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Other Vintage Household Electrical or Electromechanical Items For discussions about other vintage (over 25 years old) electrical and electromechanical household items. See the sticky thread for details.

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Old 10th Jan 2020, 11:34 pm   #21
Synchrodyne
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Default Re: Underwater scene?

I recall a notion from the 1960s or so that TV-top lamps (or behind-TV backlighting lamps) were preferably of the same colour temperature as peak white on the TV screen. That would have been 6500 K for CRT colour TV receivers I think, and something like 9300 K for typical CRT monochrome receivers. I am not sure that such lamps were readily available, though.

Cringeworthy back in the day I have seen lava lamps atop TV receivers.


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Old 11th Jan 2020, 2:01 am   #22
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Default Re: Underwater scene?

I can confirm lava lamps, I knew someone with one on top of their set. I suppose it gave you something moving to look at during technical faults. We had a model of a BEA Comet 4 on our set for a while, Dad would use the space to display his latest kits.
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Old 11th Jan 2020, 10:23 am   #23
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Originally Posted by Synchrodyne View Post
I recall a notion from the 1960s or so that TV-top lamps (or behind-TV backlighting lamps) were preferably of the same colour temperature as peak white on the TV screen. That would have been 6500 K for CRT colour TV receivers I think, and something like 9300 K for typical CRT monochrome receivers. I am not sure that such lamps were readily available, though.

Cringeworthy back in the day I have seen lava lamps atop TV receivers.


Cheers,
I heard a recommendation that lamps atop or near a TV set should be of a similar colour to the screen "to reduce eyestrain" The use of daylight incandescent bulbs was suggested, these being a closer approximation than ordinary bulbs.
In the USA, 3 way incandescent bulbs were popular, and the daylight version was suggested as being ideal for watching TV.
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Old 11th Jan 2020, 11:57 am   #24
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I've found that a little backlight can help with LCD screens that can't quite reach down to a proper black. Early LCD's were very poor in this respect, but our recent model Panasonic seems much better.
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Old 11th Jan 2020, 12:49 pm   #25
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In the USA, 3 way incandescent bulbs were popular, and the daylight version was suggested as being ideal for watching TV.
First time I saw those I was a bit perplexed, the rotary switch on the lamp holder selected one or two filaments lit. Presume they are still available, I saw them about 5 or 6 years ago.
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Old 11th Jan 2020, 1:50 pm   #26
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I don't know whether it counts as a TV-top ornament but when I was a boy "motion lamps" were all the rage. Here's one with an underwater scene:
Underwater motion lamp
I had one with a couple of cars on (a model T and a Bearcat). They seem to be very rare and expensive now.
Thanks for reminding me Stuart, my granny had a motion lamp with a waterfall on the shade, l thought it was magic!
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Old 11th Jan 2020, 3:00 pm   #27
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I heard a recommendation that lamps atop or near a TV set should be of a similar colour to the screen "to reduce eyestrain" The use of daylight incandescent bulbs was suggested, these being a closer approximation than ordinary bulbs.
In the USA, 3 way incandescent bulbs were popular, and the daylight version was suggested as being ideal for watching TV.
I've not come across the 3-way switched incandescent bulb, but in the 1950s Sylvania produced a series of "HaloLight" TVs whose translucent, illuminated tube-surround allegedly reduced eyestrain.

This century, Philips also had "Ambilight" - https://www.philips.co.uk/c-m-so/tv/p/ambilight

I think I prefer the illuminated sailing-ships toby-jugs staffordshire-dogs and blue glassblown fish.
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Old 11th Jan 2020, 5:33 pm   #28
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Our TV (one of the old CRT models) has one of those Japanese Money cats with a waving paw on it. When we get bored with the programme we can sit and wave back at it - oddly comforting somehow.

Years ago on the old Black and White set we had a lava lamp - again when the programme was not up to much we could turn it on and watch that instead.
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Old 11th Jan 2020, 5:54 pm   #29
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UK TV with Halo light.
https://www.radiomuseum.org/r/ferguson_246t246.html
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Old 11th Jan 2020, 6:20 pm   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by broadgage View Post
In the USA, 3 way incandescent bulbs were popular, and the daylight version was suggested as being ideal for watching TV.
First time I saw those I was a bit perplexed, the rotary switch on the lamp holder selected one or two filaments lit. Presume they are still available, I saw them about 5 or 6 years ago.
They are still available in the USA, popular wattages include 50/100/150 watt and 100/150/250 watt. Many others exist.
Used to be available in the UK, but are no longer manufactured AFAIK for 230/240 volts.

Usually controlled by a rotary switch built into the lamp holder, but wall mounted switches did exist.
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Old 11th Jan 2020, 8:54 pm   #31
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Default Re: Underwater scene?

Quote:
I heard a recommendation that lamps atop or near a TV set should be of a similar colour to the screen "to reduce eyestrain" The use of daylight incandescent bulbs was suggested, these being a closer approximation than ordinary bulbs.
In the USA, 3 way incandescent bulbs were popular, and the daylight version was suggested as being ideal for watching TV.
In my optometry student days (long ago) we were taught that light sources near the TV were a Bad Thing (glare source) and that the brightness of the area surrounding the screen should optimally be about one third of the screen's brightness. It still seems to be reasonable advice.
More recent guidelines around VDU screens in relation to general ambience and to their positioning relative to windows has evolved from that.

Last edited by GroovyG; 11th Jan 2020 at 9:00 pm.
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Old 11th Jan 2020, 9:41 pm   #32
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.... a model ship illuminated from within by a number of Christmas type lights. Often the lamps were fitted permanently and not user replaceable.....
I recall one of my friends parents having something like this, theirs was more like a Gondola and had permanently wired Lilliput bulbs fitted to it; I don't ever remember seeing it lit up.
I can also remember the "Ships wheel" style Television lamps I'm not sure where I have seen them though.

On the subject of television lighting I was advised many years ago by an optician that you should always watch television with plenty of light around it even if the rest of the room is dimly lit, I'm not sure if there is any evidence to suggest probelms with eye strain if this is not done however.

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Old 12th Jan 2020, 10:18 am   #33
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A much worse habit was putting houseplants on top of the TV, presumably the warmth of the set was good for the plant.
Many a TV was killed by the owner watering the plant and spilling water inside the set.....then switching the set on "to check its OK".

Peter
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Old 12th Jan 2020, 4:17 pm   #34
G6Tanuki
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Originally Posted by Electronpusher0 View Post
A much worse habit was putting houseplants on top of the TV, presumably the warmth of the set was good for the plant.
Many a TV was killed by the owner watering the plant and spilling water inside the set.....then switching the set on "to check its OK".

Peter
I recall being told about someone who had their budgie's cage hanging on a wall-hook above their TV.

The ventilation slots in the fibreboard rear-cover of the TV were large enough for spilled seed and other budgie-related products to pass through and gather on top of the chassis...
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Old 13th Jan 2020, 3:46 pm   #35
emeritus
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Bulgin used to do set-top lamps for listening to the radio in subdued light (as recommended by the BBC!). This is from their 1936-7 catalogue.
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Old 13th Jan 2020, 4:09 pm   #36
Electronpusher0
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Originally Posted by emeritus View Post
Bulgin used to do set-top lamps for listening to the radio in subdued light (as recommended by the BBC!). This is from their 1936-7 catalogue.
I want a "Miss Modern"!
Peter
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Old 13th Jan 2020, 5:32 pm   #37
Brigham
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Some of the more expensive TV sets had a 2-pin socket at the back for these lights.
My 21" MRG has one.
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