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Vintage Radio (domestic) Domestic vintage radio (wireless) receivers only.

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Old 29th Jul 2004, 6:31 pm   #1
ChristianFletcher
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Default What is a good Earth for radios use.

I have a question about earthing my GEC BC5645, but I am sure this question is common to many other sets.

I had a problem with mains hum that could be heard on some very quiet sections of music when played at high volume. While trying to track down the hum I used my scope and found that earthing out the chassis with the probe return cured the problem. The radio's mains lead it only two core with no provision for an earth. However the chassis does have provision for an earth via a plug on the back. This earth is a solid connection not through a capacitors such as used on floating chassis.

Where is the correct source for earth on valve radio's , did the previous users in the past go and bang and copper stake into the garden and why did they not earth the chassis through the mains lead - perhaps to prevent earth loops ?

Regards Chris
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Old 29th Jul 2004, 6:37 pm   #2
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Default Re: What is a good Earth for radios use.

Hi Chris

I think the primary reason for not earthing via the mains was that the old round pin sockets very often had only two pins ie, no provision for earth.

Cheers.

Alan
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Old 29th Jul 2004, 7:01 pm   #3
Sam
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Default Re: What is a good Earth for radios use.

I agree. When the radios were mew there were not earth pins in sockets. Some people ran them from adaptors in light-fittings . I always replace the original 2-core leads with 3-core leads, if possible. You cannot earth AC/DC sets, or autotransformer ones. AC-only sets with 'proper' primary/secondary transformers can, and should, be earthed. As has been said before, safety comes before originality!

Sam
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Old 29th Jul 2004, 7:12 pm   #4
ChristianFletcher
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Default Re: What is a good Earth for radios use.

Thanks for that info.

I do earth this types of chassis as a matter of course. I have not come across any mains plugs without an earth - apart from those isolated shaving plugs. How many types of plugs were around in the past ?

I remember seeing those 5 amp plugs without fuses and those three pin plugs that have a round pin right in the middle.

Chris..
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Old 29th Jul 2004, 7:36 pm   #5
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Default Re: What is a good Earth for radios use.

In the early days most houses, if wired for mains at all, only had lighting circuits. This is why early radio books often show adaptors in light sockets. Even when power was introduced (5 & 15 amp unfused round pin sockets) there was often only one socket upstairs & one downstairs, often on the cooker box.
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