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Vintage Television and Video Vintage television and video equipment, programmes, VCRs etc.

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Old 27th Sep 2020, 8:56 pm   #41
Ewasterecycling
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Location: Halesworth, Suffolk, UK.
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Default Re: Cleaning video heads etc

Hope this helps on head cleaning too?...

I found yesterday that ebay had some stocks of Chemtronic cleaners, so if you don't have an Amazon account, these are also available:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Chemtroni...0/283597680940

Soak a pad certainly with IPA Isopropyl Alcohol (99.9%) and very gently press to the side of the entire head block azimuth unit. Hold it there, then gently turn the upper drum part to where the tiny head slot is located (usually 2, but some can have 4) so that then contacts with the wet pad and slowly turn the drum back and forth about 3 times.
Once done remove the pad and you should see a blackish line if any dirt was removed.
Never then reuse the pad, even if you can't see anything on it. Get a fresh one and repeat for the other head(s).

Retain the plastic sticks though as then you can reuse them again, with a new bit of Chamois strip cut from a large cloth that's widely available from most suppliers

It's true also (certainly for the VCR's I get in) many have dirty tape paths so it will be best to clean up everything before running a tape.

Most faults incidentally are just: worn pinch-roller, reel idler, broken and/or bad belts.
Being mechanical, it's a joy to work with as you'll be able to easily see which parts need replacing!

Getting the bits sadly is now the only real problem.

Also lastly, once/if you do get the machine to play, if the picture displayed is bad and looks like the heads could be worn out... just try a fastforward playback (if the machine has that function) as I've found in the past what looks like a sad tale of a dud head, actually it CAN be just a stubborn bit of gunk (possibly from a mouldy old tape!) that gentle cleaning didn't shift but a highspeed rip-through playback actually can clear!

This 'trick' also works well on Umatic machines too, as experience has shown their heads can clog-up badly certainly if bad tapes are used, and often machines are scrapped as it was assumed the heads were gone, but again it's just dirt.
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Old 11th Jan 2021, 8:20 pm   #42
toshiba tony
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Default Re: Cleaning video heads etc

I used to use my thumb nail, whilst attached of course, I never broke a head tip and thinking about it now it appears crazy. I managed to judge the pressure needed to achieve good results, you see people pussy footing around on successful methods but mine worked.
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Old 10th May 2021, 5:51 am   #43
Technomaniac
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Default Re: Cleaning video heads etc

Metho on a clean handkerchief, pulled tightly over the index finger. Pure Alcohol is better, with metho you must wait for it to evaporate or the drum can stick to the tape and make a terrible tangle. Same with pure alcohol, but it evaporates more quickly. Move the drum while holding the finger still, and turn it in the direction away from the finger. Then clean the lower drum trouble spots with the same covered finger, only, obviously this time you have to move the finger. The complete tape path must be cleaned, if it's a modern machine, you may find that the pinch roller is made from something other than rubber, which DISSOLVES in metho. You can clean it all day and still get a black finger. Also they go hard before they should. If you have an early roller that's OK, keep it in service. If the tape guides have nylon rollers, make sure they're free to turn. The audio/sync head is an important clean, the audio portion is at the top, I use a strip of kangaroo thonging, which is about 5mm wide, and work it like a shoeshine boy cleans a shoe with a rag, keeping it near the top of the head. The audio track is only something like 0.3mm wide so clean is essential. It doesn't need to be wet. If the machine is a 6-head type, because there are six heads on the spinning drum, the tape is slightly pushed away from the drum by each head that hits it, so the tape to head contact is never as good. This usually means that the performance drops off earlier with these machines. Clean the drive belts and the pulleys they run on. Re cleaning rollers, the foam rubber ones we used over here in recent times, were perished when we bought them into stock, so we had to stop using them and remove the cleaning assembly altogether. Creases in the tape is the main cause of dirty heads. Good tapes and you get a long time between problems.
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