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Old 14th May 2024, 5:59 pm   #21
G6Tanuki
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

The new router should have a socket on it into which your legacy 'landline' phone should now be plugged.

The router then appears to the old phone to be like the old BT POTS exchange, generating dialtone, ring current and such.
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Old 14th May 2024, 7:08 pm   #22
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

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Originally Posted by G6Tanuki View Post

The router then appears to the old phone to be like the old BT POTS exchange, generating dialtone, ring current and such.
Well, it provides an A and a B line but you'll need either a microfilter with ringing capacitor or a traditionally-wired instrument with its own ringing capacitor to get the bell to work. I think the routers are designed for modern telephones like my Panasonic cordless where only two wires are necessary.

Mine generates a REN of 5 and will work several 'traditional' instruments satisfactorily.

Maybe some routers come with the third wire connected?
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Old 14th May 2024, 7:54 pm   #23
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

The ringing wire is part of the UK PO system and saw little use globally. Phones using a 2 wire standard had an internal ringing capacitor. It's hardly surprising that routers with VOIP designed in China, Taiwan or the US don't support this relatively obscure UK ringing system.

A microfilter contains a capacitor to regenerate the ringing signal.
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Old 14th May 2024, 8:21 pm   #24
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

The new router comes with a socket marked 'Broadband', and next to it, a socket marked 'Phone'.
Or rather, a hole for a sockert marked 'Phone', with a blanking plus marked 'Not For Use'.
Back to Square One.
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Old 14th May 2024, 10:09 pm   #25
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

Why did you have to have a new router? Has your broadband been converted from copper (ASDL or FTTC) to FTTP?

Which BT Router (commonly known as a hub) is it?
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Old 14th May 2024, 10:25 pm   #26
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

I was out of BT contract, and loads of telesales people claiming to be BT were bombarding me with misinformation. I decided to contact BT directly, and renew my contract.
The new router was supplied as part of that contract. I understand that the overhead line will eventually be replaced by an optical one.

Router is: GRV9517UAC34-A-5A
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Old 14th May 2024, 11:48 pm   #27
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

If you're still on copper that'll be ADSL or FTTC. Either way the phone will still plug into a master or slave jack.
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Old 15th May 2024, 12:09 am   #28
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brigham View Post
I was out of BT contract, and loads of telesales people claiming to be BT were bombarding me with misinformation. I decided to contact BT directly, and renew my contract.
The new router was supplied as part of that contract. I understand that the overhead line will eventually be replaced by an optical one.

Router is: GRV9517UAC34-A-5A
-A-SA actually
also known as a BT Smart Hub 2.
What I would do is rip off that "Not for use" label exposing the socket and see if you have a dialtone when a phone is connected.
If not, you may have accidentally signed yourself up for broadband sans phone line.
As the other Graham asked in post #19, what do callers hear when they dial your number?

I suggest you speak to BT support urgently if your phone number is important to you.
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Old 15th May 2024, 7:44 am   #29
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

It's obvious that something has been changed outside the OP's property, either at the cabinet or in the exchange. Were this not the case the phone would still work in the master socket. Perhaps the number has been converted to VOIP, or as the other Graham suggests, ceased altogether.

What is the name of the product the OP has signed up to?
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Old 15th May 2024, 9:26 am   #30
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

Someting HAS been changed outside of the property, because the existing phone in the existing socket continued to work for some hours afterwards, and then became dead.
The installing engineer said that this would happen 'at midnight'.
Incoming calls go to the 'handset' supplied with the new installation. Callers are unaware of the changes, and the existing number is retained.
(Keeping the number is the reason that I renewed with BT. The others couldn't guarantee it).
I have both broadband AND phone line, which is what I signed up for. All I need now is a means to connect the ex-GPO/BT instrument to it.
From BT:-
"You ordered Standard Fibre 76 Enhanced + Digital Line + Calls on 25-Apr-2024, and we've completed that order for you."
All suggestiongs gratefully received...
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Old 15th May 2024, 9:30 am   #31
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

I assume the handset is cordless?
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Old 15th May 2024, 11:19 am   #32
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

The 'handset' sits on a charger, but isn't wired to anything. There's something connected to the hub which looks like a transmitter, which the engineer said was 'your new phone'.
It all seems to work, in an unfamiliar fashion.
I'm going to investigate that 'not for use' label as soon as I get a minute spare.
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Old 15th May 2024, 11:43 am   #33
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

At last the problem has been clearly defined. It sounds like your phone number has been converted to VOIP. VOIP is not in my area of expertise, but I'm sure other forum members will be able to assist you.
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Old 15th May 2024, 11:55 am   #34
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

I just had to remove the 'not for use' sticker that proved to be covering a BT socket, and plug my phone into that when we went digital.
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Old 15th May 2024, 1:03 pm   #35
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

I've just done exactly that, and I've got nothing at all.
No dial tone, no ringer, not even the 'open line' sound.
I'm guessing that this socket is dead.
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Old 15th May 2024, 3:51 pm   #36
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

Quote:
Originally Posted by Station X View Post
'...but I'm sure other forum members will be able to assist you.'
I went from Plusnet FTTC (last-mile copper) to Fibrus FTTP. Fibrus installed an Optical Network Termination Unit, into which was plugged one of two Eero wireless routers. Into one of these routers was plugged a Grandstream VOIP interface box (which they nearly forgot about!) as I'd requested a landline contract, and the Grandstream VOIP box allowed me to use a conventional DTMF telephone. My existing landline number was ported over from Plusnet to Fibrus.

It sounds like you might need an additional unit to plug into your router to get VOIP access, and I'd be chasing it up.
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Old 16th May 2024, 12:12 am   #37
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brigham View Post
The 'handset' sits on a charger, but isn't wired to anything. There's something connected to the hub which looks like a transmitter, which the engineer said was 'your new phone'.
It all seems to work, in an unfamiliar fashion.
it seems they have provided you with a VOIP to DECT base station that plugs into a network port, plus handset, but with no means of connecting a wired phone.
It's a good solution and probably ticks all the boxes for many customers, but not if you want to plug a vintage phone into it.

One solution, and probably the one BT would endorse would be this adapter

https://www.businessdirect.bt.com/pr...0121-GN1T.html

But I wouldn't blame you for asking "Why should I".

I would speak to them and tell them you don't want their DECT solution, you anticipated that you could continue to use your existing phone albeit plugged in to their box.
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Old 16th May 2024, 11:24 am   #38
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

Thanks for the link, that looks handy - though note that they say you need one per phone.

Presumably, it plugs into any mains socket and the legacy phone plugs into it, with no use being made of existing phone cabling and connection being made by the DECT signal from the hub. Handy for a room with no wired phone currently, I suppose.

Would be nice to know more, i.e. whether it has the guts to ring a traditional "magneto" bell, whether it accepts LD as well as DTMF signalling, and if its REN is up to driving >1 ringer if you use a splitter. In the worst case scenario, the answer to all three could be "no"!
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Old 16th May 2024, 11:46 am   #39
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

I would have thought you could plug your existing wiring (suitably isollated from any other feed) into the adaptor - it would look like a single 'phone to the adaptor, though REN may be limited.
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Old 16th May 2024, 12:11 pm   #40
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Default Re: 1970s style telephones and operation on router

I currently have a wired extension upstairs which dates back to the days when you had to get BT to connect it directly to the master box and pay a rental for the extension, although you were allowed to use your own instrument.

Downstairs I also have several phones, all of which are tone dialling or have pulse to tone adapters fitted, plugged into the socket on the master box and fed through a REN booster. I hide the 150 phone and bellset if an engineer calls!

I assume that the old BT extension wiring will be disconnected when VoIP comes here and that I could simply connect the existing downstairs wiring into the socket on the back of the Plusnet hub and use a BT adapter for the upstairs phone(s). Am I being too simplistic or should this work?
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