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Old 31st Dec 2018, 11:44 am   #1
Cathode Ray
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Default Atwater Kent 206 - delamination advice?

Folks,
Whats the best approach to deal with this case de-lamination?

The case seems to be made from plywood (made in 1934).
So not only is the outer laminated layer separating but some of the inner layers too.

Do I just try to get a much wood glue inside the layers as possible and clamp?
Or are there any clever ways ?

Thanks
Ray
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Old 31st Dec 2018, 3:53 pm   #2
cathoderay57
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Default Re: Atwater Kent 206 - delamination advice?

Hi Ray, I'm by no means an expert on this subject but here's my common sense solutions. If the existing veneer is still present then using a small blade or scraper slide PVA glue as far under as you can. Then clamp up inserting a piece of wood (spacer) between the clamp and the veneer to spread the clamp load and protect the veneer surface. It's a good idea first to cover the spacer in clingfilm to reduce the risk of its adherence to the veneer. If the clingfilm does stick to any PVA oozing out at the edges it is normally simple to remove it with a scraper or sharp knife after the glue has set. If the veneer is missing, then the problem is finding matching replacement. Remove the varnish or lacquer from an area of remaining veneer using a paint stripper and allow to dry. Sometimes re-wetting with white spirit gives a clearer view of what the veneer will look like when re-varnished. Then it's a case of looking online to find matching samples of replacement veneer. Craftshops are a good source for small quantities. I tend to avoid the pre-glued iron-on types of veneer because I have never been able to achieve a decent finish; it always seems to turn out lumpy. Then there's always the issue of getting glue residue stuck to the iron which doesn't go down well with SWMBO. If you cannot find a close match then go for something with similar-looking grain and match the colour when you get it with toner. Hope that helps. Practice does too! Cheers, Jerry
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Old 31st Dec 2018, 4:10 pm   #3
Boater Sam
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Default Re: Atwater Kent 206 - delamination advice?

The delamination is due to stress in the layers being unequal and failure of the glue with drying out. The ply started out flat and was steamed and soaked until it became pliable, bent around a former and left to dry.

Taking this as correct, if you get the plywood damp through the layers with dilute wood glue, pva, and maintain the correct shape whilst cramping the layers together, it will hold its shape once dried out again.

So I think you have to be brave. Cover the outside veneer with cling film that will not take pva and soak the whole thing right through with well diluted pva and deionized water.
Arrange as many clamps and formers as possible to hold the correct shape and leave it many days to dry.
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Old 31st Dec 2018, 4:46 pm   #4
Cathode Ray
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Default Re: Atwater Kent 206 - delamination advice?

Thanks chaps, it seems logical. Dilute PVA and let it soak for a while, then clamp it up good and tight under cling film.
The sound board and speaker can be removed to leave flat surfaces on both sides of the grill holes.
There is only one 3 " peice of veneer missing and i reckon I can source something in dark wood.

Cheers
and Happy New year to all.
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Old 4th Jan 2019, 9:07 am   #5
FrankB
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Default Re: Atwater Kent 206 - delamination advice?

That is a solvable problem, per one of my other antique restorer friends, who repairs many radio cases.
He coats each piece with Elmers brand white glue.
Then lets it dry.
He then says he takes and positions the piece in place then takes a hot iron- steal the XYL's if you need to- and heats the glue with it. The glue apparently becomes thermally activated and acts like contact cement, with the MAJOR exception: If you don't position the piece right, take the iron & re-heat it. The glue then becomes soft and you can move the piect to the correct position.
Yes, you will need to clamp it, and likely will need several go's to cure delamination in several layers.
I have several cabinets delaminating so will try this. I would practice on scrap first though.
HTH
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Old 9th Jan 2019, 7:47 pm   #6
Cathode Ray
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Default Re: Atwater Kent 206 - delamination advice?

Thanks Frank, that's a good technique. I will try it out.
Cheers!

Ray
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