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Where To Get Sets and Parts For discussions about swapmeets, rallies, NVCF and BVWS, car boot sales, antique and charity shops, dealers, newspaper adverts, the local tip and just about any other source of equipment (other than eBay).

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Old 27th Feb 2019, 5:39 pm   #21
Sinewave
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Default Re: Drill bits

I always buy loads of small drills, they break, get lost. 4mm upwards I can sharpen on a bench grinder, so only buy more of those if I break one.
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Old 27th Feb 2019, 6:36 pm   #22
Bazz4CQJ
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Default Re: Drill bits

I always keep a good 3mm cobalt drill in a plastic box in my tool kit. If I can get a 3mm pilot hole, making larger holes is largely a question of mental attitude, even in adverse circumstances.

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Old 27th Feb 2019, 9:50 pm   #23
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Default Re: Drill bits

I bought some drills from Carrefour in France. I still can't believe how *good* they were :-(

First one went banana shaped when pressed to the work. Next one ended up with a glowing bulbous tip and the twist tightened. Unbelievable that anything so utterly useless could make it to market.
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Old 27th Feb 2019, 10:35 pm   #24
The Philpott
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Default Re: Drill bits

Youtuber 'Moonfleet41' has done a practical review of a budget drill bit sharpener available from more than one UK outlet. Lacking the will to dress my bench grinder wheels properly and learn how to regrind drill bits manually, i think i may get one. It looks a bit plasticky and if you constantly reground badly damaged 10mm bits with it the stone wouldn't last too long, but it does seem to take care of the correct angles, and gives an accurate centre to avoid drill wobble. It relies on a drill to power it (fair enough; why pay for an extra electric motor that you only use occasionally?)

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Old 28th Feb 2019, 7:34 pm   #25
Bazz4CQJ
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Default Re: Drill bits

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Youtuber 'Moonfleet41' has done a practical review of a budget drill bit sharpener available from more than one UK outlet.
Dave
That looks like a clone of the Martek which I've owned for many years. The Martek is 'OK', works best on drills from about 4mm upwards and drills that are not too bad before you try sharpen them. There's a learning curve to go up with it. Below 4mm the sloppy tolerances make it harder to get a good result and you can end up with deep groves in the stone. Generally does a fair job on a 6mm drill.

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Old 28th Feb 2019, 8:16 pm   #26
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Default Re: Drill bits

Isn't 'Titanium' just Aldi's name for the're better quality tools (usually red) as opposed to 'Workforce' for the're lower quality and cheaper tools (usually blue)?
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Old 28th Feb 2019, 9:08 pm   #27
Bazz4CQJ
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Default Re: Drill bits

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Isn't 'Titanium' just Aldi's name for the're better quality tools (usually red) as opposed to 'Workforce' for the're lower quality and cheaper tools (usually blue)?
Quite probably; it would explain the use of the capital letter (not used for chemical elements) and the fact that they are not made of titanium, though they could be coated with titanium nitride.

Just once, I had a drill some holes in a piece of titanium alloy and expected it would be hard work. It actually quite drilled easily with a cobalt drill.

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Old 2nd Mar 2019, 9:04 pm   #28
rontech
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Default Re: Drill bits

I try to avoid the use of a centre "pop" to locate a drilling position. I fit a small lathe type centre bit into a pillar drill. These bits have very short small point at the tip of a thick

( 1/4" or so ) shank and do not "wander"
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Old 2nd Mar 2019, 9:27 pm   #29
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Default Re: Drill bits

Centre punching is part of the marking out process so that the hole is drilled in the right place. It's difficult to feed a drill down to the precise interscection of two scribed lines, but very easy to centre punch the intersection and feed into that. Just rest the centre punch in one scribed line and slide it along until you feel it drop into the other one.

If you're not going to use a centre punch it's better if you use a proper spotting drill, which is what I use in my CNC milling machine.

Centre drills are intended for drilling centres in lathe work pieces intended to be mounted between centres. All to easy to break in my opinion unless your lathe has a lever feed tail stock. A screw fed tail stock is like using a screw type car jack and has no "feel".
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Old 2nd Mar 2019, 10:42 pm   #30
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Default Re: Drill bits

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Originally Posted by Station X View Post
Centre drills are intended for drilling centres in lathe work pieces intended to be mounted between centres. All to easy to break in my opinion unless your lathe has a lever feed tail stock. A screw fed tail stock is like using a screw type car jack and has no "feel".
Don`t really agree with this, my Myford ML7 has plenty of "feel" with the screw feed tailstock -I`m pretty used to it after 45 rears and have only broken a couple of (small) centre drills in all that time.

I sometimes use a small centre drill for starting 3.8 mm holes in front panels - gives more accurate results than going straight in with the finished size.
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Old 2nd Mar 2019, 11:12 pm   #31
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Default Re: Drill bits

We all have our own ways of doing things and so long as it works for us that's fine. This is a hobby and we're not aiming for max production rate.

My late father's Myford Super 7 had a lever feed tail stock for drilling and it was a joy to use when drilling small diameter holes. You could feel directly how the drill was cutting and pecking to clear chips was easy.

The worst thing about breaking a centre drill is that unless you have something like a spark eroder to get the tip out, you have to scrap the workpiece.
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Old 2nd Mar 2019, 11:31 pm   #32
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Talking Re: Drill bits

I always prefer to use micro radium tipped drills for non porous surfaces. Mind you I had to attend the special training seminar at Goon show HQ to qualify
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Old 3rd Mar 2019, 12:48 am   #33
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Default Re: Drill bits

One of the reasons I mentioned these was that there's a fw small size ( PCB EVEN) sized drills in th box. We all know just how tough PCB are on bits ( specially fibre boards), si I thought that Titqnium might last a bit longer. But for those that prfer HSS, Aldi also do a set of HSS bits, with each set containing a good few 1/2mm bits.
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