UK Vintage Radio Repair and Restoration Powered By Google Custom Search Vintage Radio Service Data

Go Back   UK Vintage Radio Repair and Restoration Discussion Forum > Specific Vintage Equipment > Vintage Audio (record players, hi-fi etc)

Notices

Vintage Audio (record players, hi-fi etc) Amplifiers, speakers, gramophones and other audio equipment.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 9th Jul 2019, 7:15 pm   #1
Christinemacca
Diode
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Glasgow, Scotland, UK.
Posts: 5
Default Auto return too soon on turntable?

Hi folks. Could some please help me??

I've a Sanyo g2711 model, and all seems fine apart from when I'm playing a record, it stops about 15-20 seconds before the song is finished. I'm kinda clueless about things like this. I adjusted the anti skate incase this was the problem, but it didn't help.

Does anyone has any suggestions how to fix things without opening anything up?
Many thanks
Christine
Christinemacca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th Jul 2019, 7:34 pm   #2
'LIVEWIRE?'
Dekatron
 
'LIVEWIRE?''s Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: N.W. Oxfordshire(Chipping Norton)
Posts: 6,747
Default Re: Auto return too soon on turntable?

At the very least the turntable will have to be removed. If, as many japanese decks, do, this has a Cam Gear and Trip Pawl, the likely cause will be dried grease.
'LIVEWIRE?' is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th Jul 2019, 7:55 pm   #3
Christinemacca
Diode
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Glasgow, Scotland, UK.
Posts: 5
Default Re: Auto return too soon on turntable?

Thanks so much for your quick reply. I can manage as much as taking the turntable off, as I changed the belt. Much more than that I'm rubbish at this kind of thing. I suppose I can live with this if it's a difficult job. Thanks again.
Christinemacca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th Jul 2019, 9:24 pm   #4
'LIVEWIRE?'
Dekatron
 
'LIVEWIRE?''s Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: N.W. Oxfordshire(Chipping Norton)
Posts: 6,747
Default Re: Auto return too soon on turntable?

It's not a difficult job. I'm not familiar with the Sanyo Turntable in particular, but the cam gear is usually clearly visible once the turntable is removed-it's usually a white plastic gear around 2" in diameter. The trip Pawl is two metal pieces which must be free to move. Maybe another member can explain in detail what is needed, but essentially the old grease should be cleaned off and new lubricant sparingly applied.
'LIVEWIRE?' is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th Jul 2019, 9:31 am   #5
Station X
Moderator
 
Station X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Ipswich, Suffolk, IP4, UK.
Posts: 14,763
Default Re: Auto return too soon on turntable?

This thread describes how the trip pawl works:-

https://www.vintage-radio.net/forum/...ead.php?t=8936
__________________
Graham. Forum Moderator

Keep the soldering iron hot.
Station X is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th Jul 2019, 12:57 pm   #6
Techman
Nonode
 
Techman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Lincolnshire, UK.
Posts: 2,333
Default Re: Auto return too soon on turntable?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Christinemacca View Post
I suppose I can live with this if it's a difficult job. Thanks again.
No, you can't just live with it.

When the chunk of metal on the platter spindle comes into hard contact with the trip as the stylus traverses the run out groove on the record, a considerable jolt is transferred to the stylus for a fraction of a second. This doesn't matter in the run out groove, but will matter if it keeps happening in the same place on the delicate playing grooves of an LP record. If you turn the volume right down and listen very carefully to the record deck, you'll probably be able to hear the clonk, clonk, clonk on every revolution of the record just before it auto-trips and lifts the arm off. If you look very closely, you may even be able to see the pickup head move or jump very slightly with each 'clonk'!

You risk spoiling your records (as well as spoiling your enjoyment of them), so it needs fixing. As said, it's an easy enough job.
Techman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th Jul 2019, 8:39 pm   #7
Christinemacca
Diode
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Glasgow, Scotland, UK.
Posts: 5
Default Re: Auto return too soon on turntable?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 'LIVEWIRE?' View Post
It's not a difficult job. I'm not familiar with the Sanyo Turntable in particular, but the cam gear is usually clearly visible once the turntable is removed-it's usually a white plastic gear around 2" in diameter. The trip Pawl is two metal pieces which must be free to move. Maybe another member can explain in detail what is needed, but essentially the old grease should be cleaned off and new lubricant sparingly applied.
Thanks very much

Quote:
Originally Posted by Station X View Post
This thread describes how the trip pawl works:-

https://www.vintage-radio.net/forum/...ead.php?t=8936
Thanks I appreciate this


Quote:
Originally Posted by Techman View Post
No, you can't just live with it.

When the chunk of metal on the platter spindle comes into hard contact with the trip as the stylus traverses the run out groove on the record, a considerable jolt is transferred to the stylus for a fraction of a second. This doesn't matter in the run out groove, but will matter if it keeps happening in the same place on the delicate playing grooves of an LP record. If you turn the volume right down and listen very carefully to the record deck, you'll probably be able to hear the clonk, clonk, clonk on every revolution of the record just before it auto-trips and lifts the arm off. If you look very closely, you may even be able to see the pickup head move or jump very slightly with each 'clonk'!

You risk spoiling your records (as well as spoiling your enjoyment of them), so it needs fixing. As said, it's an easy enough job.
Thank you. I appreciate your advice
Christinemacca is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 6:14 am.


All information and advice on this forum is subject to the WARNING AND DISCLAIMER located at https://www.vintage-radio.net/rules.html.
Failure to heed this warning may result in death or serious injury to yourself and/or others.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2002 - 2019, Paul Stenning.