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Vintage Amateur and Military Radio Amateur/military receivers and transmitters, morse, and any other related vintage comms equipment.

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Old 14th Jun 2017, 7:29 pm   #21
ms660
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Default Re: WW2 Amateur activity

http://www.americanradiohistory.com/...Page-0017.pdf#

And a little reminder by WW:

http://www.americanradiohistory.com/...Page-0035.pdf#

Lawrence.
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Old 14th Jun 2017, 9:05 pm   #22
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Default Re: WW2 Amateur activity

The October 1945 Wireless World has an article " Radar Production - Wartime Triumph of the Industry" that includes an illustration of a Magnetron, but gives no details of it in the text, or even mentions it by name.

The same issue has a notice saying that the Post Office is starting to accept applications for radiating licences from "... amateurs who held Artificial Aerial Licences at the outbreak of the war...", subject to certain conditions being met.

Scans of extracts attached.

I have a recollection of reading that Amateurs were allowed to keep their radio equipment, but had to surrender their transmitting valves for the duration.
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File Type: pdf Amateur TX licence.pdf (1.34 MB, 42 views)
File Type: pdf Magnetron.pdf (1.49 MB, 31 views)

Last edited by emeritus; 14th Jun 2017 at 9:17 pm. Reason: Replacement of incorrectly-posted file
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Old 15th Jun 2017, 9:59 am   #23
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Default Re: WW2 Amateur activity

Hi, A few page samples as requested.
Pete
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Old 15th Jun 2017, 12:12 pm   #24
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Default Re: WW2 Amateur activity

Thanks Pete.

Interesting to see the TX circuit has suppressor grid mod. I wonder what valve it uses.

I've kept a few big 4 volt valves in the hope of building an early style transmitter one of these days although perhaps not quite as early in style as that in the 'den' depicted in your pics.

Jim
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Old 15th Jun 2017, 1:11 pm   #25
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Default Re: WW2 Amateur activity

The Oct 1945 WW also has an article on the prospects for post-war Amateur Radio, which includes a photo of the impressive pre-war amateur transmitting station of the then-recently elected president of the RSGB, E. L. Gardiner.
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Old 15th Jun 2017, 5:51 pm   #26
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Default Re: WW2 Amateur activity

I have something called the Radio Amateur's Vade Mecum.
I am going on memory since away from home.

I seem to recall it was a stop-gap published because WW2 stopped update of RSGB handbook.

Date uncertain until I see it again.
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Old 15th Jun 2017, 8:03 pm   #27
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Default Re: WW2 Amateur activity

Amateur transmitters were completely banned in WW2 and, as has been mentioned, those licensees who were not called up (ie too young, medically unfit, or in reserved occupations) were recruited into the RSS.

Towards the end of the war there was a secret operation in which a selected few amateurs were issued with new callsigns, see here:
www.g0mwt.org.uk/newsletter/2006/2006-09-nl.pdf
This seems to have been set up to provide a communications channel for possible overtures from Germans seeking an end to the war, although no such contact was actually received.

A group of amateurs who worked at the Hanslope intercept station used to have mock CW QSO's by tuning into each other's HRO local oscillators and keying the aerial connections (the HRO is infamous for LO radiation) and a set of QSL cards for these games is around somewhere...
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Old 18th Jun 2017, 11:04 am   #28
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Default Re: WW2 Amateur activity

I've been following this thread with interest and would like to add a couple of comments.

In the US, all ham activity ceased upon the attack on Pearl Harbor. Prior to PH, there were restrictions on US amateur communications with certain countries, probably the belligerent nations would be at the top of the list.

Large numbers of US amateurs joined the Services and the ARRL talked the government into setting up the Wartime Emergency Radio System, WERS, operated by civilians. This was operational by 1942 and had duties similar to Civil Defence, I believe they used frequencies around their 220Mc band. There is still a modern interest in WERS history, there is a Yahoo group for the topic.
IIRC, there was another WERS-type service that operated by using the power lines as a medium for LF signalling.

I believe amateur radio in Germany persisted for the entire war but the stations were under direct control of the German authorities and may have had a propaganda role. Goering lamented that the Nazis had virtually destroyed the radio clubs in Germany and stifled the amateur spirit as we benefited from in GB and the Empire. Organisations like "The Early Birds" and The Civilian Wireless Reserve are cases in point where GB amateurs "rallied to the flag" at the outbreak of war.

The RSGB Bulletin, as mentioned, was published throughout WW2, although the Shortwave Magazine closed down in Sept 39 and the staff were called up. SWM restarted in 1946. The Bull ran a column called "Khaki & Blue" which kept enlisted amateurs in touch with each other and arranged hospitality and meetings for those far from home.

After WW2 there was a lot of discussion about the future role of amateur radio and the often illegal operations that took place on our bands by amateur still posted abroad with the military who had access to kit they could only have dreamed about in 1939!

I have a file from the National Archive that minutes a discussion by senior Royal Signals personnel of possible "improvements" to the amateur licence to encourage ex-military people to take part in the hobby. One section of the file compares the GB ham very poorly with his US counterpoint, citing the GPO as the main reason that GB hams didn't have much experience with traffic handling or emergency comms, etc. It also called the RSGB Manual "pathetic" C/W the ARRL Handbook!

Hope above adds a little to the discussion.

Roger/G3VKM
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Old 18th Jun 2017, 1:28 pm   #29
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Default Re: WW2 Amateur activity

When Britain declared war on Sept. 1, 1939, Canada was soon to follow. Even though the official declaration for Canada wasn't until Sept. 10th, the gov't moved quickly on amateur radio operators. The Minister responsible issued a letter to all hams on Sept. 5th ordering a cessation of all activities.

Shortly after they were getting invites like this. Notice that one is dated Sept. 7th, 3 days before declaration.
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Old 23rd Jun 2017, 11:04 pm   #30
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Default Re: WW2 Amateur activity

Here in the U.S. they did shut down all ham activity. I am not sure of the dates though. I can't access my old issues of QST to find it out.

Many ham transmitters, receivers, and parts were "donated" to the war effort. the government put out a call to the hams for equipment and parts., especially panel meters.
I remember reading about one U.S. ham who, in the service, was "reunited" with his own ham transmitter where he was stationed. He was overjoyed when he found his own call on it.

The hams were not totally out of business though. They started using "Carrier Current"- (That's sending messages through the power grid wiring). I am given to understand that was the "in" thing to keep your skills up.

Carrier Current is still used here by the power companies. Very similar to the railroads communicating through the rails. (That's why every section of rail here has a jumper bonded by welding or brazing from it to the next section).
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Old 24th Jun 2017, 10:36 am   #31
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Default Re: WW2 Amateur activity

Carrier Current, that is the system I was trying to think of in my earlier post. I have the QST back-numbers on CD for the whole of the WW2 period, a very useful archive.

73

Roger
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