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Other Vintage Household Electrical or Electromechanical Items For discussions about other vintage (over 25 years old) electrical and electromechanical household items. See the sticky thread for details.

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Old 11th Aug 2018, 1:40 pm   #21
ms660
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

Reminds me of the dentist.

"Yer teeth are ok but yer gums will have to come out"

Lawrence.
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Old 11th Aug 2018, 3:50 pm   #22
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

My father was obviously more of a Black & Decker fan... never seen this one before, so I guess it pre-dates the Selecta (?).

Model looks like 'D500', 1/4" chuck with key, and working.
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Old 11th Aug 2018, 4:11 pm   #23
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

Early sixties I would guess, at some point they upped the chuck to 5/16 so this would be a fairly early example - looks to be in good nick.
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Old 11th Aug 2018, 5:14 pm   #24
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

D700 (5/16") with 'electronic little friend', also fixed and ratchet morse taper braces, these are the oldest ones i have, but frequently used. I got a full set of sheffield made wood auger bits off ebay, a lucky but expensive find- i am told they're still made in china but are sub-standard by comparison.

The fixed brace was hoiked out of the scrap metal skip at the local tip, no conscience about this.. all too easy to forget just how hot wood augers get, if you don't use them on a regular basis!

Once i had seen blue sparks or green flames coming from the back of B&D's a few times it convinced me that i wanted a devoted RCD even if it just meant i could concentrate more on the actual job in hand.

Dave
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Old 11th Aug 2018, 9:16 pm   #25
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

My Dad had a Bridges Electric drill when I was kid, used it for all sorts of things for which it was not meant, and it was still working after many years of abuse.
As I recall the drill had a neon light on the top to indicate that it was plugged in to the mains the right way round.
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Old 12th Aug 2018, 2:01 am   #26
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

I bought my first drill, a Black & Decker D500, when I was a youngster. It's shown in the last picture below complete with its original box and instructions. Regardless of the price shown on the box, I seem to remember that I sent away for it from a special offer in Exchange & Mart and it came with various free accessories and was less than the price shown. I bought the circular saw attachment for it and eventually managed to burn out the armature. I got a replacement armature from a little shop that stocked such things at a place called Uddingston, just outside Glasgow - anyone remember this shop and what it was called? The replacement armature seemed to be of far better quality than the original one and the drill still works to this day. It's spent nearly all its life fitted with the circular saw attachment which has had a lot of use, and the original 3/8" chuck was fitted to the D520 shown next to it to replace its much smaller one. The D520 was given to me in the early 70s when someone was having a clear out, and became my regular drill for many years and is still working well.

Below is a list of some of my drills with pictures in order at the bottom;

1) Wolf type NW4c/F, 230/250v AC/DC on pillar stand in regular use.

2) Black & Decker 1/2" 'Special Drill', type HB, 235/250v AC/DC,1.5 amp, 375 rpm. Used to power a bench grinder - a lot of inefficiency and losses in that gearing being geared all the way down in the drill, then all the way up again on the grinder, which would have originally been hand cranked. In working order and in use.

3) Wolf light production drill 1/4", type EG2c H, 220/250v, 2800 rpm. I think this came with the B&D D520 - a good drill still in use.

4) Stanley Bridges, 'General Purpose' 5/16" drill, type DR2T, 240v AC, 1.4 amps, 325 watts, 2950 rpm. Mounted on a pillar stand, complete with other accessories and instructions - hasn't been used for many years.

5) My original Black & Decker Super D500 3/8" drill. Also the B&D D520 two speed drill, which replaced it as a general use drill when the D500 became a permanent circular saw power unit. The D520 originally had a 5/16" chuck, 270 watts, 900 & 2400 rpm. This drill is probably quite a bit older than the D500.
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Old 12th Aug 2018, 2:54 am   #27
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

I spy a switched MK plug in picture 3.
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Old 12th Aug 2018, 6:30 pm   #28
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

So, my earliest memory of drills was my Dad's B&D. Bought in some kind of sale in Tesco. In those days, B&D sold accessories and kits. So he bought a circular saw kit which was a drill with and adaptor. He realised that by buying a chuck in our local hardware store he would get a drill. Saying that I think he had had something previously that was borrowed and destroyed. He had quite a set of the various attachments (orbital sander, jigsaw) to go with the circular saw.

My first drill was a B&D two speed hammer drill bought for me as an 18th present (a lot of years ago). I reckon it's still in a box somewhere. I have to say my subsequent Bosch purchases were much better.
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Old 12th Aug 2018, 11:10 pm   #29
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

ISTR my Dad had a Bridges drill, I had a clockwork replica!
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Old 13th Aug 2018, 11:11 am   #30
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

A 1951 Wolf ad, Motor Show.
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Old 13th Aug 2018, 1:03 pm   #31
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

And this is fascinating ... I had no idea they go back this far, and B&D were pioneers...https://theconversation.com/powerful...ustralia-81473
Before Alonzo G. Decker and Samuel D. Black intervened in the 1910s, the machines typically required the use of both hands. The two men, founders of the eponymous American company Black & Decker, developed a portable electric drill that incorporated a pistol grip and trigger switch, apparently inspired by Samuel Coltís pistol.
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Old 13th Aug 2018, 2:00 pm   #32
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

I have never sen a DeSouter drill in the flesh, but I remember that a couple of decades ago DeSouter ran a series of ads in the quality press announcing that, while they were about to discontinue manufacture of their electric "little horses", manufacture of their pneumatically-powered ones would continue.
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Old 13th Aug 2018, 7:13 pm   #33
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OK, here goes. I've got well over a dozen drills but most are pretty recent. So here are the interesting ones.

We start with the oldest one, a floorstanding pillar drill by Qualters and Smith who although being one of the most revered names in these things committed a superbly embarrassing goof. The label showing belt positions versus speeds has them in reversed order! The smallest pulley on the motor driving the biggest pulley on the quill shaft is labelled with the highest speed

It's a fabulous machine it has back gears taking it down to 80rpm at immense torque.

Next up for the benefit of Emeritus is an air powered Desoutter 'little horse' it has an eighth inch collet chuck and can spin Dremel bits to speeds where they fly apart somewhere around 200,000 rpm It makes sounds like a dentist's drill on steroids.

Third is something new, what it takes to drive that little Desoutter, all three horses of it can't quite keep up with the little one.

Then there's a 1980 Hitachi. Not vintage yet, but seemingly indestructible it's worn out three chucks and has survived serious misuse.

Lastly a Stanley continental geared brace. Two speeds. Wonderful.

David
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Old 13th Aug 2018, 11:05 pm   #34
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

There's certainly some interesting drills and stories being posted. I seem to remember that there's been a previous thread on this subject, although I can't remember contributing to it myself - if I can find it later (or if someone else can) I'll put a link to it in this thread for completeness.

Here's a couple more drills;

1) Black & Decker GD96, 13mm drill, 3 amp, 40 watts, 2 speed 750 & 1850 rpm, I can't read the voltage. I was given this drill years ago due to it being possibly faulty with excessive sparking at the commutator (sparking shown in the first picture below). I've never investigated it or even used it, but trying it today it certainly has plenty of power and doesn't smoke or overheat. Looking very closely at the voltage section of the specification plate I think I can possibly see a '1' and possibly a '5', but it's not clear, so I'm now for the first time wondering whether it's actually for use on normal mains voltage, or for a 'lower' voltage - no wonder it seems to have a lot of power and sparks if this is the case!

2)Tooltec Hammer, 13mm drill, 230v, 500 watts, 0 - 3000 rpm. Bought this a few years ago from a local discount supermarket. Not particularly vintage, but has been a really good drill. Cost less than a fiver brand new, I think it was actually something like £4.99 (which was about the same as I paid for the D500 sometime around 1968 I think, albeit at a discount price at the time) - how do they make something like this for that sort of price?
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Old 13th Aug 2018, 11:23 pm   #35
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

I have one of those metal Wolf ones somewhere, but it's jammed solid, so I daren't plug it in.
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Old 13th Aug 2018, 11:49 pm   #36
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I've had another look at the D500 earlier today and taken the data off the specification plate;

B & D Super 3/8 10mm drill. Type 1 T, 200/250v AC 25-60 c/s.

I've had a look at some of the accessories. The ones that actually came with the drill were I think the sanding disc pad with a pack of discs, some drills, the 'arbor' shown with the grinding wheel which was also thrown in. This 'arbor' was also intended to be used with a circular saw blade that was also supplier free with the 'kit'. The saw blade was the same size as the one shown on the attachment but with much smaller teeth. I don't know how they expected someone to use particularly just the saw blade with no actual attachment other than that arbor to fit in the chuck, but as a youngster, although I was doubtful, I did actually try to cut something with it - let's just say that I had a lucky escape and just ended up with the blade getting slightly bent!

The drill with its now virtually permanent saw attachment has had a lot of use cutting up 8 x 4 sheets of plywood, wallboard and chipboard, plus ripping through thick oak shelving for the radio room. I can tell you that the way to make a tool like this survive is to take it VERY slowly when using it and stop to let the motor speed up every so often. I also don't release the trigger straight away after finishing a long cut, I let it run for a minute off load to allow the cooling fan to do its job. It's the original saw blade, although it's gradually getting smaller and won't cut quite so deep due to me keep taking the triangular file to the blade teeth to keep it sharp. I used to be quite good with oiling the bearing etc. - probably another reason it's lasted so long after its initial early armature failure. A tool like this would be no good for a professional builder, as it would be too slow to use without burning it out, but with careful use it's a lot easier than sawing large sheets of wood by hand!

I've also shown the handy wooden box that I keep the drill bits and pieces in. I found it in a skip decades ago and it originally had a wind up gramophone motor fitted in it, although this may not have been its original use. The left hand side of the box hinges down and I have a vague recollection of something like this being described once before, but whether it was on this forum or somewhere else, I can't remember - perhaps a topic for another thread sometime.
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Old 13th Aug 2018, 11:57 pm   #37
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

Note the 'add-on' hammer attachment shown above - it's the round black thing with a chuck fitted. I bought this as an accessory decades ago and you grip the black casing of it with your hand while drilling to stop it turning and allowing the 'hammering' to take place. I've used it a lot, but I wonder what would happen if the innards suddenly failed and locked the thing up while you were holding it? I bet they wouldn't be allowed to sell a thing like that now, but I could be wrong - works well, though!
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Old 14th Aug 2018, 1:10 am   #38
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

I had that drill with all of those attachments with the exception of the hammer attachment until about 10 years ago.
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Old 14th Aug 2018, 8:52 am   #39
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Smile Re: Show us your drills!

Hi,
My uncle had a few attachments for his (I think B&D) drill, one of which was a rotary lawn mower, would you believe? I've never seen another one since, but I bet the drill would be red hot after doing the grass!
Cheers, Pete.
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Old 14th Aug 2018, 10:35 am   #40
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Default Re: Show us your drills!

I made a lawn mower with my D720 drill, some Dexion, Triang wheels and a blade made from inch by 1/8th steel strip sharpened - it worked O.K. but the blade kept coming loose and spinning off in random directions - Kids in those days eh?
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