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Old 23rd Aug 2019, 4:15 pm   #21
terrykc
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Default Re: Substance applied to Radio circuit board screws ?

What I recall was like cellulose paint on screws and, in particular, trimmers, to stop them moving with vibration. It was thin enough to allow movement if necessary, it just cracked.

My memory is of a green paint used by Grundig.

I've used nail varnish to do the same job after realignment - I also used it for creating the resist for one-off printed circuits.

As for the sticky stuff used for picking up small screws, etc. mentioned in post#8 - essential for retrieving dropped brass nuts and washer from awkward places - I used to use the sticky stuff that came with the sets - the wax in the end of waxed paper capacitors!

When plasticised caps put in an appearance I adopted the practice of throwing all the waxies I changed into a box that sat on the side of my desk.

When I changed my job and only saw 'modern' stuff (well it was in 1970!) I regretted not taking that box with me!
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Old 23rd Aug 2019, 10:13 pm   #22
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Default Re: Substance applied to Radio circuit board screws ?

A lot of older portable radio PCBs from the Far East had a layer of wax dripped over them to stop the components to stop them moving due to being loosely soldered.
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Old 23rd Aug 2019, 10:34 pm   #23
emeritus
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Default Re: Substance applied to Radio circuit board screws ?

Re # 8 and #21, the red wax from Babybell cheeses is excellent for retrieving small parts.
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Old 26th Aug 2019, 3:55 pm   #24
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Default Re: Substance applied to Radio circuit board screws ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard_FM View Post
A lot of older portable radio PCBs from the Far East had a layer of wax dripped over them to stop the components to stop them moving due to being loosely soldered.
That's not quite right.

I think you'll find that the wax was mainly used in FM radios with airspaced inductors. The alignment involved stretching and compressing the inductors as necessary and then applying the wax to stop them moving. It also stopped microphony which would be a bit of a problem if it affected the oscillator coil!

The wax may have covered other nearby components as well, as the wax puddle spread out before setting.
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Old 30th Aug 2019, 7:35 am   #25
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Default Re: Substance applied to Radio circuit board screws ?

I think the stuff referred to in post 1 was not intended to specifically cover screws but just landed there. I think it was intended to hold some components to the board.
similar to "evostick".
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