UK Vintage Radio Repair and Restoration Powered By Google Custom Search Vintage Radio Service Data

Go Back   UK Vintage Radio Repair and Restoration Discussion Forum > Other Discussions > Member Introductions and News

Notices

Member Introductions and News A place where members can introduce themselves and post occasional news about themselves.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 4th Dec 2018, 11:23 am   #41
HamishBoxer
Dekatron
 
HamishBoxer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: W.Butterwick, near Doncaster UK.
Posts: 6,174
Default Re: Waiting for an epiphany..

All good stuff,remember no man is an island.
__________________
G8JET BVWS Member and V.M.A.R.S
HamishBoxer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th Dec 2018, 3:41 pm   #42
Bazz4CQJ
Nonode
 
Bazz4CQJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Oxfordshire, UK.
Posts: 2,094
Default Re: Waiting for an epiphany..

I've just been looking to see if there is a word which is the opposite of epiphany and there does not appear to be one. This leads me to take a term from Victor Meldrew, "I don't believe it ". There are times when "Don't believe it" events seem to come from every corner, sometimes even arriving in multiple packs. The worst ones often come from agents / agencies who you think are there provide help but are incompetent / negligent /apathetic. A friend went to an A&E department 3 weeks ago, was told to go home as there was nothing wrong with him, but he died a few hours later (aneurysm).

B
__________________
We know there are known unknowns. But there are unknown unknowns ones we don't know we don't know.
Bazz4CQJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th Dec 2018, 4:48 pm   #43
G4YVM David
Heptode
 
G4YVM David's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Salisbury, Wiltshire, UK.
Posts: 578
Default Re: Waiting for an epiphany..

I don't think there can be an antonym to epiphany. It might be "sudden realisation that one is WRONG" but that would be an epiphany too. A bit like devolution. It's daftness.

I think the Men in Black and their mind wiping torch would be antiepiphonic though

D
G4YVM David is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th Dec 2018, 6:58 pm   #44
Junk Box Nick
Heptode
 
Junk Box Nick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: West Midlands, UK.
Posts: 833
Default Re: Waiting for an epiphany..

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nymrod121 View Post
'If' (Rudyard Kipling): my Mum's handwritten copy;

"Desiderata" (Go placidly amidst the noise and haste; remember what peace there may be in silence ... avoid loud and aggressive people, they are vexations of the spirit ... etc.)
I have fading prints (they've been there so long) of these pinned on the wall of my work room. (I work a lot from home and have several elderly radios to keep me company.)

I have found the first two lines of If particularly apt in my line of work. This last summer I finally heeded the second piece of advice quoted above from Desiderata and sacked a particularly vexatious client. Not so good for the bank balance but far better for mental well-being!

I've always believed in hobbies and interests to provide a counterbalance to the madness of everyday life. I learned this at school which is a time I don't look back on with great fondness. Giving new life to old stuff is very theraputic - it also cocks a snook at the throwaway world. Growing older I've discovered that some of the simpler things in life are the most satisfying, like enjoying a good read or a walk in the country. If my head is clagged up with stuff the latter usually does the trick.
Junk Box Nick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th Dec 2018, 11:41 pm   #45
dave walsh
Dekatron
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Ramsbottom (Nr Bury) Lancs or Bexhill (Nr Hastings) Sussex.
Posts: 3,935
Default Re: Waiting for an epiphany..

If an epiphany is a moment of realisation or awareness then a state of obliviousness [not an exact opposite] at least represents something of the opposite condition-now fairly universal in my opinion] eg people who are surprised to find that they can't get immediate attention at A+E for something that barely qualifies as an accident and is definitely not an emergency or have no concerns or qualms about going there in the first place!

Dave W

Last edited by dave walsh; 6th Dec 2018 at 11:59 pm.
dave walsh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th Dec 2018, 12:25 am   #46
The Philpott
Octode
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Colchester, Essex, UK.
Posts: 1,330
Default Re: Waiting for an epiphany..

From when I used to listen to Radio 1 & 2 I remember sensing some smiles and air punching among the DJ's when Gary Jules' version of 'Mad World' got to No.1 in the charts at Christmas....it was never going to cheer people up, but did spread an all encompassing realisation that not everyone is having a good time just because it's xmas. It was a nice change from being Cliffed to death by Mistletoe and Wine. No offence to The Cliff, but all the stations were wearing the grooves off the records one year, and you can have too much of a good thing.

Dave
The Philpott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th Dec 2018, 7:27 am   #47
Radio Wrangler
Dekatron
 
Radio Wrangler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Fife, Scotland, UK.
Posts: 10,957
Default Re: Waiting for an epiphany..

Quote:
Originally Posted by Junk Box Nick View Post
I've always believed in hobbies and interests to provide a counterbalance to the madness of everyday life. I learned this at school which is a time I don't look back on with great fondness. Giving new life to old stuff is very theraputic - it also cocks a snook at the throwaway world. Growing older I've discovered that some of the simpler things in life are the most satisfying, like enjoying a good read or a walk in the country. If my head is clagged up with stuff the latter usually does the trick.
Indeed so.

I've been through a couple of nasty patches at work over the years. Sitting down to play with a radio at home reminded me that electronics was still fun. It was the horses who kept me sane (well, at a stable level of insanity - not intended as a pun). They offered friendship and support and had simple needs. Quite a relaxation from employment at a company which had started to promote loud and vexatious people because upper management mistook this for constructive activity. When the company fell apart, I wasn't terribly surprised. The vexatious people were fighting tooth and claw to hang onto jobs. It really got nasty. For me, going was a bit of a relief. I'd stuck around too long for my own good, but I realised that there was nothing left for me to want to stay for, so going was easy. The belief that loud people must be doing a lot continued, they dumped most of their quietly effective people and kept most of the loud ones. I watched from a safe distance the resulting acceleration of the decline. Then I got to see that although the effective people could find new jobs in smaller firms, the shouty ones were not in demand.

When you're brushing a horse, they will lean into you because it feels good. They will often hold one foot up at a time for you when they know you're about to pick out the impacted mud and any stones. You get pushed with their noses when they want your attention. You get frisked as a check to see where you might be hiding some mints. Life can be rather simple and very satisfying. Be sure to have a washing machine which will take your coat to get the slobber off

In the radio hobby world, I found I got treated as someone with some useful knowledge and skills. I could help people, and I could get help when I needed it. I felt valued. This does a lot to maintain self-respect and it was powerful enough to override the destructive influences at work.

I haven't had anything as abrupt as an epiphany, more a long smooth change that I didn't notice at the time. Only in retrospect did I see it.

I assume the shouty people are still clinging on, and the levels of vexation due to the concentration of their personality type must be really quite something. Something I'm happily clear of.

David
__________________
Can't afford the volcanic island yet, but the plans for my monorail and the goons' uniforms are done
Radio Wrangler is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 7th Dec 2018, 9:31 am   #48
electronicskip
Heptode
 
electronicskip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Gloucester, Glos. UK.
Posts: 776
Default Re: Waiting for an epiphany..

Quote:
Originally Posted by suebutcher View Post
Self-criticism is absolutely necessary when I'm working. I'm slow, but I want my work to be the best I can reasonably achieve, and not significantly worse than the last thing I got published. The problem is turning it off when I want to relax! So rather than risk a mood crash after a job, I busy myself with hobby projects. Which is why I'm here.
That's the way I tend to work too.
I'm a terrible critic of my own work and my own worse enemy when it comes to turning off at the end of the day.

So I also busy myself with multiple hobbies and pastimes , sometimes it does help but inevitably my mind wanders back.
electronicskip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th Dec 2018, 11:09 am   #49
Aerodyne
Octode
 
Aerodyne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Hampton Vale, Peterborough, UK.
Posts: 1,645
Default Re: Waiting for an epiphany..

Quote:
So I also busy myself with multiple hobbies and pastimes , sometimes it does help but inevitably my mind wanders back.
It is a continuing fight, one battle at a time, in a war that had beginnings lost in our early lifetime and with no apparent end. All we can do is enjoy and appreciate when things are good with us and learn to block, usually by directing our thoughts and efforts to our practical interests, the encroaching darkness.

I believe that everyone contributing to this thread will be sensitive to their own perceived weaknesses and 'terrible critics of their own work' and perhaps that is a measure of the people we are. Perhaps we should learn to go a little easier on ourselves... but that would be an impossibility, I fear.

If nothing else, this thread reassures each of us that we are far from alone.

Tony
Aerodyne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th Dec 2018, 11:27 am   #50
HamishBoxer
Dekatron
 
HamishBoxer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: W.Butterwick, near Doncaster UK.
Posts: 6,174
Default Re: Waiting for an epiphany..

All correct Tony.
__________________
G8JET BVWS Member and V.M.A.R.S
HamishBoxer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th Dec 2018, 6:27 pm   #51
astral highway
Nonode
 
astral highway's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: London, UK.
Posts: 2,754
Default Re: Waiting for an epiphany..

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazz4CQJ View Post
There was a report on the BBC News site a few days ago saying that there a number of hospitals are now treating patients with depression with ketamine. Officially, these are no more than further trials or studies.
I can see how this would help in an acute (emergency) psychiatric setting, as Ketamine is a dissociative in smaller doses (and an anaesthetic in higher ones.) But it wouldn't address the underlying causes. I've had surgical-grade ketamine as a dissociative during a painful process just before receiving a general anaesthetic, and it blasted me into oblivion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazz4CQJ View Post
I believe that it is the case that, faced with a lack of progress in understanding depression, all of the big pharmaceutical companies have abandoned work on new anti-depressants.
As someone who has faced life-threatening experiences and multiple unpleasant/intrusive in-patient interventions/ operations with complex recoveries over the last few years -- leaving me with PTSD on top of pre-existing experiences of mental health struggle and recovery -- I've recently finished reading 'Lost Connections', by Jonathan Hari. He cites well-validated research saying that curiously, anti-depressants which increase production of noriprenephrine OR dopamine OR serotonin are all effective in the short term. However, no anti-depressant on its own is ever or ever has been effective in permanently reversing severe anxiety or depression. (Also, pharma companies can introduce a drug that is successful in two trials, even if it has been unsuccessful in 998 trials!)

The typical pattern, he points out, is a short-term improvement, followed by an increased dose, followed by a further short-term improvement; rinse-repeat.

Unsurpisingly, adequate and frequent connection with others, meaningful employment or engagement aligned with deep values, 'sympathetic joy'(not being envious of others' success or achievements or material possessions) and security or freedom from anxiety about money, are cited as long-term determinants of psychological wellbeing. It doesn't mean we can magic these things up. It also doesn't mean that these things fix childhood or complex trauma. But the book is radical in proposing that anti-depressants don't and can't fix the deep things that we need.
__________________
Al

Last edited by astral highway; 7th Dec 2018 at 6:33 pm.
astral highway is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 2:18 am.


All information and advice on this forum is subject to the WARNING AND DISCLAIMER located at https://www.vintage-radio.net/rules.html.
Failure to heed this warning may result in death or serious injury to yourself and/or others.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2002 - 2018, Paul Stenning.