on that basis I do hope I haven't paid too much for mine!
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Old 31st Jul 2019, 6:06 pm   #26
turretslug
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Default Re: AVO CT38 Multimeter

I recall bales of that packing stuff around Dad's garage as a kid- cast-offs from packing military kit of every sort in its sturdy cardboard boxes or wooden crates. I agree with M0FYA Andy that it seemed to consist of congealed latex binding some sort of stiff, resilient hair, holding it all together as a strong and probably very effective protective material. A distinctive smell, not unpleasant but no rival to eau de cologne! As can be imagined, it burned well with a truly horrendous smoke, and that makes me pretty certain that there's no asbestos or other mineral fibre involved.
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Old 1st Aug 2019, 10:27 am   #27
Mike. Watterson
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Default Re: AVO CT38 Multimeter

Possibly coconut fibre + latex?
I got a radio from ebay packed with sheets of it in the last few years. It certainly stinks. I'm reasonably convinced the fibres are from coconut; I'm not sure what the glue is.
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