UK Vintage Radio Repair and Restoration Powered By Google Custom Search Vintage Radio Service Data

Go Back   UK Vintage Radio Repair and Restoration Discussion Forum > General Vintage Technology > Cabinet and Chassis Restoration and Refinishing

Notices

Cabinet and Chassis Restoration and Refinishing For help with cabinet or chassis restoration (non-electrical), please leave a message here.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 16th Jul 2018, 12:16 pm   #1
PsychMan
Octode
 
PsychMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Fleet, Hampshire, UK
Posts: 1,094
Default Reviving a Finish

Ive never touched any cabinets before, but I'd like to have a go now. I have a Bush SRG86 with a rough cabinet, general lacklustre finish and some deeper scratches and gouges. I want to try and improve what is there and was thinking of using Rustins finish reviver, scratch remover, and possibly some wax pens for the deeper marks. Does anyone have experience of this Rustins product?

I see on here many mix white spirit and boiled linseed oil to achieve a similar effect? Any thoughts on if this is better and what ratios / wire wool gauge to use. I would imagine the original finish is cellulose lacquer as this is a late 50s gram.
PsychMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Jul 2018, 1:58 pm   #2
OldTechFan96
Pentode
 
OldTechFan96's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, UK.
Posts: 248
Default Re: Reviving a Finish

I've successfully used T-Cut to revive dull lacquered cabinets.

The cabinet went from dull and dirty looking to being nice and shiny. Then I finished it off with some wax polish from a tin.
OldTechFan96 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Jul 2018, 2:36 pm   #3
John10b
Hexode
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Aberaeron, Ceredigion, Wales, UK.
Posts: 425
Default Re: Reviving a Finish

Just thought I point you towards the sticky ďFrench Polishing for Beginners ď by Retired.
It contains very useful information which you might find interesting. I know you didnít ask about FP but it does make a fascinating read.
Cheers
John
John10b is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Jul 2018, 3:20 pm   #4
dseymo1
Nonode
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Shropshire, UK.
Posts: 2,947
Default Re: Reviving a Finish

Rustins Finish Reviver is similar in action to T-Cut, but perhaps rather less agressive, and does a great job without too much elbow grease required. Beware of letting it dry out on uneven surfaces though - the residue is very hard to remove from nooks and crannies.
dseymo1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Jul 2018, 4:14 pm   #5
Nickthedentist
Dekatron
 
Nickthedentist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Oxford, UK.
Posts: 13,789
Default Re: Reviving a Finish

A clean with aerosol foaming cleaner, touching-in deep scratches with brown felt pens or woodstain, finishing with Rustins Scratch Cover often works well.
Nickthedentist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Jul 2018, 5:41 pm   #6
ThePillenwerfer
Octode
 
ThePillenwerfer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK.
Posts: 1,106
Default Re: Reviving a Finish

It's surprising how effective beeswax rubbed on with 000 steel wool is.

Dirt can actually be your friend as if this gets redistributed it can effectively cover some blemishes.
__________________
"Experts are only good at one thing: explaining why something will not work!"
ThePillenwerfer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd Jul 2018, 12:25 am   #7
PsychMan
Octode
 
PsychMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Fleet, Hampshire, UK
Posts: 1,094
Default Re: Reviving a Finish

I went for this stuff in the end:

http://www.howardproducts.com/product/restor-a-finish/

Largely an American product, but found online quite easily.

Some of the pictures and videos found online show pretty good results when faced with rough looking finishes. I'll post some before and after pictures when I've given it a go
PsychMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th Jul 2018, 12:23 pm   #8
PsychMan
Octode
 
PsychMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Fleet, Hampshire, UK
Posts: 1,094
Default Re: Reviving a Finish

I tried it on the top first, as I'd originally planned to refinish it, it was so bad. Anyway here is a before and after. I used a bit of white spirit on cotton wool buds to remove the white paint specks first, and some wood soap to remove some of the tar like dirt on it. I then used fine wire wool to rub the restorer into the finish, let sit for 20 seconds and wiped dry. Pretty good results given such minimal effort and experience on my part. I will polish with beeswax polish at some point.

Thankfully the rest of the cabinet is in a lot better state to start with!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_5540.jpg
Views:	106
Size:	39.6 KB
ID:	166506   Click image for larger version

Name:	image1.jpg
Views:	108
Size:	32.4 KB
ID:	166507  
PsychMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th Jul 2018, 2:40 pm   #9
dave walsh
Dekatron
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Ramsbottom (Nr Bury) Lancs or Bexhill (Nr Hastings) Sussex.
Posts: 3,762
Default Re: Reviving a Finish

"Looks Good" [pun intended] Psychman. Will def get some!

Dave
dave walsh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th Jul 2018, 4:09 pm   #10
John10b
Hexode
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Aberaeron, Ceredigion, Wales, UK.
Posts: 425
Default Re: Reviving a Finish

It does look good, I used Danish Oil on my first attempt and was very pleased.
Iím just about to start on my second Radio Cabinet so I might just give this stuff a try.
Cheers
John
John10b is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th Aug 2018, 11:12 am   #11
The Philpott
Octode
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Colchester, Essex, UK.
Posts: 1,069
Default Re: Reviving a Finish

I'll put this query under 'reviving a finish'.....

Early avominor boxes- a wooden box with aesthetic 'doming' achieved on the top by shaped and bonded cardboard or wood fibres. My query is regarding the faux lizard/snake skin outer layer (black) which is very thin. Is there a product anyone has tried which spruces up a tired finish somewhat without over-tarting it up? I am thinking beeswax perhaps.

Dave
The Philpott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th Aug 2018, 2:28 pm   #12
peter_scott
Octode
 
peter_scott's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Edinburgh, UK.
Posts: 1,840
Default Re: Reviving a Finish

I find that linseed oil really enhances tired cabinets. It brings out the colour and hides small blemishes. There is no skill required in applying it. It does smell a bit and is initially oily but it does harden in a few days and loses its smell.

Peter
peter_scott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th Aug 2018, 3:41 pm   #13
peter_scott
Octode
 
peter_scott's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Edinburgh, UK.
Posts: 1,840
Default Re: Reviving a Finish

Example of before and after with linseed oil treatment. (After is on the right.)
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P1070426a (Small).jpg
Views:	83
Size:	62.8 KB
ID:	167020  

Last edited by peter_scott; 4th Aug 2018 at 3:56 pm.
peter_scott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4th Aug 2018, 3:48 pm   #14
stevehertz
Dekatron
 
stevehertz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Rugeley, Staffordshire, UK.
Posts: 3,317
Default Re: Reviving a Finish

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickthedentist View Post
A clean with aerosol foaming cleaner, touching-in deep scratches with brown felt pens or woodstain, finishing with Rustins Scratch Cover often works well.
I agree with that pretty much as a first port of call. If that doesn't work, or if it doesn't come up to the standard expected, then frankly a refinish is needed. Personally I'd apply the scratch cover polish first so as to ensure that it has maximum 'soak in' capability before you 'wet' it with other cleaners etc. Both the old cracked lacquer and any exposed wood will be like a sponge to the scratch cover polish if they're nice and dry. Old, cracked lacquer can look totally revived with scratch cover polish. For most people, this level of cosmetic restoration is all that is needed to obtain a nice, presentable, visually atractive version of the set in question.

BTW, Wilko sell scratch cover polish in three colours. I generally start with a colour that is lighter (ie 'light' or 'medium', rarely 'dark') than what I think is needed as it does have a tendency to darken the old finish. Best of luck.
__________________
A digital radio is the latest thing, but a vintage wireless is forever..
stevehertz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 9th Aug 2018, 7:09 pm   #15
The Philpott
Octode
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Colchester, Essex, UK.
Posts: 1,069
Default Re: Reviving a Finish

Further to post #11, i found that wax polish was no good, as a white residue was left in the low points after the solvent had departed. I went over the 'skin' sparingly with 3 in 1. Thus far this is satisfactory, leaves only a slight sheen and once it has soaked in there is no significant odour.
The Philpott is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 6:43 am.


All information and advice on this forum is subject to the WARNING AND DISCLAIMER located at https://www.vintage-radio.net/rules.html.
Failure to heed this warning may result in death or serious injury to yourself and/or others.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2002 - 2018, Paul Stenning.