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Hints, Tips and Solutions (Do NOT post requests for help here) If you have any useful general hints and tips for vintage technology repair and restoration, please share them here. PLEASE DO NOT POST REQUESTS FOR HELP HERE!

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Old 21st Mar 2017, 2:26 pm   #21
merlinmaxwell
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Default Re: Light work bench.

Quote:
Which French king was that?
It wasn't:-
a) metrication in France (the one we are talking about) happened during the revolution, no monarchy left!
b) It was defined by the French at the time as a ten millionth of the distance twix the equator and north pole passing through Paris on a line of latitude.

To top it all the inch was defined as exactly 25.4mm in 1959, other common units have been referenced to the metric system to, so we all use metric, sometimes without knowing.

Back on topic, if using kitchen worktop support it quite well, an unsupported span of a metre (yard, couple of cubits) or so will sag after a while. Great for kitchens where cabinets sit under it.
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Old 21st Mar 2017, 3:02 pm   #22
ms660
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Default Re: Light work bench.

Kitchen (chipboard) worktops are usually either the thick type or the not so thick type, if using the thicker type for heavy work then I would recommend 600mm maximum unsupported span, another thing worth mentioning is if it's going in a damp building/shed or there's a chance of any moisture sloshing around then seal any exposed edges against moisture using an edging strip glued with impact adhesive.

As an alternative run a bead of clear silicone rubber along the exposed edge(s) and rub it in with a cloth, let it go off a bit then rub another layer in, that's the way I did all the edges of worktop cutouts and the back exposed edges of worktops when installing them and fitting drop in sinks etc.

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Old 21st Mar 2017, 6:45 pm   #23
G6Tanuki
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Default Re: Light work bench.

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Originally Posted by ms660 View Post
another thing worth mentioning is if it's going in a damp building/shed or there's a chance of any moisture sloshing around then seal any exposed edges against moisture using an edging strip glued with impact adhesive.
TBH if I was in an environment where damp-ingress to the ends of MDF shelves/worktops was likely to be a significant issue I'd be vastly more worried about the overall health of any electronic equipment stored there!
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Old 21st Mar 2017, 6:51 pm   #24
ms660
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Default Re: Light work bench.

Folks do.

Lawrence.
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